Psychedelic Music @ Sunday Freak 25

Read the Interactive Version

Sunday Freak e-Magazine by Goa-Freaks.Com Special Psychedelic Music

 Read  our NEW Interactive Sunday Freak e-Magazine

    Open it full screen - Read it - Download it - Share it
   

 

 

Tuesday, 16 September 2014 07:37

The use of Ganja in India

The white man goes into his church and talks about Jesus; the Indian goes into his tepee and talks to Jesus
— Quanah Parker
 

There are three types of cannabis used in India. The first, Bhang, consists of the leaves and plant tops of the marijuana plant. It is usually consumed as an infusion in beverage form, and varies in strength according to how much Cannabis is used in the preparation. The second, Ganja, consisting of the leaves and the plant tops, is smoked. The third, called Charas, consists of the resinous buds and/or extracted resin from the leaves of the marijuana plant. Typically, Bhang is the most commonly used form of cannabis in religious festivals.

 
Cannabis or ganja is associated with worship of the Hindu deity Shiva, who is popularly believed to like the hemp plant. Bhang is offered to Shiva images, especially on Shivratri festival. This practice is particularly witnessed at temples of Benares, Baidynath and Tarakeswar. Bhang is not only offered to the deity, but also consumed by Shaivite (sect of Shiva) yogis. Charas is smoked by some Shaivite devotees and cannabis itself is seen as a gift (“prasad,” or offering) to Shiva to aid in sadhana. Some of the wandering ascetics in India known as sadhussmoke charas out of a clay chillum.
 
 
In Indian tradition marijuana is associated with immortality. The myth of the churning of “Amrita” by Hindu Gods is said to be the making of cosmic ‘Bhang’ (a marijuana drink) . This Amrita is known as the elixir of eternal life.  After churning the ocean, the demons attempted to gain control of the Amrita, but the gods were able to prevent this seizure, giving cannabis the name ‘Shudha Vijaya’ meaning ‘Pure Victory’. According to one description, when the elixir of life was produced from the churning of the ocean by the devas and the asuras, Shiva created cannabis from his own body to purify the elixir (whence, for cannabis, the epithet angaja or body-born). Another account suggests that the cannabis plant sprang when a drop of the elixir dropped on the ground. Thus, cannabis is used by sages due to association with elixir and Shiva. Wise drinking of bhang, according to religious rites, is believed to cleanse sins, unite one with Shiva and avoid the miseries of hell in the after-life. In contrast, foolish drinking of bhang without rites is considered a sin. Early Indian legends maintained that the angel of mankind lived in the leaves of the marijuana plant. It was so sacred that it was reputed to deter evil and cleanse its user of sin. In Hindu mythology hemp is a holy plant given to man for the “welfare of mankind” and is considered to be one of the divine nectars able to give man anything from good health, to long life, to visions of the gods. Nectar is defined as the fabled drink of the gods. Tradition also maintains that when the nectar or Amrita dropped from heaven, cannabis sprouted from it.
Shiva churning Bhang
According to legend, Lord Siva, the Supreme God of many Hindu sects, had some family squabble and went off to the fields. He sat under a hemp plant so as to be sheltered from the heat of the sun and happened to eat some of its leaves. He felt so refreshed from the hemp plant that it became his favorite food, and that is how he got his title, the Lord of Bhang. Cannabis is mentioned as a medicinal and magical plant as well as a “sacred grass” in the Atharva Veda (2000 B.C.) which releases us from anxiety and refers to hemp as a “source of happiness”, “joy-giver” and “liberator”.  It has been venerated and used as a sacrifice to the Gods. Indian Tradition, writing, and belief is that the “Siddhartha” (the Buddha), used and ate nothing but hemp and its seeds for six years prior to announcing (discovering) his truths and becoming the Buddha.
 
BUDDHA
Fifteenth-century documents refers to cannabis as endowing light-heartedness, joy and rejoice, and claimed that among its virtues are “astringency”, “heat”, “speech-giving”, “inspiration of mental powers”, “excitability” and the capacity to “remove wind and phlegm”.
Among fakirs (Hindu and Muslim Ascetics) bhang is viewed as the giver of long life and a means of communion with the divine spirit. Like his Hindu brother, the Muslim fakir reveres bhang as the lengthener of life and the freer from the bonds of self. Shirdi Sai Baba, a well renowned Saint used to smoke hemp in a chillum (pipe); this chillum is believed to have magical and spiritual attributes.
According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, the section on “mysticism”:
 
"The Vedas (Hindu sacred writings) are hymns to the mystic fire and the inner sense of sacrifice, burning forever on the ‘altar Mind’. Hence the abundance of solar and fire images: birds of fire, the fire of the sun, and the isles of fire. The symbol system of the world’s religions and mysticisms are profound illuminations of the human-divine mystery. Be it the cave of the heart or the lotus of the heart, ‘the dwelling place of that which is the Essence of the Universe, "the third eye", or the eye of wisdom’ - the symbols all refer back to wisdom entering the aspiring soul on its way to progressive self-understanding. ‘I saw the Lord with the Eye of the Heart. I said, "Who art thou?" and he answered, "Thou"’."
 
The ancient Indian mystics said, “…that in the ecstasy of bhang (marijuana) the spark of the Eternal in man turns into light the murkiness of matter or illusion and the self is lost in the central soul fire. Raising man out of himself and above mean individual worries, bhang makes him one with the divine force of nature and the mystery ‘I am he’ grew plain. (Taken from the Indian Hemp Drugs Commission Report which was written at the turn of the twentieth century.)
 
In the early 20th Century AD,  the Indian Hemp Drugs Commission set up to study the use of hemp in India contains the following observations :
"…Bhang is the Joy-giver, the Sky-filler, the Heavenly- Guide, the Poor Man’s Heaven, the Soother of Grief…No god or man is as good as the religious drinker of bhang…The supporting power of bhang has brought many a Hindu family safe through the miseries of famine. To forbid or even seriously restrict the use of so gracious an herb as the hemp would cause widespread suffering and annoyance and to large bands of worshipped ascetics, deep-seated anger. It would rob the people of a solace on discomfort, of a cure in sickness, of a guardian whose gracious protection saves them from the attacks of evil influences…” . I find it so ironic that the British Raj didn’t attempt any prohibition on the plant so as not to hurt the sentiments of the Indian people; The plant was later prohibited much later, by our own Indian Government, post Indian Independence! L
 
According to Earnest Abel in “Marijuana - The First Twelve Thousand Years - 6” , the Sikh community in India used hemp as Sukhnidhan, sometimes referred to as Bhang, is a war beverage, first created and prepared by Guru Gobind Singh, consisting of a mixture of water, almond nuts, milk and cannabis. Narrated by many Sikh, Muslim, Hindu and Persian native accounts, the Singhs used Sukhnidhan and consumed Sukhnidhan daily. The Indian Hemp Drugs Commission Report describes the traditional use of cannabis in the Sikh religion.
 
“Among the Sikhs the use of bhang as a beverage appears to be common, and to be associated with their religious practices. The witnesses who refer to this use by the Sikhs appear to regard it as an essential part of their religious rites having the authority of the Granth or Sikh scripture. Witness Sodhi Iswar Singh, Extra Assistant Commissioner, says :”As far as I know, bhang is pounded by the Sikhs on the Dasehra day, and it is ordinarily binding upon every Sikh to drink it as a sacred draught by mixing water with it. Legend—Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth guru, the founder of the Sikh religion, was on the gaddi of Baba Nanak in the time of Emperor Aurangzeb. When the guru was at Anandpur, tahsil Una, Hoshiarpur district, engaged in battle with the Hill Rajas of the Simla, Kangra, and the Hoshiarpur districts, the Rains sent an elephant, who was trained in attacking and slaying the forces of the enemy with a sword in his trunk and in breaking open the gates of forts, to attack and capture the Lohgarh fort near Anandpur. The guru gave one of his followers, Bachittar Singh, some bhang and a little of opium to eat, and directed him to face the said elephant. This brave man obeyed the word of command of his leader and set out on horse back with his shield and spear to attacked the elephant, who was intoxicated and had achieved victories in several battles before, with the result that the animal was overpowered and the Hill Rajas defeated. The use of bhang, therefore, on the Dasehra day is necessary as a sacred draught. It is customary among the Sikhs generally to drink bhang, so that Guru Gobind Singh has himself is said to have said the following poems in praise of bhang: “Give me, O Saki (butler), a cup of green colour (bhang), as it is required by me at the time of battle. “Bhang is also used on the Chandas day, which is a festival of the god Sheoji Mahadeva. The Sikhs consider it binding to use it on the Dasehra day-The quantity then taken is too small to prove injurious.” As Sikhs are absolutely prohibited by their religion from smoking, the use of ganja and charas in this form is not practised by them. of old Sikh times, is annually permitted to collect without interference a boat load of bhang, which is afterwards. distributed throughout the year to the sadhus and beggars who are supported by the dharamsala. Sukhnidhan is offered as a holy drink or Kara Parshad to all visitors in a Gurdwara. This is regarded as food blessed by the Guru and should not be refused.”
 
By the sixteenth century A.D., it found its way into India’s popular literature. The Dhurtasamagama, or “Rogue’s Congress”, a light farce written to amuse audiences, has two beggars come before an unscrupulous judge asking for a decision on a quarrel concerning a maiden at the bazaar. Before he will render his decision, however, the judge demands payment for his arbitration, In response to this demand, one of the beggars offers some bhang. The judge readily accepts and, tasting it, declares that “it produces a healthy appetite, sharpens the wits, and acts as an aphrodisiac”.
 
In the Rajvallabha, a seventeenth-century text dealing with drugs used in India, bhang is described as follows:
“India’s food is acid, produces infatuation, and destroys leprosy. It creates vital energy, increases mental powers and internal heat, corrects irregularities of the phlegmatic humor, and is an elixir vitae. It was originally produced like nectar from the ocean by churning it with Mount Mandara. Inasmuch as it is believed to give victory in the three worlds and to bring delight to the king of the gods (Siva), it was called vijaya (victorious). This desire-filling drug was believed to have been obtained by men on earth for the welfare of all people. To those who use it regularly, it begets joy and diminishes anxiety.”
 
 
Cannabis was also an important part of the Tantric religious yoga sex acts consecrated to the goddess Kali. During the ritual, about an hour and a half prior to intercourse the devotee placed a bowl of bhang before him and uttered the mantra: "Om hrim, O ambrosia-formed goddess [Kali] who has arisen from ambrosia, who showers ambrosia, bring me ambrosia again and again, bestow occult power [siddhi] and bring my chosen deity to my power."  Then, after uttering several other mantras, he drank the potion. The delay between drinking the bhang and the sex act was to allow the drug time to act so that it would heighten the senses and thereby increase the feeling of oneness with the goddess.
Published in NEWS Archives
Tuesday, 16 September 2014 06:41

The story of Malana

A remote primitive little village in the Himalayas, Malana was isolated from the outside civilization for thousands of years. Was never invaded or ruled by an external administration. The people there had been living in harmony with nature, an innocent pure existence with their own language, their own world, their own democracy. Their people’s republic has been governed by a village council with an upper house and a lower house like the bicameral assemblies of our parliament. The council members are chosen by the village folk through a process of unanimous selection - not an election! Their court has been resolving all their internal disputes. No manipulation, no favoritism, they have their God in front. All decisions have been unanimous; every individual’s opinion is considered – unlike the present form of democracy that leads to dictatorship of the majority. And the secret of their civilization has been trust. the democracy of trust. Since a given word is taken as absolute, they have never felt the need for formal education.
 
In popular belief they are supposed to be the descendants of some deported Greek soldiers of Alexander, yet some traces their existence rooted deep in Hindu mythology. Their ancestral roots may be debatable but their democratic setup with participatory court procedure has similarity to that of ancient Greece.
 
And they have been producing some very good quality hashish. Blessed by Lord Shiva good quality cannabis plant grows in abundance there. For ages the use of cannabis has been an integral part of their lives, from medicine to footwear. But in the past they had never traded it; neither did they know the value of it. Their only trade with the outside world had been sheep wool.
In the seventies came some white men. They taught the villagers how to rub the cream – the cleaner and more potent hashish suitable for an international market. Those foreigners drew them into business. Malana cream became an international brand. Hashish production grew like a home industry for each household. The poor villagers started earning money and they didn’t know the value of money either.
The Indian government took notice of a hidden backward tribe who as par laws of the state were into criminal activity. The outlaws were to be brought under the rule of our mainstream democracy. Malana became a part of our national electorate, a part of our mainstream administration.
 
And the invasion begins… To give them the light of our civilization government starts building a series of dams, tunnels through the mountain to generate hydel-power. Malana gets electricity, Television, satellite dishes, mobile phones, a vehicular road. With them comes all the vices of a modern world, comes money, comes greed. The incursion of political parties also means creation of political polarity among the beautiful people of a peaceful hamlet. With no knowledge or perspective of the outer world innocent illiterate villagers take sides of political parties and create a divide within.
 
And the fire strikes… In January 2008, in a devastating fire, caused by an electrical short circuit, half the village including four ancient temples gets completely destroyed. The villagers comprehend that the political divide has disturbed their unity so the God is angry. The people who haven’t lost their houses accommodate those who have lost theirs. But the fire annihilates; the curse of the modern world has hit hard upon the hidden treasure of this ancient civilization - their trust.
The rebuilding of Malana witnesses transition of an ancient civilization. Rules of the modern world, which promote homogenization and convenience, force replacement of traditional methods and practices. In our democracy it’s illegal to cut trees, so the villagers are forced to build concrete houses instead of their traditional stone and wood ones. Poor villagers cannot understand how come the government can destroy their jungle to built the dam or the road and they themselves are prohibited to cut a few trees to rebuild their homes! Concrete house means outside knowledge, outside people, more money; so comes outside aids with their political interests! An age-old traditional society crumbles; the influential individuals turn corrupt, families break apart, brothers fight.
 
For the poor villagers hashish still remains their only means to earn some money, and it’s a very little money, not even enough to make their living forget about rebuilding their homes. Their production is very restricted now because of police watch. They don’t understand why they have to give away something, which has been so special to them for thousands of years! For them governance is for the people, so why can’t the government make special sanctions for these poor people in crisis! They don’t realize why they have to become a part of India and loose their sovereignty!
 
We can see the end is very near. In the name of progress of human civilization, like thousands others, another ancient civilization is getting engulfed by a modern one, loosing its unique identity to homogenization. When the whole world is looking for an answer to the shortcomings of the present form of democracy, we witness a beautiful model of self-governance, one of the world’s oldest forms of democracy for the people being obliterated by the rule of the majority.
 
I feel destined to record such a reality… some moments of truth, some disappearing myths, some wisdom of trust… a dying account of an obscured victim of human progress!
 
Fear and Loathing in the Magic Valley of Malana, India’s Cannabis Country
By Shweta Desai, 10th January 2014 (Republished with permission) 
 
Deep in India’s Himalayas, in the remote and isolated Kullu Valley of Himachal Pradesh, is the quiet village of Malana. When autumn arrives each year, Malana is enveloped in what was once a hopeful air brought on by the new harvest, as lanky cannabis trees bloom wild in panoramic fields and against scattered houses. Farmers and villagers begin cultivating in late September, rubbing the buds of fully bloomed plants between their palms to extract the brown hashish resin known mystically as Malana’s crème. Today this time of year carries with it the dark pall of police interference.
 
Cannabis/Marijuana in Malana, India
 
Malana’s crème has a notorious legacy in international stoner culture. It has won the Best Hashish title twice, in 1994 and 1996, at High Times magazine’s Cannabis Cup. Marijuanaphiles the world over have since made this region a popular weed-tourist destination, branded in travel and ganja-hunting literature as the exotic and alluring “Malana and the Magic Valley.” It was inevitable that the farmers would start to realize the global potential of their plants—and that the cops would take any and all measures to prevent these rural agriculturalists from increasing production. The most effective tool in authorities’ arsenal is satellite technology, but the farmers have found a workaround.
Malana is perched on a treacherous cliff, and until recently the only way to reach it was by foot. This helped marijuana farmers avoid the close monitoring of local and national police. But new roads connecting the village with surrounding towns and cities have resulted in a harsh reality for farmer-businessmen ambitious with their valuable crop. Because of these recently paved roads, cops are now able to respond quickly to intel provided by satellite Global Positioning Systems (GPS). They have destroyed Malana’s visible, free-range hemp crops three times in each of the last three years, prosecuting villagers—this year there have been 42 cases—who were growing crops on their private land. Repeated offenses can lead to cancellation of land ownership. This approach by the authorities has prompted citizens to cultivate cannabis in large tracts of government forest, making it difficult to prove ownership.
“The plant was here long before the police came—or the foreigners, the road, the electricity,” says 22-year-old Shanta, a grower. “Even before this bhang [cannabis] became the famous Malana crème. Why are we being made criminals?”
Perhaps the most interesting question is not why, but how.
“With the GPS system we can spot the exact locations of the crops,” says Vinod Dhawan, superintendent of police in the Kullu District. “These places are videographed and marked once the crop is destructed to ensure the villagers don’t come back for cultivation.” With Western customers, comes Western-like authoritarian overreach.
 
Marijuana/Cannabis in Malana, India
 
Satellite images procured by the Narcotics Control Bureau—the country’s main drug enforcing agency—have identified 52 independent regions in the districts of Kullu, Mandi, Chamba, Kangra, Sirmour and Shimla, including an estimated 2,500 villages, where cannabis cultivation is a major source of livelihood. The police can act only when they have some information, of course, but the percentage of crop destruction stands at around 40 percent of Malana’s annual take. It’s not a tenable business model for farmers with no other income, so they’ve taken their farms elsewhere.
“We go deep in the forests, where the police cannot see the farms,” says Shanta, who treks five hours each day from Malana into the forests to reach his cannabis farms.
“It takes an expertise of a mountain climber and at least eight hours for the police to climb the high peaks where these farms are,” says superintendent Dhawan. “With the production of cannabis in the valley taking place between September and November, it is practically impossible for us to eradicate cannabis 100 percent in two months time.’’ With little incentive and a tiny budget, the police are fighting an uphill battle.
High yield coupled with cheap labor makes India’s retail prices among the lowest in the world based on quality. The popularity of Malana’s hashish is now intrinsically attached to the livelihood of the villagers, with the majority of the 2,000 or so inhabitants involved in cannabis farming in one way or another. But the production and cultivation of cannabis in India was not always prohibited. Its consumption even today is widely accepted in both religious and social settings. In fact, the government used to set up weed retail shops during holidays like Holi, a festival celebrating the triumph of good over evil.
But growing international pressure in the 1960s, largely led by the United States of America’s war on drugs, led India to codify recreational drugs like weed with harder ones like cocaine and heroine under the Indian Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Act of 1985. Conviction under the law for cultivation or sale of any of these carries a prison term of no fewer than 10 years.
For local farmers in Malana, not cultivating marijuana is like living on an island and not fishing.
Historically, Malana’s villagers used the indigenous plant’s strong fibers to make shoes and its seeds to brew hash oil for cooking. It remains integral as a religious offering to the presiding local deity, Jamlu Devta. It is only recently that the locals have started to truly understand the financial value of their treasure. The cultivation of the crème is a full-fledged trade industry—one unlike any other the people have.
“The police say it’s a drug,” Shanta says. “That it is dangerous. But this is just a plant—a naturally grown one. We don’t know why this is dangerous.”
According to the “World Drug Report 2012″ from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, India has over the course of the last decade become one of the major global sources of hash, along with Morocco, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Lebanon. The reported cannabis cultivation in India stands at 10,539 acres, which is low in comparison with Afghanistan (59,305 acres), Mexico (40,772 acres) and Morocco (23,227 acres).
Villagers say of the 1 million pounds of cannabis and 500,000 pounds of hashish produced in India, a meager 330 pounds comes from the Malana village. The rest, they claim, is from surrounding villages, and even Nepal. Though tasked with cracking down on cannabis production and preventing its circulation in the cities, the police are aware of the sociological difficulties of playing by the book.
 
 
“Cannabis is a social and cultural issue,” says Dhawan. “We take all the possible action, but we cannot fight this menace by registering offenses against the local villagers and putting them behind bars all the time. We cannot make these people from Malana orphans.”
Filmmaker Amlan Dutta, a vocal supporter of legalization of cannabis in India, agrees with Dhavan.
“The harsh reality is that hashish has become a means of livelihood,” says Dutta. “However, cannabis farming for social and cultural reasons should not be criminalized.”
 
In his award-winning documentary BOM: One Day Ahead of Democracy, Dutta highlights the transition in Malana due to development and the struggle for sustenance under the growing police intimidation. Decriminalization of cannabis, he says, would relieve the drug enforcing agencies from the added burden of destroying cannabis plantation and registering criminal offenses against the villagers. It would also allow people from Malana to grow cannabis legally as in Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh, where the Indian government provides production licenses for medicinal and research purposes.
 
Filmmaker Amlan Dutta smoking...something.
 
In the last few years, Dutta initiated the BOM BOM trust with like-minded supporters to retain Malana’s self-sufficient, weed-heavy economy. The trust offers vocational training in sheep rearing, wool production, jam making, honey collection and the creation of alternate products from cannabis like hemp oil and hemp paper. It also sponsors students from Malana for higher education in Kullu valley.
“The villagers know that their sustenance is on something which is illegal,” Dutta says. “So it has become a criminal community. If we can reduce their dependency on hashish production in any way and legalize the cannabis cultivation, we still can save Malana.”
 
 
Published in NEWS Archives
Tuesday, 16 September 2014 06:05

The Story of Charas, Malana & Parvati Valley !

In India, there has been a long recorded history of the sacramental use of the Cannabis plant popularly known as "Ganja" in India. Even today there are many religious / spiritual sects in India who use Ganja to attain altered states of consciousness which bring them closer to their inner divinity, allowing wisdom and intuition to rise within their consciousness. A million and more Naga Babas, the Nihangs of Punjab, the Pandas of Orissa all use Cannabis in one form or another and have been doing so for many many years. So how did this amazing plant get to be ostracized by modern society ? Someone obviously doesn't want us all to wake up from the slave driven reality we help co-create.


The illegality of Cannabis in India doesn't stop millions of people living here, who choose to use the herb on a regular basis regardless of the so called law. How is it that we still accept a law which makes a plant illegal ? Doesn't matter which part of the world you live in, there has got to be some sense and coherence in the way we choose to live our lives, freely, without having to accept inane laws that are made to diminish our frequency and keep us enslaved in our self created prisons. The fact is that most people who use Cannabis regularly know the true worth of the sacred herb. The history of the plant and its long recorded use by sages and ascetics is evidence of the magical potential it holds as a plant teacher, a friend.

While most people in the world use Cannabis, the flowering tops (buds) of the female plant, there are some who make use of the resin collected from the buds of a mature plant. Charas, the holy resin from the Cannabis plant is considered a gift from Shiva and is said to aid all Shaivites (People who follow Shiva) in their Sadhana. In the Hindu Kush mountain ranges of India, its Cannabis Indica which thrives and is known to be quite different from Cannabis Sativa strain in its effects.

Cannabis Sativa has a higher level of THC compared to CBD, while Cannabis Indica has a higher level of CBD compared to THC. Cannabis strains with relatively high CBD:THC ratios are less likely to induce anxiety. This may be due to CBD's antagonistic effects at the cannabinoid receptors, compared to THC's partial agonist effect.

 

CBD is also a 5-HT1A receptor (serotonin) agonist, which may also contribute to an anxiolytic-content effect. This means that the high concentrations of CBD found in Cannabis indica mitigate the anxiogenic effect of THC significantly. The effects of sativa are well known for its cerebral high, while indica is well known for its sedative effects which some prefer for night time use.

Both types are used as medical cannabis. Indica plants are normally shorter and stockier than sativas. They have wide, deeply serrated leaves and a compact and dense flower cluster. The effects of indicas are predominantly physical and sedative.
 

An interesting documentary called Goonj, about the scene in Himachal, particularly around the Malana village where most villagers have been growing Cannabis as their main cash crop. The documentary features one of India's well known film actors, Naseeruddin Shah who has always been pro cannabis and doesn't shy away from accepting the fact that he loves the herb too and sees the illegality of the plant absolutely illogical.

Charas from the Himalayas goes all around the world and due to its high quality and popular demand it's value also increases manifold as it crosses borders and makes its way into Europe. In Amsterdam for instance, the coffee shops sell different varieties of Cannabis, Charas and Hashish openly to their customers. Good Charas from India could be anywhere between €10 and €20, maybe more if its really top notch quality !

In India, because of its huge supply and demand, the prices have been sky rocketing. As the Charas leaves the villages of Himachal and makes its way to other Indian cities, the price for a tola (10 gms) could range anywhere between 1k - 3k. The purity of the stash can be questionable though, with all kinds of other stuff added to it as it exchanges hands. Parvati Cream from Himachal is considered the best variety of Charas one can smoke while in India. Its also sometimes referred to as "Junglee Maal" and is really really potent stuff !

The Smoking Babas : Holy Men of India

Although most people prefer rolling a joint which has a mixture of tobacco and charas, in larger groups of regular smokers Chillums are passed around more often with an opening salutation to Shiva ...
 
... Bom Bholenath ...
Published in NEWS Archives
Friday, 13 June 2014 05:07

Psychedelic Electronic Dub

When we were preparing this edition, we consulted with few respected and aged Psychedelic Gentlemen from USA and UK, such as Raja Ram, DJ Chicago, etc. for getting more obvious information about 60’s and 70’s psychedelic music. Psychedelic Rock of 60’s? Yes, we know. Crazy raves of 80’s? We’ve been there.. Goa Trance? That’s our life…
And you know what we all realized? A huge gap in the development and establishment of psychedelic music from the middle of 70-s till the end of 80-s. None of us, neither one of the Old Dudes could remember any new genre appeared in that years, that could open people’s consciousness and lead it to its freedom.
“Poor freaks”! How they were living?! What they were doing?! And what did they listen to? These questions pushed us to make deeper research and activate some connections from Other World.
And we have found – what ruled the psychedelic society in that days.
 
ELECTRONIC PSY DUB
 
Dub is a genre of music which grew out of reggae music in the 1960s, and is commonly considered a subgenre, though it has developed to extend beyond the scope of reggae. Music in this genre consists predominantly of instrumental remixes of existing recordings and is achieved by significantly manipulating and reshaping the recordings, usually by removing the vocals from an existing music piece, and emphasizing the drum and bass parts (this stripped-down track is sometimes referred to as a 'riddim'). Other techniques include dynamically adding extensive echo, reverb, panoramic delay, and occasional dubbing of vocal or instrumental snippets from the original version or other works.
 
 
Dub was pioneered by Osbourne "King Tubby" Ruddock, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Errol Thompson and others in the late 1960s. Similar experiments with recordings at the mixing desk outside of the dancehall environment were also done by producers Clive Chin and Herman Chin Loy. These producers, especially Ruddock and Perry, looked upon the mixing console as an instrument, manipulating tracks to come up with something new and different. Dub has influenced many genres of music, including rock (most significantly the sub-genre of post-punk and other kinds of punk, pop, hip hop, disco, and later house, techno, ambient and trip hop.
 
Dub music is characterized by a "version" or "double" of an existing song, often instrumental, using B-sides of 45 RPM records and typically emphasizing the drums and bass for a sound popular in local sound systems. A "version" is a record with the vocals removed, the alternative cut of a song made for the deejay toast over the top. These "versions" were used as the basis of new songs by rerecording them with new elements. The instrumental tracks are typically drenched in sound effects such as echo, reverberation, with instruments and vocals dropping in and out of the mix. Another hallmark of the dub sound is the prominent use of bass guitar. The music sometimes features other noises, such as birds singing, thunder and lightning, water flowing, and producers shouting instructions at the musicians. It can be further augmented by live DJs. The many-layered sounds with varying echoes and volumes are often said to create soundscapes, or sound sculptures, drawing attention to the shape and depth of the space between sounds as well as to the sounds themselves. There is usually a distinctly organic feel to the music, even though the effects are electronically created.
A reason to experiment with mixing was rivalry among sound systems. Sound systems' sound men wanted the tracks they played at dances to be slightly different each time, so they would order numerous copies of the same record from a studio, each with a different mix.
 
Evolution of dub as a sub-genre.
 
By 1973, through the efforts of several independent and competitive innovators, engineers, and producers, instrumental reggae "versions" from various studios had evolved into "dub" as a sub-genre of reggae. Errol Thompson engineered the first strictly instrumental reggae album, entitled The Undertaker by Derrick Harriott and the Crystallites. This album was released in 1970. This innovative album credits "Sound Effects" to Derrick Harriott.
 
In 1973, at least three producers, Lee "Scratch" Perry and the Aquarius studio engineer/producer team of Herman Chin Loy and Errol Thompson simultaneously recognized that there was an active market for this new "dub" sound and consequently they started to release the first albums strictly consisting of dub. Lee "Scratch" Perry released Blackboard Jungle Dub in the spring of 1973. It is considered a landmark recording of this genre.
 
Dub has continued to evolve, its popularity waxing and waning with changes in musical fashion. Almost all reggae singles still carry an instrumental version on the B-side and these are still used by the sound systems as a blank canvas for live singers and DJs. In 1981 the Japanese band Mute Beat would create dub music using live instruments such as trumpets rather than studio equipment, and became a precursor to the acid jazz, ambient and trip hop music genres. They collaborated with numerous Jamaican artists such as King Tubby, Lee "Scratch" Perry and Gladstone Anderson amongst others and became a large influence upon future dub musicians.
 
In the 1980s, Britain became a new centre for dub production with Mikey Dread, Mad Professor and Jah Shaka being the most famous. It was also the time when dub made its influence known in the work of harder edged, experimental producers such as Mikey Dread with UB40 and The Clash, Adrian Sherwood and the roster of artists on his On-U Sound label. Many bands characterized as post-punk were heavily influenced by dub. Better-known bands such as The Police, The Clash and UB40 helped popularize Dub, with UB40's Present Arms In Dub album being the first dub album to hit the UK top 40.
 
Traditional dub nowadays has survived and some of the originators of dub such as Lee "Scratch" Perry and Mad Professor continue to produce new material. New artists continue to preserve the traditional dub sound, some with slight modifications but with a primary focus on reproducing the original characteristics of the sound in a live environment.
 
Medias:
 
Friday, 13 June 2014 05:07

Life and Death of Psychedelic Rock

Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that created a correct psycho-acoustic and music base in many of us. It inspired first trance musicians, otherwise early Goa Trance of would be never called Rock’n’roll of 90’s.
So, let’s see our roots. For this we have to make a time travel in the middle of last century. Have a good trip into the epoch of sex, drugs and…..
 
LIFE AND DEATH OF PSYCHEDELIC ROCK.
 
The Psychedelic scene was primarily a plethora of HIPPIES playing music to augment their LSD and hallucinatory experiences: in the 1960s, in the tradition of jazz and blues, many folk and rock musicians began to take drugs and included drug references in their songs.
The music that the hippies listened to was designed to enhance the MIND ALTERING EXPERIENCES of “Psychedelic” drugs (such as LSD or mescaline), characterized by (or generating): hallucinations, distortions of perception, altered states of awareness, and occasionally states resembling psychosis. The bands that made the music happen were seriously Psychedelic with colourful eyeball searing acid soaked album covers and trippy light shows with a whimsical SURREAL lyrical nature
 
The music had to have certain aspects to be good enough for the new psych generation of listeners: as a musical style Psychedelic rock often contains some of the following features:
- The electric guitars were DISTORTED with feedback, wah wah and fuzz boxes.
 
- The mixing in the studio was not just about putting down vocals and music, but very complex and elaborate effects were added such as backward tapes and long delay loops, panning and phasing sounds, extreme reverb on the guitars and the vocals, even vocals that were backmasked or fed through effects machines. THE MUSIC HAD TO SOUND OTHERWORLDLY AND OFF THE PLANET!!!
 
- The use of EXOTIC INSTRUMENTATION was a key factor particularly the sitar and tabla and other Eastern, or Indian musical instruments
 
- There was an EMPHASIS ON THE KEYBOARD that dominated the music at times, especially mellotron, electric organs and harpsichord.
 
To enhance the experience of tripping out the music too was replete with lengthy instrumental and jamming and improvisation with lead and keyboard soloing and extended musical passages with varying time signatures, like a multi movement suite of songs merged together into one LONG TRACK.
 
- The COMPLEX song structures depended on changes in key, modal melodies, drones and time signatures.
 
- THE LYRICS WERE SURREAL OR DREAMLIKE, ESOTERICALLY, inspired and based on fantasy or non-sensical, and at times whimsical and humorous. The most significant it’s maybe “white rabbit” (referred of ALICE IN WONDERLAND) by Jefferson Airplane
 
- Album covers featured trippy MULTI COLOURED IMAGES WITH PSYCHEDELIC REFERENCES.
 
- The concert performances were a light show to augment the music and LIQUID LIGHT SHOWS REPLICATED ACID TRIPS. Such as this one of Zappa and the Mothers of Inventions:
 
- the IMAGE OF THE BAND was transformed, no longer wearing suits like The Beatles, Kinks, Animals or the other British Invasion bands, but now wearing multi coloured mesmirising silk shirts and very long hair became the norm. (Pink Floyd with Syd Barret the master of psych)
 
 
Development in USA
 
The SAN FRANCISCO music scene continued to develop and The first Trips Festival held at the Longshoremen's Hall in January 1966, saw The Grateful Dead and Big Brother and the Holding Company play to an audience of 10,000, giving many their first encounter with both ACID ROCK, with its long instrumentals and unstructured jams, and LSD.
 
Psychedelic music also began to have an impact on pop music, with The Beach Boys under the leadership of Brian Wilson, who had been experimenting with LSD from 1965, and psychedelic sounds and lyrical hints were a major part of the songs on Pet Sounds (1966) and the single "Good Vibrations", one of the first pop records to use a THEREMIN (he controlling section usually consists of two metal antennae which sense the position of the player's hands and control oscillators for frequency with one hand, and volume with the other, so it can be played without being touched. The electric signals from the theremin are amplified and sent to a loudspeaker)
 
Although San Francisco was the centre of American psychedelic music scene, many other American cities contributed significantly to the new genre. Los Angeles boasted dozens of important psychedelic bands (Iron Butterfly, Love, Spirit, Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band, the United States of America, The West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band, and the Electric Prunes) perhaps the most commercially successful were The Doors. New York City produced its share of psychedelic bands, also Detroit, Texas and Chicago.
 
In America the SUMMER OF LOVE OF 1967 saw huge number of young people from across American and the world travel to the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco, boosting the population from 15,000 to around 100,000. It was prefaced by the Human Be-In event in March and reached its peak at the MONTEREY POP FESTIVAL in June, the latter helping to make major American stars of Janis Joplin, lead singer of Big Brother and the Holding Company, Jimi Hendrix and The Who.
 
 
Development in the UK
 
In the UK before 1967 media outlets for psychedelic culture were limited to PIRATE RADIO stations like Radio Luxembourg and Radio London, particularly the programmes hosted by DJ John Peel.
 
The growth of underground culture was facilitated by the emergence of alternative weekly publications like IT (International Times) and OZ magazine which featured psychedelic and progressive music together with the counter culture lifestyle, which involved long hair, and the wearing of wild shirts from shops (like Mr Fish, Granny Takes a Trip and old military uniforms from Carnaby Street in Soho and Kings Road in Chelsea boutiques, Britain's hippies comported themselves in stark contrast to the slick, tailored teddyboys (dandies) or the drab, conventional dress of most teenagers prior to that. Soon psychedelic rock clubs (like the UFO Club in Tottenham Court Road, Middle Earth Club in Covent Garden, The Roundhouse in Chalk Farm, the Country Club in Swiss Cottage and the Art Lab also in Covent Garden) were drawing capacity audiences with psychedelic rock and ground-breaking LIQUID LITH SHOWS.
 
British psychedelic rock, like its American counterpart, had roots in the folk scene. However, the largest strand was the series of acts emerged from 1966 from the BRITISH BLUES SCENE, but influenced by folk, jazz and psychedelia, including: Pink Floyd, Traffic, Soft Machine, Cream, and The Jimi Hendrix Experience (led by an American, but initially produced and managed in Britain by Chas Chandler of The Animals).
 
 
The Crazy World of Arthur Brown added surreal theatrical touches to its dark psychedelic sounds, such as the singer's flaming headdress. Existing British Invasion acts now joined the psychedelic revolution, including Eric Burdon (previously of The Animals), and The Small Faces and The Who whose The Who Sell Out (1967, in which are included psychedelic influenced tracks "I Can See for Miles" and "Armenia City in the Sky"). The Rolling Stones had drug references and psychedelic hints in their 1966 singles ("19th Nervous Breakdown" and "Paint It, Black", the latter featuring drones and sitar).
 
By the end of the decade psychedelic rock was in retreat. LSD had been made illegal in the US and UK from 1966. The murders of Sharon Tate and Leno and Rosemary LaBianca by Charles Manson and his "family" of followers, claiming to have been inspired by Beatles' Songs such as "Helter Skelter", has been seen as contributing to an anti-hippie backlash.
 
At the end of the year, the Altamont Free Concert in California, headlined by The Rolling Stones, became notorious for the fatal stabbing of black teenager Meredith Hunter by Hells Angel security guards.
 
Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones, Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac and Syd Barrett of Pink Floyd, were early "acid casualties", helping to shift the focus of the respective bands of which they had been leading figures.
 
Some bands like the Jimi Hendrix Experience and Cream broke up.
Jimi Hendrix died in London in September 1970, shortly after recording Band of Gypsies (1970), Janis Joplin died of a heroin overdose in October 1970 and they were closely followed by Jim Morrison of the Doors, who died in Paris in July 1971.
Many surviving acts moved away from psychedelia into either more back-to-basics "ROOTS ROCK", traditional-based, pastoral or whimsical folk, the wider experimentation of progressive rock, or riff-laden heavy rock.
MEDIA:
Friday, 13 June 2014 05:07

True Story of Goa Trance

After almost 20 years of boring pause in the development of trippy music at the beginning of 70’s, new sounds mixed up with thousands of micrograms and blew up the minds of the people and expanded their consciousness to its maximum level with the digital messages from outer Space. Without leaving for any of us even a little chance to come back into the Matrix. The sound of that music making our hearts beat together and feel that we are all ONE.

THE TRUE STRORY OF GOA TRANCE

Goa Trance is a sub-genre of electronic dance music – EDM which had started to take its form back in 80’s. However, the very first instigators, ideologists and style formers can be found even further in the past, more accurately – during the period of psychedelic rock in the 60’s and 70’s. Considering the name of this style, it’s easy to relate it with the Indian province called Goa, which is located on the western bank of India. The historical and cultural heritage of Goa is known world-wide, for it was a colony that was fought over during many periods in the past. The first conflicts in that region were between Hindu and Muslim population. These conflicts can be tracked to as far as 10th century, and they had continued all the way to the 16th century.


In the year of 1510, Portuguese colonists arrived to Goa. They made a great influence in this Indian province, which can be seen in numerous catholic churches and monasteries that were built during that time.
But, the Portuguese were not the only European nation that controlled Goa in the history. The British colonists occupied the region two times. The first period was from 1797. to 1798. and again from 1802. – 1813. During 1961. Indian army seized control over Goa, and integrated it into the sovereign country of India. Multi-cultural history of Goa has its place in history of Goa Trance genre, especially when we point out the very first parties that were organized on the beaches of Goa during the 60’s.

According to Ray Castle (one of the first DJs in Goa) the first colonists were hippies which were coming to India seeking spirituality. The second important factor which mostly attracted Europeans (and Americans) to this region was that there was no legal limitation to the consuming of hashish.

This was a fact until the mid-70’s when the US government pressed the issue on Indian authorities to ban this practice. Early history of the pioneers of Goa and their first parties was never documented, but according to some witnesses (who were hippies at that time), the first Goa parties were organized in 1968. thanks to eight-finger Eddie who was probably the first modern settler on the beaches of Goa. Together with his friends, he discovered beautiful beaches and got friendly with the local villagers, which gave them a feeling of absolute freedom and happiness, which they had expressed through consuming psychedelic drugs and dancing on the beach

The music at that time did not have any relations to the style of Goa trance, or even with electronic music in general, but the philosophy which they were following is almost the same as the one that Goa trance followers are sharing today. The music that had to do with Goa parties back then was more related to bands like Grateful Dead, The Doors, The Eagles, and Pink Floyd. Fred Disko was one of the first DJs in Goa who started to promote electronic music as well. After all, that decision gave him his “Disko” pseudonym.
Besides Fred Disko, there was earlier mentioned Ray Castle, and Goa Gil, who promoted rock/fusion during the 70’s. Later, in the 80’s, Goa Gil started to promote Goa influenced electronic music too, and he gave it a rather “simple” name: the first post-punk experimental electronic dance music coming from Europe, the neue deutsche welle, electronic body music.

 
Ray Castle explained that the very first form of Goa Trance sound could be recognized with bands/projects like Nitzer Ebb, Front 242, Frontline Assembly. Fred Disko also mentioned the influence of classical-traditional Indian music which was easily recognized in Goa trance sound.
The symbiosis of these rather different influences was inevitable. The reasons of that symbiosis become very clear, especially when you imagine 10 tablas, 6 sitars and an Indian female vocalist performing a song in the repetitive way, so that you can actually feel like flying.
Fred Disko and Ray Cole said that the contemporary “scene” in Goa was formed from a handful of DJs who were mostly people from France, Italy, Germany, Netherlands and Switzerland.
 
The main goal was to exchange and collect the music which was brought from Europe. They were all trying to obtain hard-to-get rare music as much as they could. They also wanted to have rarities which sounded more psychedelic.
These quests were labelled as “The quest for weird psychedelic music”. The great part of their inspiration was hidden within the consummation of LSD, the drug which became a symbol of Goa parties, especially because it was easy to get, and mostly free of charge. It was known as “free acid punch”
 
DJs of the late 80’s had often used DATs for their DJ sets, but the preparations for the show were hard and time-consuming. According to Steve Psyko (he was also one of the first Goa DJs), the DJs would often cut-out the parts of the songs mixing them with other tracks, in order to create a mega-mix which would be played at the parties later on.
 
The use of vinyl records was not practiced because of the risk that the vinyl could actually melt due to high temperatures. Ray Castle recalls one time when DJ Sven Vath came to Goa with all his records, in order to become “Techno pope of India”. However, that didn’t work out well, because you just have to be used to DATs on such high temperatures.

Paul Chambers (British Goa trance DJ) recalls his trips to Goa and the very first electronic music parties that were held there. There were no more than 200 people on those events. The decorations were really colourful but not numerous and there were a few black-light lamps around. The first police raids occurred during the 1990. but the situation became better in 1991. and 1992.  It was during these years, that the first hype and rush to Goa had started.
 
The number of people on parties noticeably increased, and the numbers were from 500 to 1500 visitors. More and more people were coming to Goa, especially from Israel and Japan. With the increasing number of tourists that arrived to Goa to dance, consume drugs and live a free life, the whole underground feeling started to fade, and the music itself started to become more and more popular.
This was even more supported by numerous English and other European DJs and publishers, which resulted in first releases in the 1993. 
The release which was probably the most influential for Goa trance uprising was the Project II Trance, released by Dragonfly Records. This release featured artists like Gumbo, Genetic, The Infinity Project, Total Eclipse, Mandra Gora and others.

Except for Goa trance in India, parties started to occur in other parts of the world, and the most known ones were in Byron Bay (Australia), where many hippies found their new place for Goa trance, since more and more tourists were visiting Goa and the scene was booming. In England, the first Goa trance parties were organized in London and Manchester. It was interesting that almost the very same DJs performed in Goa and in England, and the visitors were mostly the same in the both areas. It was just a matter of season where the caravan will be settled.


 


 

The music in that period (1993-1999) was characterized as psychedelic trance-dance. That term was mentioned even earlier and it was often used as a title for parties. The tracks became longer than earlier, so the average track was around 8.30 minutes, and the tempo was around 145 BPM (beats per minute). Generally, the BPM range can vary from 120 to 160. The structure of tracks mostly had the same pattern, so almost every track had an atmospheric intro, 4/4 rhythm which was followed by oriental and eastern melodies, acid sounds (the legendary TB303) and vocal samples (mostly taken from SF movies

The climax of the track would usually emerge around 5th minute, although some tracks didn’t follow that pattern. Iconography on parties, CD covers and T-shirts was mostly related to Hindu and Buddhist motifs.
 
There were also science-fiction motives (mostly aliens, UFOs and other characters), colourful psychedelic fractals and drawings.
The end of Goa trance music occurred in the period between 1998./1999  with the newly formed psy trance sound which was rather minimalistic comparing to Goa trance, containing less melodies, shorter bass lines and sharper kicks with emphasis on psychedelic sound effects. Many Goa trance projects started to fade, while others formed within the psytrance genre.
 
Although, some other projects kept their former names while they adjusted their production to the present trend.
 
One of such examples is a legendary Goa trance project – Etnica. Many publishers also followed the change, and one of the biggest trance labels, TIP records was renamed to TIP World. TIP Records used to publish Goa trance (The Infinity Project, Doof, Psychopod...) while TIP World started to publish new projects like GMS, Logic Bomb, 1200 Mics, and others.
 


After Goa trance found its place in electronic music scene, many new artists, publishers and DJs had emerged. It would take a lot of time to mention all of the names which took part in the scene during the six golden years of Goa trance (1993-1999). Because of that, we will mention only some of them:

RECORD LABELS :

Dragonfly
Perfecto Fluoro
Flying Rhino
Blue Room Released
Matsuri Productions
TIP Records
Symbiosis
Krembo
BooM
Platipus
RETURN TO THE SOURCE
PSYCHIC DELI
Phantasm
Transient
PHONOKOL

Saturday, 05 April 2014 17:30

Page 5: Freaksfiles - Flower Power Movement

When we say Peace – we mean No War. For us it is one of the most important and necessary conditions to feel it all- love, freedom, happiness, harmony. To enjoy the life, to travel, to be the citizenships of the World.
40 years ago during the Cold War, when the Planet was on the edge of a global conflict between East and West, when the governments spend billions on the militarization, nuclear weapons development and military actions around the globe, was born a new ideology. Naïve but optimistic movement started between hippies in USA combined the philosophical ideas of famous freedom fighters and pacifists, such as Mahathma Ghandi, Sidhartha and even Timothy Leary.
 

Today we will open some unknown Files and tell you the true story of
FLOWER POWER MOVEMENT.
 
This famous photograph was taken on October,21 of 1967 at the March on Washington to protest the Vietnam War. More than 100,000 people gathered in Washington D.C. for that peaceful Vietnam War protest, including an 18-year-old aspiring actor named George Harris. A contingent of 2,500 Army troops wielding M-14 guns surrounded the Pentagon, cordoning off the crowd from the protected building. Undeterred, the protestors stood their ground, crowding in mere inches away from the weapons. Embracing the flower power ethos of non-violence, Harris calmly inserted the stem of a carnation into a soldier's gun barrel.
 
Photographer Bernie Boston, working at the time for the Washington Star newspaper, captured Harris' flower power action on film. Although the image didn't receive immediate attention, it has since come to symbolize the counterculture that rallied around non-violent Vietnam protests. That type of attention-grabbing, yet peaceful, revolt against the government and military was exactly what counterculture leaders had envisioned as the ideal way to deliver their antiwar message to mainstream America. Granted, the Youth International Party (Yippie) organizers of that October 1967 Pentagon march also tried -- and failed -- to levitate and exorcise the military complex, in an effort to rid it of the evil spirits they believed were fuelling the Vietnam War. But their ultimate goal of ending the combat and sending troops home was straightforward and practical in retrospect.
 
After the Pentagon march, the carnation-clad George Harris hit the road and headed West to the epicentre of the flower power movement. In San Francisco, Harris joined the masses of other youth looking to follow LSD guru Timothy Leary's advice to "tune in, turn off and drop out," (or, in other words, drop out of school and drop acid instead). There, in the Haight-Ashbury district, a short stroll from Golden Gate Pak, flower power flourished to its fullest during the summer of 1967 and soon withered away. But while marijuana smoke has clouded its legacy, and psychedelic swirls and outlandish fashion obscured its essence, flower power began as an attempt to provide clarity as the 1960s societal haze brought on by the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War set in.
 
Flower power is a phrase likely coined by Alan Ginsberg in 1965, and it referred the hippie notion of “make love not war,” and the idea that love and nonviolence, such as the growing of flowers, was a better way to heal the world than continued focus on capitalism and wars.
 
Flower power also became a term used to express the hippie culture itself, and hippies were often called flower children. The power of the group left an indelible impression on American society. Large groups of teens and young adults who donned flowers in their hair, painted them on their vans, and lived together in semi-communes, often outdoors in the parks of major cities, did have a certain amount of power as a group. In the best sense, this power seeped into mainstream public views advancing civil rights. Conversely, the counterculture movement that can be called flower power had many unintended consequences: unwanted pregnancy, drug addiction, the large scale importation of drugs and development of the drug cartels, and the sexual revolution which would to a degree create the rapid spread of HIV infection in the early 1980s.
 
Luridly painted flowers on vans, record covers, and the like were also symbolic of the hippies’ advocacy of hallucinogens in the hopes of creating greater self-awareness, a practice not uncommon in other cultures, especially in the past. When hallucinogens were used, visual hallucinations frequently occurred, and things with intense color appeared even more intense. If you look at a film like The Yellow Submarine first released in 1968, there are many visual moments that would definitely have had more impact on people taking drugs like acid and LSD.
 
The film also has numerous images of flowers growing, sprouting and suddenly covering bare landscapes that suggest the spread of the flower power movement, though the term flower power isn’t used in the film. However, the end song of the movie is intricately tied to this movement: “All You Need Is Love.” The idea of the growth of love, the natural progress of love, and the power of love ties in well with actions taken by the hippies like the planting of flowers in bare lots in Berkeley in 1969 during a two-week occupation by the US National Guard.
 
The idea of using flowers to express a movement gets at the heart of hippie identity. Stress was on acts of civil disobedience that were nonviolent. What could be more nonviolent than distributing flowers to National Guard members, or planting flowers in empty lots? The simplicity of the flower, its ties to the earth and natural origin, and its beauty were all things this counterculture movement wanted to remain close to. In the end, there’s a beauty and grace to the flower power movement, even though it ultimately did end badly for more than a few people. Like many movements which may have many good intentions, certain aspects, like an emphasis on drug use, contributed to its destruction.
 
Like any flower, the flower power movement grew for a time in the mid to late 1960s, and then withered by the early 1970s.
 
The legends, myths, mysteries from Hippies till nowadays will be published here to introduce you the history of establishment of World's Psychedelic Culture: Years before Leary made headlines for his Ivy League adventures, and years before Ken Kesey held the first acid parties in the forests of the Pacific Northwest, a young doctor named Stanislav Grof was conducting rigorous clinical experiments involving LSD in the most unlikely of places: a government lab in the capital of communist Czechoslovakia. It was there, at Prague's Psychiatric Research Institute in the 1950s, that Grof began more than half-a-century of pioneering research into non-ordinary states of consciousness. While he is frequently marginalized in, if not completely left out of, popular psychedelic histories, it is not for any lack of contribution to the field.
 
"If I am the father of LSD," Albert Hoffman once said, "Stan Grof is the godfather.”
With psychedelic research poised for a mainstream resurgence, the time seems right to begin giving the godfather his due.
How Stanislav Grof Helped Launch the Dawn of a New Psychedelic Research Era.
 
Stanislav Grof had just completed his medical studies at Prague's Charles University when he caught a life-changing break. It was 1956, and one of his professors, a brain specialist named George Roubicek, had ordered a batch of LSD-25 from the Swiss pharmaceutical company Sandoz, where Albert Hoffman first synthesized the compound in 1943. Roubicek had read the Zurich psychiatrist Werner Stoll's 1947 account of the LSD experience and was curious to test it out himself and on his students and patients, largely to study the drug's effects on electric brain waves, Roubicek's specialty. When he asked for volunteers, Grof raised his hand.
 
The subsequent experience assured Grof's place in history by making him among the first handful of people to enjoy what might be called a modern trip, in which the psychedelic state is matched with electronic effects of the kind that have defined the experience for generations of recreational acidheads, from Merry Pranksters to Fillmore hippies to lollipop-sucking ravers.
 
Roubicek's experiment involved placing Grof in a dark room, administering a large dose of LSD (around 250 millionths of a gram) and turning on a stroboscopic white light oscillating at various, often frenetic, frequencies. Needless to say, nothing like the experience was otherwise available in 1950s Czechoslovakia, or anywhere else, for that matter. That first introduction to LSD -- a "divine thunderbolt" -- set the course for Grof's lifework. He had found, he thought, a majestic shortcut on Freud's "royal road to the unconscious.”
 
"This combination [of the light and the drug]," Grof later said, "evoked in me a powerful mystical experience that radically changed my personal and professional life. Research of the heuristic, therapeutic, transformative, and evolutionary potential of non-ordinary states of consciousness became my profession, vocation, and personal passion."
 
In medical school during the second half of the '50s, Grof underwent dozens of LSD sessions and became one of a handful of turned-on young people in the communist world. Upon his graduation in 1960, Grof began full-time clinical work when he was fortuitously assigned to Prague's Psychiatric Research Institute, which included a newly launched Psychedelic Research Center. Among his new colleagues was a young doctor named Milos Vojtechovsky, with whom Grof had conducted his earliest experiments as a medical student. In 1958, the duo employed Benactyzin, high doses of which are hallucinogenic, as a way to induce the psychotic state associated with acute alcohol withdrawal. In 1959, they wrote an LSD-related study of the brain's serotonergic system, titled, "Serotonin and Its Significance for Psychiatry." As professional colleagues in the early 1960s, Grof and Vojtechovsky would co-publish nearly two dozen pioneering papers on clinical experiments employing LSD and other psychedelics, including a three-part study on LSD's clinical history, biochemistry and pharmacology.
 
Until 1961, this research involved Sandoz-supplied LSD. But Grof saw no reason why Czech scientists shouldn't be producing a native supply. Fatefully situated approximately 200 miles from Prague at this time was the Czech pharmaceutical company Spofa, whose chemists were talented synthesizers of various ergot alkaloids. Grof put in a request for the company begin producing LSD; a request quickly approved by communist authorities. Soon thereafter began production of the only pharmaceutically pure LSD in the eastern bloc. (Sandoz was still producing the only pure LSD in the West.)
The early weeks of Czechoslovak LSD production were not without problems. As Spofa cranked up its line for the powerful psychedelic, its laboratory employees would sometimes accidentally absorb the compound through their fingertips, much as Albert Hoffman did when he inadvertently made his famous discovery. Whenever this happened, it was standard practice at the time to inject the subject with Thorazine and throw them into the nearest locked hospital ward. This often made a bad situation worse, and Spofa frantically turned to Grof for answers. The young doctor happily lectured them on the importance of "set and setting" in the psychedelic experience. "I assured them that there was no reason for alarm if someone was intoxicated by LSD," Grof later wrote. "They were advised to have a special, quiet room where the intoxicated individual could spend the rest of the day listening to music in the company of a good friend."
 
Spofa brass took Grof's advice. When a 19-year-old Spofa lab assistant experienced a substantial "professional intoxication," she was placed in a comfortable room with a colleague and music. When the drug wore off, the woman reported having "the time of her life."
 
As Grof rose through the ranks at the Psychiatric Institute, his research increasingly involved using LSD in tandem with traditional Freudian psychoanalysis, in which Grof earned his Ph.D from the Czech Academy of Sciences in 1965. His dissertation was titled, "LSD and Its Use in Psychiatric Clinical Practice." When Grof completed his Freudian training, he had nearly a decade of experience with LSD. At 34, he was also full of paradigm-shifting ambition, having decided that psychedelics "used responsibly and with proper caution, would be for psychiatry what the microscope is for biology and medicine or the telescope is for astronomy."
 
It was a heady time for any young Czech with a head full of big ideas. In 1965, Czechoslovakia was then in the midst of a political and cultural thaw known as the Prague Spring. A relaxation of state control and communist mores was encouraging new forms of artistic and political expression. Filmmakers associated with Czech New Wave produced exuberant films; the cafes and theaters became hubs of a thriving youth subculture, which celebrated Allen Ginsberg "King of May" when he visited Prague in May 1965. Had the trajectory been allowed to continue, it is easy to imagine a psychedelic Czech youth culture taking form, just as it did in the United States, with Grof as its leader.
 
Alas, Moscow saw where the Prague Spring was heading, and crushed the flowering under the treads of Red Army tanks. But by the time the Russians rolled into Prague in August 1968, the country's most experienced psychedelic researcher was long gone. The year before, Grof had been offered a professorship at the University of Maryland. He arrived in America during the Summer of Love in possession of one of the world's deepest LSD research resumes.
Soon after his arrival in the U.S., Grof was named chief of research at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. Again, it was a fortuitous placement. Among his new peers, an ordained minister and fellow psychedelic pioneer named Walter Pahnke, who had conceived of the famous "Good Friday Experiment" with Tim Leary and Huston Smith while at Harvard in the early 1960s. At the time of Grof's arrival, Pahnke was engaged in promising research into LSD therapy as a way to mitigate mortal anxiety among the terminally ill. Before Pahnke's untimely death in 1971, he had found "dramatic improvement" among a third of his subjects, and "moderate improvement" in another third.
 
While the Center was a stimulating environment to continue his research, Grof's Maryland work constituted the lesser half of his activities during the late 1960s. He also traveled regularly to Menlo Park, California, where he participated in a working group led by the founder of humanistic psychology, Abraham Maslow. Grof joined a coterie of Maslow's colleagues and students working to build on the foundation of humanistic psychology, most famous for its positing of a hierarchy of needs.
 
Like so many other forward thinkers of the decade, psychedelic experiences had touched Maslow deeply. He had come to believe that the system he developed in the '50s and early '60s was formed around a stunted view of the psyche. With his humanistic psychology, Maslow had managed to go beyond Freud and Skinner (the father of behaviorism), but he did not go as far enough. The spiritual revolution of the decade, of which the LSD experience was central, had thrown the limits of humanistic psychology into sharp relief. It was, Maslow and Grof believed, still too trapped in Freudian verbal therapy, still too accepting of the idea of an individual psyche contained in one life, one skull, one personal history, one culture.
 
"The renaissance of interest in Eastern spiritual philosophies, various mystical traditions, meditation, ancient and aboriginal wisdom, as well as the widespread psychedelic experimentation during the stormy 1960s," Grof later wrote, "made it absolutely clear that a comprehensive and cross-culturally valid psychology had to include observations from such areas as mystical states; cosmic consciousness; psychedelic experiences; trance phenomena; creativity; and religious, artistic, and scientific inspiration."
 
As Maslow and Grof mapped out this new and expanded understanding of the psyche, they turned to the insights of Carl Jung, the brilliant Freudian renegade who posited the existence of non-material archetypal-mythological realms that contain the entire histories, collective wisdom, and totemic icons of every civilization since the dawn of time. Along with a belief in these realms, Maslow and Grof were convinced they were accessible to everyone, especially during non-ordinary states of consciousness such as those induced by a hefty dose of psychedelics.
 
Just as transpersonal psychology was being institutionalized, LSD research was being systematically shut down by the government. At the end of the 1960s, Grof's laboratory in Maryland housed the last surviving FDA-approved psychedelic clinical research program in the United States. In 1971, Maryland's research, too, was ordered closed following the classification of LSD as a Schedule-I drug, defined as being habit-forming and having "no recognized medicinal value."
 
With little interest in running a lab without access to LSD, Grof followed the action and moved west. In 1973, he began a 15-year stretch as scholar-in-residence at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur. There, overlooking the Pacific ocean and against the constant rumble of rolling surf, Grof spent the next two years synthesizing his thoughts on nearly two decades of LSD therapy. The result was Realms Of The Human Unconscious: Observations From LSD Research , published in 1975.
 
By this time, officially sanctioned psychedelic research already seemed like a distant memory. For a new generation that graduated college after the door had been slammed shut on clinical psychedelic studies, Grof's book was a window into a world that might have been. Among those who found inspiration in the book was a young college student named Rick Doblin, who would later found the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies.
With the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980, the possibility of a return to a rational discussion of drug policy and psychedelic research became more remote than ever. Grof was among those who kept the flame alive. Around the time of Reagan's first Inauguration, Grof published LSD Psychotherapy , in which he expanded on the now codified transpersonal understanding of the psyche. Grof stressed the importance of two previously neglected realms of experience that psychedelic experiences can tap into where traditional therapy cannot: the "perinatal" (birth moment) and "transpersonal" (archetypical). Coming to terms with these aspects of the psyche, believed Grof, is the key to psycho-spiritual health.
 
"When the content of the perinatal level of the unconscious surfaces into consciousness and is adequately processed and integrated," Grof wrote, "it results in a radical personality change. The individual experiences a considerable decrease of aggressive tendencies and becomes more tolerant and compassionate toward others. [They also experience an increase in] the ability to enjoy life and draw satisfaction from simple situations such as everyday activity, eating, love-making, nature, and music."
 
Happy, well-adjusted people, Grof believed, also lead to happy, well-adjusted societies.
 
"One of the most remarkable consequences of various forms of transpersonal experiences is spontaneous emergence and development of genuine humanitarian and ecological interests and need to take part in activities aimed at peaceful coexistence and well-being of humanity," Grof wrote. "This is based on an almost cellular understanding that any boundaries in the Cosmos are relative and arbitrary and that each of us is, in the last analysis, identical and commeasurable with the entire fabric of existence. As a result of these experiences, individuals tend to develop feelings that they are planetary citizens and members of the human family before belonging to a particular country or a specific racial, social, ideological, political, or religious group."
 
Such sentiments were never so far removed from mainstream culture as during the first few years of the age of Reagan. Buffered from the harder edges of the 1980s in Big Sur, Grof kept working, increasingly with his wife and creative partner, Christina. In 1985, he published Beyond the Brain: Birth, Death, and Transcendence , in which he expanded on the promise and power of transpersonal psychotherapy employing psychedelic drugs.
By the time the book's second edition was published in 1994, a mini-psychedelic revival was underway on the West Coast. Grof had earned enough stripes to be an acid elder statesman to a generation of kids dancing to techno on ecstasy and acid. But he did not embrace the role. While Tim Leary rolled around in mutual embrace with the San Francisco rave and cyberculture scenes, Grof maintained his distance, playing the role of austere friend of psychedelics from the old school. "The hectic atmosphere of…crowded rock concerts or discos, and noisy social gatherings are certainly not settings conducive to productive self-exploration and safe confrontation with the difficult aspects of one's unconscious," Grof stiffly wrote in a 1994 update of his essay "Crisis Intervention in Situations Related to Unsupervised Use of Psychedelics."
 
Grof had in any case by then found a way to continue his research without banned substances. Throughout the 1980s, he had been coming to the conclusion that perinatal and transpersonal experiences were not dependent on the use of psychedelics. LSD may have launched Grof's mind into cosmic orbit. But once there, like so many who passed through the psychedelic crucible, he had come to believe they were no longer needed. He even developed a system to prove it: Holotropic Breathing.
 
Grof's lifework treats individual and social neuroses through the exploration of non-ordinary states of consciousness. Whether these states are achieved through the structured hyperventilation of Holotropic Breathing, or through psychedelic drugs, for Grof the stakes remain the same.
 
"If we continue using the old strategies that have caused the current global crisis and which are in their consequences destructive and self-destructive," Grof recently wrote, "it might lead to annihilation of modern civilization and possibly even the human species. However, if a sufficient number of people undergo a process of inner psycho spiritual transformation and attain a higher level of awareness, we might in the future reach a situation when we will deserve the name, which we have so proudly given to our species: Homo sapiens."
 
This, in a nutshell, is the same cosmically ambitious hope expressed by the psychedelic pioneers of a half-century ago. Most of those men and women have long since given up the dream, moved on to other things, or died. Stanislav Grof is among the very few still here
 
 
 
The legends, myths, mysteries from Hippies till nowadays will be published here to introduce you the history of establishment of World's Psychedelic Culture
 
Psychedelic Pop Culture of the 60’s
 
Today we will observe a history and a fact of the influence of psychedelic culture of 60’s into American Pop Culture. Very cognitive and insightful article for those who do not consider trance music and modern party fashion as the only attractions of World’s Psychedelia.
 
 
SEX, DRUGS AND ROCK’N’ROLL
 
A guy walks into a bar, orders a beer and chats with the barkeeper. It’s midnight and the guy has nothing to do, since he has no family, girlfriend or any other responsibility. Later on, he would raise his voice to the barkeeper, claiming something about today’s music industry, how he used to write pages about rock bands for the Rolling Stone magazine, and ended up in a job where you had to write about certain boy bands people enjoyed to listen. One of the greatest Rock journalist Lester Bangs, maybe suffered from a lack of period or excitement that shaped millions of people, “To hell with them!” he would shout, in this old, cheap bar where you could listen songs of The Animals, if you were lucky.

What I want to type of understanding the Pop/Psychedelic Culture in U.S. is the acceptance and “adopting process” of hanging out around a certain musical aesthetic. In other words, it is the manifestation of the individual against the “outside”, to dress and behave, to act and think the way he/she wants. This kind of manifestation could be derived political or economical, but it follows a certain style and genre of music and produces essentially a certain “subculture” and we call it “Hippies” who is involved of this. At this point, it would be essential to understand the relationship between “physical-symbolic space” and “public moral panics”. Since subcultures are considered to locate in certain areas, it would be quite proper to say that there’s a relation of “us” and “them”, what we can also call as “the ghetto” and “the public space”. The essential conclusion of subcultures is that, it causes “public moral panics” and anxiety among societies. We begin to fear about something, if we don’t know what it is.

Regarding the sixties, it could be said that the assassination against J.F.K in 1963 started a sparkle against violence, war and politics. This sort of “common sense” was among young people who were persistently against the current government and which would be progress with the period of Lyndon B. Johnson. Moreover, the war in Vietnam was the starting point for the youth culture (Hippies) which took place in 1963 as well. In this sense, we should regard Pop music as a package of certain socio-political developments, which shaped the lyrics, live performance and positions of the artists.

It would be vital to remind that the American Pop/Psychedelic Culture found its actual potency in the mid-sixties: The first factor was Bob Dylan, a young rebellion, songwriter, poet and an active protester who was trying to say something about the war in Vietnam and American society. His second album “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan” in 1963 was a big hit in American culture and offered a new way of writing and protesting. Songs like “Masters of War”, “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall” and “Blowing in the Wind” was a marvelous rise of a togetherness in pointing the middle finger to old generations and of course, to Vietnam. Just for the records, I would not like to continue with Bob Dylan, but it would be fair enough to know that Dylan could be regarded as the first sparkle in Pop music, in terms of not only playing a song for entertainment, but also to stand against “something” and to embrace music with a package of ideas. This was a concept, a new brand idea of typing lyrics to make money and to show people what actually could going to happen.

The second factor was the rise of the Beatles, again in 1962-63: They were from Liverpool and started a new subculture and life-style. The Beatlemania Culture was very effective in terms of fanaticism and in Pop culture. Their rise were progressing in a short run, people were somehow crazy about these four handsome good-looking guys. The screaming, the love, the requirement and the fanaticism were rising in a high level and couldn’t be stopped. The media started a new assertion in 1964, that the Beatles could be even more popular than Jesus Christ. Religious people were highly against the music of the Beatles and arranged even plenty of mass protests to break and burn all Beatles records. In a short time, the discussion progressed into different subjects: One man says “If people would give the same interest to Jesus Christ, maybe he wouldn’t die,” and another says “Jesus would be very offended if he’d saw all this Beatles crap!” We can easily say that American Beatlemania soon reached the proportions of religious idolatry in 1964 and the arrival of the Beatles in the United States was even more affective, since American culture was regarded in sort of a progressing freedom speech and a better enunciatively opportunities.

In the article of Barbara Ehrenreich, Elizabeth Hess and Gloria Jacob’s “Beatlemania: A sexually defiant consumer subculture”, we witness a huge and frightened fanaticism about Pop music and Beat generation. It states in one line that someone got hold of the hotel pillowcases that had purportedly been used by the Beatles, cut them into 160,000 tiny squares, mounted them on certificates, and sold them for one dollar apiece. There’s an interesting star-centered hysteria in what we cannot describe it only through pop music: Pop culture, as I mentioned, is a great package of a certain life-style and defiance for older generations. In 1954, only ten years ago of the Beatlemania, girls who had screamed for Frank Sinatra had grown up to be responsible, settled to be housewives. We now arrive to our essential motivation of the sixties in Pop/Psychedelic Culture: Taboos were regarded old-fashioned and should be destroyed immediately as possible as it could and re-fill it with a new life-style.

At this point, it would be vital to say that “sexual depression” was also an important point of the rising Pop/Psychedelic Culture in the 60’s. It is interesting that pop culture embodied through music a self-referential relation against the individual. Despite the fact that music was also considered as a huge political expression against the state, but we cannot change the essential truth that both in the 60’s and 10’s, pop music has always captured dominantly a “self-referential” sense against individuals. So it makes sense when we say that subcultures should be examined by its own understanding and fashion. And moreover, the own understanding of one individual causes an “unknown image” against the “outside”. Both sides are not quite sure what they are expecting from each other: Music for the “outside” starts to sound irritating and annoying, while on the other hand, subcultures define themselves or makes references through pop music in sake of understanding the acceptance of the “adopting process” in order to define as well, their own life-style and common sense.

In the same subject but different artistic position, pop icon, painter and filmmaker Andy Warhol maybe was the most important symbolic figure, in breaking down sexual taboos and expressing an artistic work free as possible. He is also known as the movement of pop art and his “factory” which he usually used for his own ground area, film productions and fashion shoots. His paintings were appreciated, but as an avant-garde filmmaker, Warhol’s works were regarded amoral, disturbing and sexually exaggerated. Traditional authority figures, Conservatists, large group of families and institutions were highly against and disturbed, especially in a movie which four people tries to make erect a horse with their hands. This exaggeration of artistic expression was not derived only by a choice, but also as a question of to be anxious in saying “What if do these movies?” As we can see, artistic visions were shaped in trying to make something among the “unknown” and to present it as “immoral codes” to say that pop culture will change your life.

For years, the general anxiety of traditional authority figures for youth cultures and pop music could be considered as the threat of “self and social-destructive” fact. In this sense, we should add that pop music in both generations is being considered through images, lyrics and attitudes of the artists. It is quite normal in this sense, when a parent watches Jim Morrison on T.V. and says to his child: “Don’t make drugs!” Because the whole package of subcultures are always been examined by its own characteristic features. And in the center of Pop culture lays music, synonymously to “pleasure”. Moral monitors feel that pleasure should be policed, since our way of understanding the political world is highly connected to how and for whom we vote and support to.

Brett Ingram claims that “the personal is political”, suggests the idea that attitudes toward major social issues are conditioned by the emotional reactions. This is important to explain the importance of pop music, since emotional reactions are highly linked to songs: The high degree of usage in drugs in the sixties was beyond an issue of the state. Marijuana and LSD had an important role in shaping the worldviews of young people which progressed in arts, music, literature, fashion and philosophy. Especially in music, artists like pop/rock icons Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison and John Lennon was an essential reference in understanding the process of the subculture “Hippie”.

There’s no specific definition for the Hippies, since it contains other subdivisions as nudist groups, vegetarians, communes or drug groups. But we can easily assure that the Hippie Culture was an important part of pop culture, regarding its changing development in fashion, literature, music and philosophy. As I mentioned: Values and ideas, ritual communications, the rhythmic cycle of ghetto life, marijuana, LSD and other characteristic features involved and highly shaped the pop culture.

Though drugs and music couldn’t affect young people without any experience; in other words, there should be an actual support to “make it live” in the daily life. At this point, nightclubs and discotheques were maybe the most essential feature in pop culture. Clubs like Whisky a Go-Go and The Matrix were the standpoint and common curiosity of the 60’s generation: These places were usually adopted by hippies, beats and barely rock critics for the sake of the rising music genre psychedelic. After the mid-sixties, we witness that pop music congregate with psychedelic music, a genre which we can define as using new recording techniques and drawing a chartless discipline, usually sourced by non-Western, Indian influences. So, let us put together what we drew above: From the beginning of the article, we drew a more “innocent era” from 1962 to 65’, a rising culture of struggling in it’s own curiosity and breaking the chains of a the old-fashioned, conservatists idealism. The real fun begins after the mid-sixties, maybe with Bob Dylan’s choice of getting rid from folk music and embracing the electronic music. And of course, the changing image of the Beatles, their sixth album Rubber Soul, Revolver in 66’ and Abbey Road in 69’ were the most essential albums in pop music: It wasn’t the best albums in pop/psychedelic genre, but it was a proof that pop music could turn into other genres, music and as we know, sub-cultures.

The era of putting two hands to cheeks and screaming as loud as possible was over. The increasing use of drugs in the daily life after 65’ was the main potential reason for young people. Nevertheless, this crowd was the same crowd, the one who screamed for the Beatles and kissed his girlfriend in front of his family and regarded as a huge step for the sake of “change”. He faced with a new culture and learned in short time that there was a place called the Whisky A Go-Go. This nightclub, located in Los Angeles, was the most popular place to see bands like The Doors, Jefferson Airplane, Jimi Hendrix and other essential pop/rock/psychedelic bands. As it mentioned above, drugs and music couldn’t affect young people without experience and entering to the Whisky A Go-Go was the best experience for the 60’s generation. The overwhelming sound system, “trippy” lightning, colorful costumes, free-form dancing and the countless usage of LSD provided a huge and frightening common sense to young people, that somehow, without any specific reason and meaning, nothing would stay the same until the opening gates of Whisky A Go-Go.

The psychedelic genre made a good friendship with pop music. It provided politically a more affective protest image, it frightened the majority of the States, their moves and motivations were went out from an innocent sense, re-placed it with a louder and complex sound. But first and foremost, it affected the relation of the teenagers with their families. For example, known as the Go-Go Dancers were symbolically regarded as a reaction to old-fashioned family system and simpler, the changing understanding of “having fun”. Go-Go Dancers dance in a cage and their moves are free as possible, even “strange” for one who dances usually with standard moves. There’s an interesting paradox: Dancing in a cage limits your dancing, but under the circumstances of a certain ethically limitation of the family makes you no other option. You start to dance as wild as possible, but you are still aware that you are in a cage and cannot be escape. This symbolic criticism of the entertainment business was progressed and introduced by people who were highly involved around radical protesters, idealists and artists like Andy Warhol and counting the drug usage into daily life by Timothy Leary.

We witness that teenagers in the 60’s had the difficulty to make embrace their new life-styles to their families. “Rock & Roll and Pop, with its sound, styles, and culture (including fashions, hairstyles, dances, etc.), helped promote generational solidarity. This does not mean the pop generation had a monolithic culture. Far from it. Numerous subcultures existed within the youth culture. Like the rest of society, teens divided along economic, racial, cultural, religious, ethnic, and geographic lines. Some like pop rock; others loved country rock; still others listened only R & B rock. Sometimes pop music and rock and roll even became the locus of confrontation between disparate youth groups struggling for control of the music. But these subcultures were all part of the larger youth culture which was quite distinct from the adult culture. And rock and pop music was one of the main boundaries separating the teenagers from adults.”

It is interesting to see that music in the 60’s had a telescopic relation, similarly to its culture and fashion. In other words, we witness that genres and styles started to intersect to each other, and one cannot make a clear distinction in what involves pop and rock. I always liked this comparison: Consider that you collect the fashion, subcultures and music and put them all into a blender and mix it until it finds its own color and taste. The year 1966 was maybe a mélange of different musical/cultural attempts and the starting point of a tough six years. The fun could be started.

As I mentioned, musical tastes and styles did highly intersected and it is interesting to witness how preferences and periods jumped into bands choices. Of course, the essential question will remain forever: Was it the listeners and drugs who decided to change, or was it the bands who made an opinion about changing and progressing? Maybe the answer blows in the wind, as Bob Dylan said, but we cannot deny the fact that a subculture completed its circle, with taking its all essential characteristic features and presented against cultures.

I would like to write about the Beach Boys, known as “the innocent” boy band of California surf/pop. In the beginning of the 60’s, the Beach Boys were a musical synonym of the California sound; the surfing, the image of high-school girls who eat ice-cream and roller skating beside the beach and Beat writers who read their poems as loud as possible. In this context, we could easily say that the Beach Boys were including the innocent happiness of pop music, with their clean-cut and grinning faces. Its childish idealism of “walking down the street with my ice-cream in a bright day” was in the same context as the Beatles did in 1962. The sound and its culture were simply about “being happy” and this was enough for its listeners in the years between 1960 and 65’. Their hit single “Surfin’ USA” in 1963 and “Fun Fun Fun” in 64’ were regarded as “innocently happy” in which they used strong beat features.

The Beach Boys / Good Vibrations (1966)

In the same context, let us imagine how the youth would respond: The innocent breeze provided to the youth a gateway, an occasion to have fun freely as possible, quiet contrary and threatening to social taboos in which caused limitations in the long run by the state. And of course, secondly, the rise of the Beatles was changing its shape and image in the mid-sixties: “Music supposed to be presented exaggerative, with a strong language. In this context, rock and pop music could be regarded as to accept the ‘kitsch’ with an ironic idea, to present music theatrical, as if one person would attend to a fancy dress-ball, to revolt against the world in a marginal community and to be seductive as much as possible. Foremost, it should be involved with erotic phantasies.”

Pop and rock music was transforming itself into another sense. The increasing usage of drugs in the States was countless, the youth started to regard pop music as an important channel to reach another stage: The combination of drugs and pop/psychedelic music seemed dangerously beautiful; it started a simple sparkle and broadened up quickly among important bands. The interesting part of the story is that, in the beginning of 1966 (consider as one of the heaviest years in terms of revolting against the war in Vietnam) few bands wrote protest songs (let us accept Bob Dylan as an exception) and it had been observed that bands were starting to sing about imaginary utopian songs, with a high relation of the countless usage of LSD. Maybe this could be a vital point to understand the high relation between pop music and the youth movement. A wide sub-cultural idealism in pop music shaped a sense of having a certain life-style and to regard lyrics as a vital messenger, in order to create a dangerous common sense. As Brett Ingram states: “Common sense tells us that popular music has a role in shaping the worldviews of young people which eclipses that of traditional authority figures. Our subjective conceptions of self-worth, sexual difference, social justice, and artistic merit have a direct effect on how we’ll vote, how we’ll raise our children, what we’ll buy, and what we will fight and perhaps even die for.” We witness certain kind of individuality in pop music; the broad and unlimited “music-channels” provides him to reach at a level in which families, institutions and states begin to fear against a sub-culture. “Moreover, music foregrounds pleasure and the pleasurable experience of one’s body in motion of a dance floor. Perhaps for this reason it has often been attacked by moral monitors who feel that pleasure should be policed and that bodily experience should be restrained because they are connected to sexuality, which of course itself, from a conservative perspective, should be controlled as much as possible.”

For example, lyrics of the band Jefferson Airplane highly referred convincingly to numerous youth cultures, mostly in the States, as a mélange of certain kind of a manifestation that limitations were going to start break away, in terms of using music and drugs as a channel to reach to the ultimate body experience in popular music.

Jefferson Airplane / Somebody To Love / Live (1969)

The song “Somebody To Love” was a big hit all over many countries, its outspoken implication appealed to millions of youths: “When the truth is found to be lies / and all the joy within you dies / don’t you want somebody to love / tears are running down your breast / and your friends baby they threat you like a guest / don’t you want somebody to love” Music’s social function was a threat to the practical function in the everyday life, and we can see that pop music shaped itself and around its listeners as a huge and broad strength. Again, we witness in Ingram’s words that pop music has a leading field in creating a common sense, in which shapes accidentally as a reaction against the majority of the society. “Much of our experience in a disciplined society that assigns proper places to certain activities and forbids them in others is limited and limiting. We unconsciously play by rules of motion and bodily experience that channel and determine what we can or cannot do in certain places. Music challenges those rules by creating pleasure and diffusing it across social boundaries – a tendency made more emphatic by digital music players. A capitalist society especially demands that we work in a disciplined fashion for others for their profit (the motto of the society being “Never have so many worked so hard so that so few could enjoy themselves so much”), but music gives everyone access to a certain degree of pleasure even if they are not on the wealth-magnet end of the social pyramid.”

On the other hand, it would be helpful to notice that the sexual role in artists (especially in female artists) have been used extremely in a seditious way, that is to say, the general side of the ‘disciplined society’ had to deal with a “threat” which would shape a generation’s regard to taboos. Maybe in the 60’s, artists like Grace Slick, Nico from the Velvet Underground and other plenty Go-Go dancers seemed less erotically in comparing today’s pop entertainment, but it can be surely said that live performances and lyrics were quiet enough to be astonishingly surprised. It would be wrong to say that the eroticism in the 60’s female artists were better, it was just loaded with a strong ‘background fashion’ and a better ideology and belief.

So, what changed really in pop music? We are still against a general adult culture that will warn us not to get out of the ‘disciplined society’. The pursuit of getting rid of social taboos and having fun without any constraint in the mid-late 60’s in pop music displaced itself into a vast and creepy eroticism and highly related curiosity of sex.

The best course of action could be made a distinction between the long and hard attempts of the 60’s pop music in order to break the taboos and change a sense of having fun with numerous drugs, and in today’s music sector, in which we face with a faster and pretentious sound, but quiet raucous for those who really wants to have fun through pop music. Style in dress, eating, drinking, talking and expressing is mostly entourage by pop culture and we still don’t have a quiet answer what the next one will affect the further generation. Pop culture, taking its essential mean of the ‘popular’ will provide numerous social understandings in which will bloom and die fastly, against consuming and curious generations.

Here you will be informed about the freaky alternative science facts and researches from all over the World and Outer Space. We will publish our researches in alternative science field to open some of the main mysteries of the Humanity:

Freakscience is a wide sector where we are presenting the researches of the best brains of the Planet to reveal the hidden facts, unknown investigations and unproved theories in many spheres of Normal human science.Today is the time for Sociology.
 
And we give the word to the group of Berkley University sociologist who published recently very interesting report about
THE INFLUENCE OF THE 60’S AND PSYCHEDELIC MUSIC AND CULTURE ON MODERN SOCIETY
 
 
Psychedelic music and the culture of the 1960s and the music of the period had an enormous influence and impact on the way we express ourselves in the modern era. Music has always been both a barometer measuring and responding to society’s problems and possibilities, and the twentieth century was a period that witnessed the emergence of a diverse range of musical styles and genres, each seemingly in reaction to the dominant sociopolitical concerns of the day. Even when the lyrics of songs were not overtly directed towards the description of social conditions and a call to improve them, as was so characteristic of the folk music of the 1960s and 1970s, music was, and always has been, shaped by the conditions of the larger panorama of the socio-cultural moment. The diversity of styles and musical genres that emerged, particularly in the latter half of the century during the turbulent period of the 1960s should hardly come as a surprise, given the variety and intensity of certain social phenomena. There were a number of intense influences that combined to produce this music including increased government control over people’s lives coupled with the fact—perhaps paradoxical—that many people’s lives were getting worse, not better, compelled musicians to respond and integrate matters such as drugs, and they did so in creatively unprecedented ways. This music was thus a response to the dominant concerns of the day and also a reaction that would shape the way people thought and responded to their society. These are only a few reasons why the music of the 1960s is often associated with rebellion and a rebellious period, particularly among the youth population.

The music of the 1960s reflected, as music always does, the zeitgeist of the sociohistorical moment, both articulating and exploring the concerns and interests in larger society. Although critics dismissed the psychedelic music of this period as being too loud, too experimental, and, most worryingly, too tied up with the emerging drugs and the drug culture (Whiteley 33, 62), critic and historian Sheila Whiteley contends that psychedelic music was characterized both by its complexity and its paradoxes (i). While psychedelic music was closely aligned with the drugs and the drug culture—and may, in some ways, be understood as a product of that subculture—it was still, like folk music, a genre of protest, but it was a specific form of protest distinct from the lyrically imperative folk music. As Bindas wrote, “The new psychedelic music registered a protest of form rather than substance. [Psychedelic] music was sexual, highly creative, nonconformist, and clearly in protest of white middle class America” (Bindas 6; emphasis added).

While folk singers like Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, and Peter, Paul, and Mary were strumming their guitars and singing their calls for social justice, systemic change, and freedom for all, typically appealing to love, human reason, and compassionate concern of the listener for his or her fellow human beings both at home and abroad, psychedelic musicians like Jimi Hendrix, The Doors, Pink Floyd, Cream, and Jefferson Airplane were trying to create a similar sense of freedom, but in a totally different way (Whiteley 33). Many of the iconic psychedelic musicians had at least dabbled in drugs and drug culture, if not immersed themselves fully in it, and had, through drugs, achieved a kind of escape, relief, and freedom that did not seem possible in 1960s society, whether here in the United States or in Britain, where psychedelic music also thrived (Bindas 33). There were lots of reasons to escape. For American musicians, in particular, the specter and shame of the Vietnam War hung heavily upon them (Bindas 33). But the “mood song” came to replace the “message song,” as psychedelic musicians sublimated their anxieties and their angst by attempting to just feel better rather than examine how to create systemic change that would make everyone feel better (Bindas 6).

The psychedelic musicians were indisputably affected by the same kinds of concerns that affected their folk music counterparts, but Bindas suggests that musicians and society as a whole had reached its threshold for message music, and wanted to return to the notion of a music that could transport one away from his or her problems rather than situate him or her directly in those problems and require the listener to examine them. Bindas notes several ways in which psychedelic music responded to the sociohistorical moment it occupied. First, he points out, the psychedelic musicians were still infusing their songs with a political flavor—“if anything,” he writes, “[political] fervor had [actually] increased”—but the key distinction of psychedelic music was that “the lyrics were no longer as important, and they could seldom be heard over the music” (Bindas 6). The music itself, meanwhile, was characterized by its instrumental experimentation, distinguished from other forms by “long improvisatory passages and electronically produced sound effects resonated with stroboscopic lighting to bring about a freedom of feeling” (Whiteley 33).

Whether they were entirely conscious of the fact or not, psychedelic musicians and their insistence upon free-flowing, open-ended, electronically distorted “impure” music was a reaction against the increasing “whitewashed conformity of everyday American life” (Fairbanks 14). The Red Scare and Communist witch hunt of the 1950s had left a lingering negative aura over American society, especially for artists and musicians and other producers of cultural creativity. During that period, artists and musicians who had been deemed a threat to the social order were “blacklisted and pushed to the fringes of the mainstream” (Fairbanks 14). Pushed to the periphery, they did not simply cease creative production, however. Instead, they went underground and gave birth to a subculture that would make psychedelic expression in the United States possible.

Psychedelic music, which Johnson and Stax mark as more or less “beginning” in 1967, would ultimately be a reaction against the conformist messages of the media and, above all, the encouragement to adopt supposedly American values (411). It would permit both its musicians and its listeners to enter a parallel universe, one in which control was neither necessary nor welcome. The looping, seemingly undirected music of the psychedelic artists was coupled with lyrics that often focused on insanity, loss of control, and journeys without fixed destinations; in fact, the journeys were trips of the imagination and consciousness, not literal excursions (Johnson & Stax 411). The psychedelic musicians asserted that it was safe to join them in this limitless sphere, and their music thus gained a wide audience, appealing to a segment of the population that had themselves been marginalized and overlooked.

As the music critic Fairbanks thoughtfully observed, “The artists are the critics of culture and the visionaries that open up possibilities for the future” (14), and they are particularly powerful when they come from the underground as was the case with many of the musicians of the 1960s. By reacting to the events of their day and unique historical conditions using musical and lyrical strategies that were non-conformist, the psychedelic artists opened up new musical possibilities, particularly with respect to the traditionally expected and accepted form and function of songs. Their music was shaped by their sociohistorical moment, but it also, ultimately, would shape that moment, too.

Works Cited

Bindas, Kenneth J. America’s Musical Pulse: Popular Music in Twentieth Century Society. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Fairbanks, Philip. “Gonzo Lives Underground.” Afterimage 31.4 (2004): 14.

Johnson, Ann, and Mike Stax. “From Psychotic to Psychedelic: The Garage Contribution to Psychedelia.” Popular Music and Society 29.4 (2006): 411.

Whiteley, Sheila. The Space Between the Notes: Rock and the Counter-Culture. New York: Routledge, 1992.

 

This is a special area of top secret information from the Past, Present and Future of Goa Freaks World.
 
 
GRAPHIC DESIGN HISTORY - SIXTIES’ PSYCHEDELIA.
 
The establishment of psychedelic culture in the World during 60s-70s was obvious tendency after massive immersion of young progressive people of those times with global Hippies movement, Woodstock, Summer of Love, Rock, Indian Spiritualism and LSD.
 
Free minds of the planet- in different cities, countries and continents, were united through the Noosphere of the Earth to give to humanity new creative ideas and design decisions that travelled via neurons of their brains connected in Astral.
 
Otherwise how can we explain the following article:
 
 
 
Friday, 28 February 2014 10:44

Page 6: FreakHero - Cleo Odzer

Cleo Odzer (Sheila Lynne Odzer, 6 April 1950 – 26 March 2001) was an American writer, author of books on prostitution in Thailand, the hippie culture of Goa, and cybersex.
 
She grew up in a wealthy Jewish family in Manhattan, New York City and attended Franklin School (now Dwight School) and Quintano’s School for Young Professionals, graduating from the latter in 1968. At about that time, she began writing about the music scene for a small Greenwich Village newspaper. She met Keith Emerson, then member of the rock band The Nice and later of Emerson, Lake & Palmer, at The Scene nightclub and they were briefly engaged. According to Odzer, Emerson broke off the engagement when he saw a February 1969 Time Magazine article that published her photo and described her as a "Super Groupie." Shortly thereafter in 1969 she recorded an album called The Groupies, produced by Alan Lorber, which essentially consisted of interviews with Cleo and some friends describing their adventures meeting (and sleeping with) rock musicians.
 
Hippie years in Goa
In the early 1970s, Odzer traveled in Europe and the Middle East and worked as a model. She spent the late 1970s in the hippie culture of Anjuna, Goa in India. Her experiences there, including heavy use of cocaine and heroin, the international drug smuggling used to finance the stay, and her subsequent two-week incarceration, would later form the basis of her second book, Goa Freaks: My Hippie Years in India (1995). For a time she followed the teachings of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh in India.
 
Return to U.S.; research in Thailand
After her return to the United States in the late 1970s, Odzer underwent drug treatment at Daytop in New York. She entered college, then graduate school, and in 1990 obtained a Ph.D. in anthropology from The New School for Social Research in New York City with a thesis on prostitution in Thailand. Beginning in 1987, she had spent three years in Thailand to research this topic. In her dissertation, she describes case studies of 17 people connected to the sex industry in Patpong. She concludes that the economic opportunities provided by sex work do not translate into a higher status of women, because of persistent stigma and ideas about gender inequality in Thai society. Her experiences in Thailand were described in her first book, Patpong Sisters: An American Woman's View of the Bangkok Sex World . In this work she describes the Thai prostitutes she got to know as quick-witted entrepreneurs rather than exploited victims, sometimes revered in their poor home villages. She also relates her own problematic affair with a Thai pimp boyfriend.
Following publication of the book, Odzer worked at Daytop in New York, the drug rehabilitation organization she herself had attended earlier.
From 1995 to 1998, Odzer produced several dozen episodes of her show Cleo's Adventures for Manhattan Neighborhood Network Public-access television. Her third book, Virtual Spaces: sex and the cyber citizen (1997), deals with cybersex. She appeared in episode 1.21 of SexTV in 1999, with a segment on cybersex.
 
Return to Goa and death.
Disappointed with life in New York, in 1999 Odzer returned to Goa, where some of the remaining old-time hippies disliked her because of the publicity her book had brought to the scene.She died there in 2001. A good friend of hers who had been corresponding with Odzer during her final stay in India, "Cookie" (with whom she recorded The Groupies), reports that Odzer's doctor (who had been away when she died) said she probably died of a stroke related to very high cholesterol and serious circulatory problems that she was being treated for during her final year, and that her body had been cremated after a small service. But a researcher, Arun Saldanha, who interviewed members of the Goa community about Odzer, reports being told by a psychiatrist at the Goa Medical College some ten months after her death that her body had lain unclaimed in a morgue in Mapusa for more than a month until finally she had been buried in Mapusa without a funeral, and that she had had AIDS.
The 2002 documentary Last Hippie Standing by Marcus Robbin covered the Goa scene and featured some of Cleo Odzer's old super-8 footage from the 1970s. She was interviewed by Robbins for the film in Goa shortly before her death, and said:
“I don't know what the future brings, but I know what I don't want: New York is what I don't want, that culture is what I don't want; it's not right. I don't know what is right. I don't think our old life was right. I don't see a new culture that is right, but we have to continue trying, that's the best we can do, that's the best any of us can do, to keep trying. To make something that is peaceful for everybody, that makes people happy, that is fair to everybody. And that's all I want.”
The film was dedicated to her memory.
 
GOA FREAKS- MY HIPPY LIFE IN INDIA (1976):
In this lively and unique document of 1970s-style hedonism, we follow the futher adventures of Cleo Odzer, whose first book Patpong Sisters was a best seller. Goa Freaks begins in the mid 1970s and tells of Cleo's love affair with Goa, a resort in India where the Freaks (hippies) of the world converge to partake in a heady bohemian lifestyle. To finance their astounding appetites for cocaine, heroin, and hashish, the Freaks spend each monsoon season acting as drug couriers, and soon Cleo is running her own "scams" in Canada, Australis, and the United States. (She even gets her Aunt Sadie in on the action.) Wish her earnings she builds a veritable palace on the beach- the only Goa house with running water and a flushing toilet. Cleo becomes the hostess of Anjuna Beach, holding days-long poker games and movie nights and, as her money begins to run out, transforming the house into a for-profit drug den. Tracing Cleo's love affairs, her stint hiding out at the ashram of the infamous Bhagwan Rajneesh, and her sometimes-harrowing drug experiences, Goa Freaks: My Hippie Years in India is candid and compelling, bringing to life the spirit of a now-lost era.
Saturday, 08 February 2014 15:33

Page 3: Freakstories - The Beatles in India

The legends, myths, mysteries from Hippies till nowadays will be published here to introduce you the history of establishment of World's Psychedelic Culture: 
THE BEATLES AND MEDITATION.

Forty seven years ago, on April 7, 1967 four white young people came down from the plain that delivered them from cold London to hot India. No one of them was known there. But all the rest World watched at them and the inspiration that this journey gave to these visitors became a huge stimulation for thousands of hippies to follow the way of Fantastic Four- come in India, go into meditation and different spiritual practices and love the culture of this great country

THE BEATLES AND MEDITATION.

It would have been easy at the time to dismiss the media frenzy as just another pop culture craze. But reporters knew this was different. Why would four young, bright, fun-loving youngsters, wealthy beyond imagining, able to go anywhere and do anything, choose to hunker down in an austere, vegetarian, non-air-conditioned compound in the Himalayan foothills and spend large chunks of time each day with their eyes closed? What is this meditation thing? What could a backward, impoverished country, only two decades removed from imperial rule, have to offer people who seemed to have everything a human being could want?

In retrospect, the meeting of the Fab Four and the teacher who will probably always be known as "The Beatles' Guru" seems as karmically destined as that of Bill and Hillary or Lewis and Clark. Like many in the counterculture of which they had become de facto leaders, the band members had come to see that psychedelic drugs like LSD could open the door to higher consciousness but they did not let you stay there, and, in the bargain, came with serious risks. The search was on for safe, natural ways to expand the mind and attain inner peace and unified awareness. The East seemed to have answers, and all signs pointed to something called meditation. George Harrison, having spent time in India studying sitar with Ravi Shankar and reading spiritual literature, was among the ripest candidates.

For his part, Maharishi had been circling the globe for nearly a decade, slowly attracting students, mostly among respectable middle-aged people with a metaphysical bent. His laser-like focus on meditation, and his skill in presenting a systematic, universal practice that was suitable for both secular self-improvement and spiritual enlightenment, were ideally suited for the rational, pragmatic West. When, in 1965, college students began to take up TM, word spread quickly and meditation clubs popped up on campuses. By August of 1967, when Maharishi lectured at the London Hilton, it was only natural that Pattie Boyd Harrison would hear about it and lead her husband and his mates to the jam-packed hotel ballroom.

The Beatles took to meditation like they had taken to Chuck Berry and Little Richard. John and George were especially enthusiastic (hear David Frost's interview with them). Young people everywhere, always eager to emulate their musical heroes, flooded TM centers. The press coverage was remarkable for its shortage of cynicism. It featured parents and respected cultural leaders who were impressed by the life changes they observed in the meditating youth. As a result, scientists, prodded by Maharishi, who had majored in physics, started doing rigorous research on the effects of the practice.

Before long, physicians and therapists were recommending meditation to stressed-out grownups. To meet the burgeoning demand, Maharishi trained a cadre of teachers, essentially democratizing what had long been an esoteric practice available only to an elite few, much as Henry Ford had democratized automobiles. Now, hundreds of studies later, meditation and yoga are as mainstream as aerobics and vitamins.

Would this have happened if the Beatles had never gone to India? Maybe, maybe not, but certainly not as quickly. That's not just my assessment. Life magazine at the time dubbed 1968 "The Year of the Guru," and when Newsweek commemorated that seminal year four decades later, one article was titled "What the Beatles Gave Science." The author, Sharon Begley, chose the topic because the lads' trip to India "popularized the notion that the spiritual East has something to teach the rational West.

That's reason enough to remember that eventful journey. If you need another one, go listen to The White Album. Almost all the songs on that double record were written or conceived in the ashram on the Ganges.

THE BEATLES. FIRST TIME IN INDIA

We’d been into drugs, the next step is, you’ve got to try and find a meaning then,” said Paul McCartney in the Beatles ‘Anthology’ documentary. It was George Harrison, already an avid fan and casual student of Eastern ways, who got the ball rolling. He, McCartney and John Lennon went to see a lecture given by the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi in London in the summer of 1967. “That’s where I really went for the meditation,” said Harrison in Anthology. “There’s this thing called a mantra. Through the mantra you can follow a technique that helps you to transcend, that is, to go beyond the waking sleeping dreaming state.”

Following the lecture, the three met Maharishi. “I said to him, got any mantras?” said George. The band were enamoured with the mystic one, and the feeling appeared to be mutual. “They are the ideal of energy and intelligence in the younger generation,” the Maharishi told a reporter after the lecture.

In February 1968, the Beatles took their interest a large step forward by traveling to the Maharishi’s home base in northern India. Lennon and wife Cynthia, and Harrison and Pattie Boyd arrived first (Ringo Starr and Paul would soon join them) along with other notable friends such as Beach Boy Mike Love, Donovan and actress Mia Farrow.

During their stay, they would learn more about meditation and would also find time to write many of the songs that would ultimately end up on ‘The Beatles’ (aka ‘The White Album’). ‘Back In The USSR,’ ‘Dear Prudence’ (written about Farrow’s sister, also in attendance), ‘Mother Nature’s Son,’ and ‘Sexy Sadie’ were just a few of the songs born out of their experiences there.

I was really impressed with the Maharishi. I was impressed because he was laughing all the time,” said Ringo. “It was another point of view. It was the first time we’re sort of getting into Eastern philosophies.” McCartney described the stay in India as “very much like a summer camp,” with Starr adding, “It was pretty far out.”

Both McCartney and Starr cut their stay short, while others hung out for close to two months. The harmonious vibes of the trip, however, would soon come to an end when allegations arose about the more earthly interests of the Maharishi in one or more of the females in attendance as well as questions surrounding the Maharishi seeking financial involvement from the Beatles. Upon their return, a reporter asked Lennon if the Maharishi was “on the level.” Lennon quipped, “I don’t know what level he’s on, but we had a nice holiday in India and came back rested.”

This is a special area of top secret information from the Past, Present and Future of Goa Freaks World.
SPIRAL TRIBE. THE ORIGIN OF FREE ILLEGAL EDM RAVES.
 
 
Everyone loves free parties. We also love them. Early parties in Goa, even few years ago had no charge on the doors. Free Parties, Free People, Free Future was our motto. Time changed and all over the Globe this type of the events almost disappeared.
Not many of you know how and where actually started real free raves, and as a tribute to our old friends , who have been dissolved in time we want to publish today this article.
 
SPIRAL TRIBE. THE ORIGIN OF FREE ILLEGAL EDM RAVES.

On 19 April 1992 - Easter Sunday - Spiral Tribe, a self-described "rag-tag sound system group who came together driven by the will to keep the party going", who had been running free raves with a mobile rig across the UK since 1990, set up in a warehouse in Acton Lane, west London. To a packed house, they partied through the night. In the early hours, police officers from the Metropolitan Police's Territorial Support Group, a specialist division with duties including crowd control, surrounded the building. Those who tried to enter or leave had to face the TSG (the same group responsible for heavy-handed policing of crowds in the recent G20 demonstrations). According to witnesses at Acton Lane, some TSG were masked and had their ID numbers covered. The Spirals and partygoers barricaded the doors, but after a 10-hour stand-off, the police revved up a JCB and broke through the outer wall. Scores of ravers later alleged they were beaten in the dark of the warehouse; witnesses claim one pregnant woman was knocked to the ground. One man who tried to escape over the roof claimed to have been pushed; he fell two storeys breaking both arms and legs. No charges were brought. The next day a police helicopter escorted the Spiral Tribe convoy, 10 vehicles long, out of the London area.

Simone, one of the original Spiral Tribe members, who had fallen into the free party scene years before after working in a PA hire shop in north London, recalls: "Everyone who was there remembers exactly what happened. Being forced down on to muddy floors, being battered. It was a horrible experience.

"They were letting people in and not letting people out, then letting people out and not letting people in," she continues, talking from her current base in a Paris apartment. (Like other Spirals I talked to, she didn't want me to use her full name.) "All of a sudden you peered out of a crack in the wall, and the place was surrounded by every kind of police vehicle you can imagine. They had diggers, they were all in their riot gear, shields. We'd just been dancing for a few days, we're in the middle of an industrial estate, not really affecting anybody else around, and then all of a sudden they started bashing the wall in. They smashed up the decks, just went to town basically. Imagine people who've been up for two or three days dancing; you're a bit tripped out at this point. People were being carted off to hospital."

The Spirals were used to run-ins with the law - "we'd had lines of police directing us across fields" - but nothing like this. "At that point we realised the police were really on our case. There was a news blackout. We tried to call all the journalists we knew, and there was nothing. What happened was kind of obscene, but it went unreported. It felt like we had no way of telling anyone.

"Really, what were we doing that was so disastrously wrong? Occupying empty buildings, playing music and dancing. People of all walks of life were coming together on the dancefloor. They [the police] acted completely out of fear."

Following interim parties at Chobham Common and Stroud Common in Surrey and in the Cotswolds, where they rebuilt some of their equipment, the Spirals elected to seek refuge in numbers. Deciding, as one member recalls, "to take it easy at someone else's party for a change", they headed for the Avon free festival, a regular May bank holiday gathering near Bristol. This year, though, Avon and Somerset Police had other ideas. "They were digging trenches, no one was able to go to the site," says Simone. Police encouraged the sound systems to head towards Castlemorton Common, a few square miles of public land just east of the Malvern Hills. "At Castlemorton we had the biggest space, but our rig was not the loudest," Simone recalls. "After Acton Lane, half of our speakers were blown. But people were always offering us things to make up for lost equipment." Spiral Tribe set up in a semi-circle of trucks, with the centre stage under a huge painted spiral, and joined the party.

It was an event that would never be repeated; a brief triumph for those who wanted to party in the face of vested interests that would soon move in to crush the scene. But for that short window - four days - Castlemorton was a free festival on a new scale. Simone recalls spending some of the time hiding, in awe of the size of the gathering. "It was like, 'Oh shit, what have we done. Things are not going to be the same after this.'" Ten rigs, including Circus Warp, Circus Normal and Bedlam, Adrenaline and Nottingham's DiY sound system set up and declared their own takes on acid house, hardcore, early drum'n'bass and Detroit techno records played at double speed. An estimated 20,000 to 40,000 people gathered, brought together by the music, the freedom and the drugs: travellers, crusties, ravers and new agers - who came with dogs on strings, blue dreadlocks, shaved heads and fire-breathing kits - and just maybe David Cameron, or someone who looked a lot like him (a YouTube clip recently surfaced from Sunrise, an '88 acid house rave, showing a long-haired raver who resembles the leader of the opposition - but Conservative central office deny it is him). There was free enterprise, too, as long as you were shopping for lightsticks, whistles or Rizla.

As the ravers drummed up a party, news hounds drummed up a controversy. David Baldwin, a 37-year-old mechanic whose front garden was 20 yards from the nearest sound system, told the Daily Mail he had seen "youngsters injecting heroin in a Renault 5". Brian Clutterbuck, a smallholder in his 40s, patrolled the edge of his land with a pellet gun. Locals complained about property damage: fence posts, they said, had been ripped up for firewood, and dogs were killing sheep. The local pub and post office shut. In an echo of similar tensions two decades before, locals called the ravers "hippies".

Castlemorton was the lead story on the BBC Six O'Clock News on the Friday and Saturday nights, and the coverage drew people from across the country. (One raver remembers returning home four days later "with eyes like pandas and my mother asked, 'Did you have a good time?'" He told her he'd been at a free party. "'Yes! I know!' she replied. 'I saw you on Central News.'") People in convoys hundreds of cars long hoped those they were following knew where they were heading. Entry routes were blocked not by police but by ravers. Police helicopters flew low over the site to film, and at one point five shipping distress flares were fired at one of them. "This illustrates the lengths to which these people will go to try to prevent police access to the site," West Mercia's assistant chief constable, Philip Davies, said. "Many of them have already displayed an extremely aggressive attitude towards the police, and the safety of my officers must be one of my priorities." There were too many partygoers, in other words, for the police to shut it down.

"These people who live here shouldn't be afraid," one told the Mail. "They should join in." Another, Richard, told the Daily Express: "There is nothing wrong with what we are doing. We are here to have fun in the sun. We chose to live this way and reject the hassles associated with a conventional way of life. Some say we are dirty, but we are environmentally conscious, we make efforts not to dump rubbish. People generally have it in for us because of our lifestyle. I think many envy us because of our freedom."

In a 1970s short story anthology, Three Trips in Time and Space, three leading lights of golden age science fiction wrote of various futures where teleportation was possible. Sandwiched between two eulogies of ease and motion was a delightful dissenting voice: Flash Crowd, by Larry Niven, in which teleportation brings about a terrible anarchy, where millions wander the earth, materialising instantly wherever the latest sensation carries them, leaving destruction in their wake. This was the future that middle England seemingly feared. It was 1992: mobile communications technology had only just begun to reshape our lives (Simone recalls Spiral Tribe had one brick-sized mobile phone, which held a charge for "about three minutes

- we saved the charge and we'd phone up TouchDown radio with the location of the party, which they'd announce at midnight") - yet, it seemed, crowds were already on the move.

"Castlemorton was scarily conspicuous," says Sebastian, another Spiral Tribe member. "You had this sense of, well, what's going to happen next."

Castlemorton didn't just teleport out of nowhere: the rise of the free party scene had been a long time coming. In 1981, Joe Rush, a 21-year-old punk living in Ladbroke Grove, joined the Peace Convoy, a rotating caravan of, he says, "around 40 dodgy and illegal trucks, cars, vans and old ambulances" that roved England from the Windsor and Glastonbury free festivals to smaller parties on common land. In the early days the convoy developed its own tactics to use against the police and local authorities: once, after being refused at a service station, they blocked a three-lane motorway and slow-rolled until police relented and allowed them to refuel. Later, the police response grew brutal, culminating in the Battle of the Beanfield, a police action in June 1985, at the intended 14th Stonehenge free festival. One thousand officers - again with their numbers covered - smashed 140 vehicles and beat the travellers, after which, Joe says, the heart went out of the Peace Convoy.

 

Rush, who later co-founded the Mutoid Waste Company sound system, traces the heritage of the Peace Convoy back to Ken Kesey's Magic Bus Trips and Acid Tours in 60s America, as well as to the tradition of travelling communities in this country, and also links it to political events such as the 1984-85 miners' strike. There were in fact direct connections: in 1989, chief superintendent Ken Tappenden, who had been involved in the miners' strike police action, started the Pay Party Unit, tasked with controlling the rave scene. The unit monitored pirate radio, tapped phones, and organised helicopters to track the organisers. After three months, they had begun 20 major investigations. As Matthew Collin and John Godfrey note in their book Altered State, the Pay Party Unit's database held 5,725 names and details on 712 vehicles. Within weeks, their 200 officers had monitored 4,380 telephone calls and made 258 arrests.

This was around the time Spiral Tribe's Sebastian, aged 17, moved down from west Scotland to London to play in a psychedelic band. A friend invited him to a party. "I thought it was going to be like a Scottish party, with a few friends standing around drinking. We went to Old Street station, where there were loads of police and ravers milling about. A car pulled up and took us to Clink Street." This was a maze of arched vaults on the site of Britain's first prison, near London Bridge, where DJs including the Shamen's Mr C championed the new rave sound. "That was my first rush of acid house," Sebastian says. "After that night, my life was very different." But the Pay Party Unit was working hard, and legislation followed. In 1990, MP Graham Bright introduced the Entertainments (Increased Penalties) Bill, which raised fines for throwing an unlicensed party from £2,000 to £20,000 as well as a possible six months in prison. Nicknamed by Bright "the acid house party bill", it was a clear attempt to push the free-party scene into the licensed leisure industry, so it could be regulated. "It made a difference," recalls Sebastian, speaking to me from Paris after a long weekend of DJing in the French countryside. "The parties changed. Everything had gone into a more clubby direction. I'd been educated by mad illegal raves, and the energy was so different to what I was finding after that. There was a hunger to get back to the acid house rave thing. That was the reason Spiral Tribe came about."

In October 1990 he went to the first Spiral rave, in a squatted schoolhouse in London's Kensal Rise. "I didn't have all the fancy clothes, I didn't have what was necessary to fit in to certain clubs. You walked into Spiral Tribe and none of that mattered. It was like going back to those '88 raves. People were totally friendly; they didn't judge you by what you were wearing. I was hooked."

The Spirals staged their first party in late 1990. By June 1991 they had a mobile rig, and over the next year they travelled England, announcing their integrated ethic on their flyers: "We are here to reconnect the Earth"; "We're part of the earth; we're part of us"; "You might stop the party but you can't stop the future."

This was where people of my age, in their mid- to late-teens at the time, discovered the parties. It's hard to picture those days now, before the internet, when mainstream press had a tighter control over how we saw events like this. Word reached us through friends, or from pirate radios such as TouchDown and Rush FM. At warehouses and squats, UV paint across the walls, we gathered to dance all night to pitch-shifted breakbeats that had yet to be harnessed for TV adverts. The music, impenetrable to many - like me - before their first pill, seemed uniquely British: the harsh beats and melodic breakdowns seemed to dramatise the disjoint in our lives, between life in an impersonal money-focused state, and the new easy honesty we were discovering with each other. The open spirit of those parties seemed like a gateway to a possible future. We told each other things we hadn't said before, and we told them to strangers too. Back then, even the rivalry between sound systems and police had occasional friendly moments. I remember one early morning in mid-1992 walking back through an east London park with the owners of a sound system, lugging a speaker each, as a TSG riot control van followed us. We heard the crackle of their PA system and picked up our pace, fearing arrest. "You should have borrowed our sound system!" they joked through the megaphone, then revved away.

"It was a whirlwind two years, really, but we packed a lot in," says Simone. Spiral Tribe's living arrangements were typical of the dozens of sound systems across the UK. "We were all pretty much squatting. Not everyone. Once we hit the road, we used to sleep in the truck, under the truck, take turns in sleeping. It wasn't that important really. The first parties in London were fivers in. That gave us enough money to pay the DJs a bit, print flyers for the next party and a bit of diesel for the generator. We ate vegetable curries a lot. We didn't need much, really."

Most of the sound systems worked to ensure they left little damage after their parties. "We always wanted to leave as little trace as possible," another Spiral member recalls. "After Castlemorton, we hung out until Wednesday, Thursday, clearing up, leaving the site impeccably clean. Then, as we pulled off site, the police asked us, 'Have you been at Castlemorton?' Everyone said: 'Yes,' and that was it. Everyone was nicked. Everything was impounded. They really went to town."

Simone had left for London the day before. That day there was a knock at the door, and she was arrested. "They took every scrap of paper off the wall. We had a mini-office, where we did photocopying and everything, and they took it all."

In all, 13 Spiral members were charged with public order offences. Their trial became one of the longest and most expensive cases in British legal history at the time, lasting four months and costing the taxpayer £4m. The police used any tactic they could to support their case. "We even all had our handwriting analysed," says Simone. "We had a messy office full of stuff, and they were trying to ascertain who'd written some philosophical rant. It was incredible. Actually, in the end it turned around in our favour. There was no conspiracy to bring down the government, which I think they were looking for. In the end everything was thrown back in their face, and the jury saw that. It was painful, laborious - luckily, there was a good team of lawyers, everyone had to go in every day and have their chance on the stand. Everyone was just as honest as they could be. There was nothing to hide." All 13 were acquitted. According to one witness, a superintendent approached a group of Spiral members on the steps outside the court and said: "I just want you to know that I don't agree with what is happening to you here. This is a political stitch-up."

After Castlemorton, police pressure on free parties did not relent. Some ravers believe there was an explicit agenda to extend legal licensing hours while cracking down on free parties. In that sense, superclubs such as Cream and Ministry of Sound have their direct roots in the repression of the roving sound systems. And the police tactics worked. "One weekend after Castlemorton we tried to put on a party," says Sebastian. "We had five back-up venues, and every time we arrived at the next one, the police had already closed it down. It was really difficult to put things on under the name Spiral Tribe, so it was either disband the name, or take it out to Europe. Half of the crew went to Europe, and half stayed in London."

"Where could we go?" says Simone. "They'd taken every last coin out of our pocket, impounded all our equipment - we weren't getting that back. We went to France, and it took on a new form."

There were already UK sound systems spreading across the continent. Mutoid Waste moved to Berlin, where they were when the Wall came down. With Bedlam, another sound system, they held a party by the Brandenburg Gate. Joe and the other Mutoids built a Stonehenge out of scrapped East German tanks they found in an abandoned base. After the party, and without permission, they hoisted two decommissioned MiG fighter jets on to trucks and headed further east.

"There were travellers, ravers, intellectuals," recalls Joe. "It was a crazy, mixed crowd."

"The country that really connected was France," says Sebastian. "Spiral Tribe went to Berlin, and they didn't want to know. They didn't have any need for the free party scene. Because you can go to a club all night, and the drinks aren't expensive, and the security don't get in your way."

Back in the UK, it took a few years for the law to catch up with the state's intentions to wreck the party. But when it did, it arrived with the infamous Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994, section 63 (1)(b), which outlawed outdoor parties. In an unusual foray by civil servants into music criticism, the wording of the act defined "music" as that which "includes sounds wholly or predominantly characterised by the emission of a succession of repetitive beats". Following the act, if there were more than 10 of you and you looked like you were waiting for a party, even if the land wasn't privately owned, you could be told to leave, and if you did not, or if you returned, you faced up to three months in prison.

Sound systems such as Spiral and Bedlam realised they could not return to the UK. They began a slow migration across Europe, sowing the seeds of rave culture, starting parties that evolved into big-name modern festivals.

In the course of the decade, the music itself took on a more central focus. In 1990, Sebastian (who still records techno under the name 69db) had commuted from a Leeds music course to London every weekend to attend Spiral Tribe parties. During the week he found himself drifting downstairs at the college to the recording studio, and making electronic music which he brought to London at the weekends. He suggested a Spiral label, and found himself handling the music and recording side of Spiral Tribe. The group had previously issued white labels, sold through friends, but through a connection with Youth from the band Killing Joke they landed a deal with Butterfly Records and a £40,000 advance for an album. "We built a recording studio into the back of a showman's trailer, and we pulled it around Europe," says Sebastian.

The French techno scene has moved towards live-performance techno. "Some live sets have gone up to 22 hours of live playing," says Sebastian. "We're mostly based in France now." These events in the French countryside attract up to 50,000 people. There the Tribe members remain, continuing to promote the cause of gathering under the banner of music, outside the commercialised system of pop. "Britain is very good at presenting music in certain ways," says Sebastian. "Ever since the Beatles, we discovered it made money. But music's a much bigger thing. It can really bring people together."

"Spiral Tribe could not now organise a festival in the UK," says Simone, referring to the likelihood that the police would find out and shut it down before it happened. According to Joe Rush, communications technology has paradoxically made it harder to arrange events outside the system. Police monitor websites, and, according to Joe, track phones. "In the old days, the police had some advantages - they had radios and we didn't. Now everyone has mobile phones. But it works both ways: it's much easier for police to track people."

Some sound systems have found a new kind of compromise. In 2001, Mutoid Waste returned to the UK. Joe Rush and co have parlayed their showmanship, honed across Europe, into events held under the name Trash City, whose giant installation shows, featuring robots, drag queens and cancan girls, are a regular feature at Glastonbury. Rush's income now comes from these events, as well as sales of his sculptures. They've come to a more reasonable understanding with the authorities. "In the Thatcher years, the battle lines were drawn," says Rush - an older punk now, with a weathered face and a worn leather jacket - in his warehouse studio in London's Old Street. "You were either one of us or one of them. It's more relaxed now. We've agreed: we have security, crowd control, health and safety ... We toughened up. We grew up. It used to be we felt everyone should be like us, but we realised we were part of society, not an alternative society." He's not alone: Bedlam have capitalised upon their expertise with easily installable sound systems into Noise Control, a successful sound system speaker business.

Nonetheless, in Britain, legislation continues to eat into our freedom to gather and party. New security regulations for live performances include a long list of prohibitive restrictions, including the need for police checks on performers. It's hard to see what motivates such control on the part of the state, except for fear. What is it about young people gathering together that provokes such a severe, sometimes brutal, response? Villages can have fetes, children can have fairs, but something about so much youth in one place scares someone. As Simone told me, "What was it that was so bad about what we were doing? We didn't leave much damage. Castlemorton is still as beautiful as it ever was."

In the tension between travelling sound systems and local landowners, it's tempting to draw grand conclusions about a schism in our nature. Joe Rush does: he sees the conflict between free parties and the state as "an age-old tension between itinerants and homesteaders". It's also tempting to romanticise the itinerant life. Who hasn't dreamed, if only in adolescence, of throwing aside commitments and living the life of the road with a surrogate family? Of course, dreams are what you wake up from, and life on the road is not all parties. Everyone I spoke to had faced problems on the road: violence, excessive drug use. Rush admits that ketamine and heroin interfered with the extrovert optimism that ecstasy had encouraged. He has a theory that the arc of a movement echoes the arc of that movement's drug of choice. "Punk was speed, an angry, dizzy rush. With ecstasy, there's a euphoric rush, then you're monged out and down. That was how things were." But the highs outweighed the lows. "The party is the best form of interaction there is," says Rush. Mutoid's solution to their troubles was to remain in motion. "We met people who were inspiring, and people who weren't," he adds. "The uninspiring people couldn't keep up." Like most of those I spoke with, Rush is still in motion. "I go wherever the work is: the UK, Japan... I live in the corner of my studio, or a friend's flat, or the back of a truck." Spiral's Simone chose the life aged 17, and she hasn't looked back. "At the time you don't really think about it. It wasn't a conscious thing. It just unfolded. I gave myself to it, which was mad, perhaps, but it's definitely been worthwhile. We put our whole selves into it."

In March, Mutoid Waste were part of Space Ritual '09, a regulated event - they appeared inside the revamped Roundhouse in Camden Town, as invited guests. Back in the winter of 1991-92, over Christmas and new year, Spiral Tribe squatted that same building. "The Roundhouse was a big shift, coming back into London and occupying such a prominent landmark," remembers Simone. She reckons 10,000 people passed through the doors. There were power cuts and door troubles, but for over a week the party went on. On that New Year's Eve, I took my first pill - a white cap and then a red and black - and, along with a group of friends, saw in 1992 from the roof of the Roundhouse. It felt like something new to all of us; a breeze from outside our regular lives. Afterwards, I went home and told my cat over and over again that I loved him.

My own circle of friends fell into the orbit of the free party movement, and we loved it, then we moved on. Seduced by secure homes and shiny cars, we made our choice. Most of us, driven by some blend of risk-avoidance and ambition, chose to remain in this world of salaries and rent payments, a life drifting in and out of our vast field of office farms. We plumped for a more widely accepted definition of freedom: we picked freedom of acquisition over fr

eedom of movement. The world we saw from the roof of the Roundhouse was a world we loved, but not enough. You choose and you lose. But we should remember to be grateful for those who choose otherwise - especially now, when we have a drought of alternatives at the very moment we might need them.

Sebastian sees the power of free parties to foster a collective feeling as almost religiously transformative. "Day-to-day life is difficult for people," he says. "Going to work every day is all right for the few who have the job they wanted, but most people don't. And that means they're paying their taxes and paying their rent. One of the things that was good about the free party scene at the time was that you'd go out and get this incredibly good feeling from people. It's the incredible power music has."

 

Saturday, 18 January 2014 04:21

Page 3: Freakstories - Goa Hippies

The legends, myths, mysteries from Hippies till nowadays will be published here to introduce you the history of establishment of World's Psychedelic Culture
 
 
Goa Hippies then and now...
Goa became famous as a hippie destination in the 1960s. Most hippies around the world went on to different things, like raising families or joining politics or playing the stock market. But in Goa, the hippie phenomenon is frozen in time ñ with many hippies still here living much the same lifestyle as they did 40 years ago.

One of Goaís most well-known hippies is a man known as Loka Devadas. Now 64, heís been coming to Goa since 1967. Born Bjorn Skalen, he worked as a teacher in his native Sweden for many years. His wanderlust began at the age of 19, when he hitchhiked to Kathmandu to meet Hindu sadhus and Buddhist monks. Devadas says his spiritual quest culminated in the 70s when he met Osho Rajneesh, the famous Indian guru whose criticism of organized religion and support of more open attitudes towards sexuality made him a controversial figure. Today, Devadas runs a website, http://friakademi.se/, to share talks, music, sound art, digital sculptures and videos through which he aims to inspire meditation, humour and awareness.

The Woodstock festival celebrated in New York in 1969 became an important symbol of hippie culture, of the free-thinking people who epitomised love, peace and music. These ëflower powerí people adorned themselves with blossoms, swam in the lake, danced with the wind, cooked and shared food in open fields,  often got high on marijuana, and made lots of music. It was around this time that writers like Allen Ginsberg, Ken Casey, Neal Cassady and Jack Kerouac gave birth to the ìBeatnikî genre of un-repressed written expression, while Bob Dylan and Bob Marley immortalised the philosophy of love and peace with their songs. Perhaps for the first time since Gandhi, peace again made headlines because of the Woodstock hippies.
Many hippies from all over the world were attracted to India around this time. Some drifted to newly found spiritual centres in Pondicherry or Pune; others immersed themselves in a spiritual movement called Iskcon (International Society for Krishna Consciousness) and some also refused to associate with any spiritual tag. Many returned to their countries and went on to raise families, settled in routine jobs, or even began making big money on the Wall Street.

In Goa, the first small group of these happy-go-lucky people found their haven in Anjuna, in the sixties, a sleepy village with few residents. People with names like Eight-finger Eddie, Junky Robert, Hollywood Peter and Trumpet Steve immortalised Goaís hippie identity. Slowly, the word spread and more and more foreigners came flocking. The Anjuna flea market began swarming with barter and business. The local economy blossomed.

Wolfram, who first came to Goa in 1967, remembers those days: ìAll the doors used to be open. No one locked their homes. When I returned to Goa in 1974, there were all these big, big locks! And it was so cheap, 80 paisa for a pig thali, one rupee if you eat at a big hotel.î

Wolfram is fondly called ìMuji,î short for Bangladeshís first president Mujibur Rahman, by his friends in Anjuna and Arambol. The 69-year-old Austrian comes to Goa for six months every year when the Austrian winters become too cold for comfort. The German Bakery in Anjuna is his favourite joint, as it is with many hippies who adopt Goa as their second home for several months every year. Pankaj Kohli, owner of the bakery, laughs when asked to point out some regulars: ìHow can I point out a hippie for you? Itís not about dressing or smoking. Itís all in the mind!î

Indeed, the ìhippieî tag immediately creates an image of a rebel, a bohemian outcast who refuses to look and behave as expected by society. In Goa, many live life on their own terms by following creative pursuits, all the while spreading the mantra of world peace and love.

True, times have changed. But John Paris, who stays in Goa half of each year, is happy with the new generation heís seeing today.

People always ask me if I am disappointed with the crowds of young people flocking to Arambol. I tell them this: ëWhen I came to Goa in 1965, there were just 50 of us doing yoga, singing and dancing by the lake. Now, there are 50,000 of us, most of them young blood.í That is nothing but good!í It proves that we are still a people that believe in love, in caring.î

Just as he refuses to buy flowers, John refuses to use the cell phone and shuns electronic devices. Most of his friends also live a frugal, yet full-throttle fun lifestyle. They may be frozen in time, but the hippies in Goa continue to make noise for peace.
This is a special area of top secret information from the Past, Present and Future of Goa Freaks World.
 
 
The rise of EDM music in Goa
During the Seventies, the musical repertoire of the first Goa DJs was mostly made of the mind-blowing rock music of the time : Led Zeppelin, the Who - both groups came to Goa - the Grateful Dead, the Doors, Neil Young, the Eagle, Pink Floyd, but also some Bob Marley, Parliament...

In 1979, one or two songs by Kraftwerk could already be heard during the parties. But it is in 1983 that two French DJs, Laurent and Fred Disko, soon followed by Goa Gil, organizer of the "Full Moon Parties" alternating live groups and DJs, grew tired of the "rock/fusion/reggae" tunes they used to spin and began to play the electrobeat music coming from Europe : Cabaret Voltaire, Nitzer Ebb, Front 242, Frontline Assembly, the Residents, New Order, Blanc MangeÖ
It is worth noticing that a similar phenomenon was taking place in the United States, particularly in Detroit, on WGPR radio thanks to Charles Johnson, also known as Electrifying Mojo, or in Chicago, in the Warehouse club with DJ Frankie Knuckles. The seeds of Goa Trance, Techno and House were planted at the same time.

Back to Goa.
These new sounds were first mildly appreciated by the Hippies. The tunes played by Fred Disko were too strange for them. Laurent took everything under control, and thanks to his less eccentric style, acidheads began to prefer these futuristic sounds to the wah-wah of Jimi Hendrix. On top of that, it was easier to dance with that kind of music.

The Goa mixes
From then on, the gathering and exchange of the weirdest and most mind-blowing music from all over the world, called "special music", became the official sport of the Goa Hippie community. The remix of the tracks was a necessary task, since most of them included pointless lyrics and were way too short. The DJs used walkmans to record the useful parts of the tunes, and then proceeded to all sorts of manipulations before delivering 100% Goa-style mixes to the dancing crowd.
And then, as early as 1985, all the music played in Goa had become electronic. Some well-known groups could be identified, like Frankie Goes to Hollywood, Dead or Alive, Portion ControlÖ Yet, most of the time, the tracks came from 12" B-sides or dub mixes, which were very hard to get. As an illustration, here is a short anecdote about Sven V‰th, the German Pope of Trance, when he first visited Goa : "One of the first Goa DJs, Laurent, came up and said how much they liked my early, 16-bit recordings. Hardly anybody knows those records !"
 


The Full Moon Parties : an initiation
Until the mid-90's, the Hippie vibe, which had remained strong on the Goa beaches for 30 years, had a huge influence on the travellers :


Tsuyoshi Suzuki [Prana] : " My life changed. I dropped out of the society completely. In Japan, you have to belong to the company. This is how our parents educated us. So, I graduated from University, then I worked. After Goa, I just quit. "

Mark Allen [Quirk] : " I realised working to earn lots of money was not what I wanted to do with my life. My optimistic vision is that it's not so much dropping out as realising that you don't have to do a nine-to-five. It's actually trough coming together and celebrating life together that it inspires other people to go off, travel, get creative. So many people are just in a job, frustrated, dreaming."

James Munro [Technossomy] : " It opened me up to religion. Seeing how you can be happy without materialism. The ambitions I had when I was little, of earning shit loads of money, just went."

As Goa Gil always says, the Goa spirit is more than "a disco under the coconut trees". Actually, the DJ is looked upon as a modern shaman, turning his desk into an altar (with Hindu symbols for instance), and leading his congregation to a spiritual journey through the night, rewriting the history of humankind : soft and slow tracks at the beginning, getting more and more repetitive and harder. The climax is reached at dawn, and then happier and more melodic tunes are played, so as to welcome the sunrise. Symbolically, this evolution of the musical set represents the destruction of the ego, before the created void is filled with light.

Contrary to other forms of EDM, the mix quality is not that important : on the one hand, the journey that is told through the set needs breaks, and on the other hand beatmatching would prove almost impossible with the historical use of cassettes and DAT during the parties (vinyls would melt or get dirty with dust).

A typical party
The party season is from November to April. Two renowned places are Bamboo Forest on Anjuna Beach and Disco Valley on Vagator. Legally speaking, playing amplified music after 10pm is forbidden : thus, every party is technically breaking the law. Until 1990, a little baksheesh - the money came from the bars receipts or directly from the pockets of the Trancers - or a few beers would keep the police away.

To find a party, you have to rely on the rumours you heard during the day, or ask the taxi drivers. At dusk, people go the their favourite bar on the beach (e.g. Shore Bar on South Anjuna or Nine Bar on Vagator Beach). There, you drink a beer and smoke your first joint. Around 9pm, it's dinner time. At midnight, the music begins to be played loud. You can follow the Vespa line, driving through the night, guided by the throbbing beats.
Here you are. All around the dance floor, in front of which stands the shaman-DJ under his tent, you have the chill-out zone, with its kerosene lamps and its mats placed by local women, selling tea, sandwiches, fruits, cigarettes. This is also the place where you will meet the dealers.
Between 3am and 5am, the party reaches its peak. The music generally stops around noon, but huge parties can go on for several days.
 
 
Saturday, 11 January 2014 15:34

Page 5: Freaksfiles - The Bicycle Day

This is a special area of top secret information from the Past, Present and Future of Goa Freaks World.

Hallucinogens - the Bicycle Day

The "Bicycle Day": the day of LSD Discovery


April 19, 1943, Hofmann performed a self-experiment to determine the true effects of LSD, intentionally ingesting 0.25 milligrams (250 micrograms) of the substance, an amount he predicted to be a threshold dose (an actual threshold dose is 20 micrograms). Less than an hour later, Hofmann experienced sudden and intense changes in perception. He asked his laboratory assistant to escort him home and, as use of motor vehicles was prohibited because of wartime restrictions, they had to make the journey on a bicycle. On the way, Hofmann’s condition rapidly deteriorated as he struggled with feelings of anxiety, alternating in his beliefs that the next-door neighbor was a malevolent witch, that he was going insane, and that the LSD had poisoned him. When the house doctor arrived, however, he could detect no physical abnormalities, save for a pair of incredibly dilated pupils. Hofmann was reassured, and soon his terror began to give way to a sense of good fortune and enjoyment, as he later wrote...


    "... little by little I could begin to enjoy the unprecedented colors and plays of shapes that persisted behind my closed eyes. Kaleidoscopic, fantastic images surged in on me, alternating, variegated, opening and then closing themselves in circles and spirals, exploding in colored fountains, rearranging and hybridizing themselves in constant flux ..."

The events of the first LSD trip, now known as “Bicycle Day”, after the bicycle ride home, proved to Hofmann that he had indeed made a significant discovery: a psychoactive substance with extraordinary potency, capable of causing significant shifts of consciousness in incredibly low doses. Hofmann foresaw the drug as a powerful psychiatric tool; because of its intense and introspective nature, he couldn’t imagine anyone using it recreationally. Bicycle day is increasingly observed in psychedelic communities as a day to celebrate the discovery of LSD.

The celebration of Bicycle Day originated in DeKalb, IL., in 1985, when Thomas B. Roberts, then a Professor at Northern Illinois University, invented the name "Bicycle Day" founded the first Bicycle Day celebration at his home. Several years later, he sent an announcement made by one of his students to friends and Internet lists, thus propagating the idea and the celebration. His original intent was to commemorate Hofmann's original, accidental exposure on April 16, but that date fell midweek and was not a good time for the party, so he chose the 19th to honor Hofmann's first intentional exposure.

Discovery of the Psychic Effects of LSD

The solution of the ergotoxine problem had led to fruitful results, described here only briefly, and had opened up further avenues of research. And yet I could not forget the relatively uninteresting LSD-25. A peculiar presentiment—the feeling that this substance could possess properties other than those established in the first investigations—induced me, five years after the first synthesis, to produce LSD-25 once again so that a sample could be given to the pharmacological department for further tests. This was quite unusual; experimental substances, as a rule, were definitely stricken from the research program if once found to be lacking in pharmacological interest.
    Nevertheless, in the spring of 1943, I repeated the synthesis of LSD-25. As in the first synthesis, this involved the production of only a few centigrams of the compound.
    In the final step of the synthesis, during the purification and crystallization of lysergic acid diethylamide in the form of a tartrate (tartaric acid salt), I was interrupted in my work by unusual sensations.

The following description of this incident comes from the report that I sent at the time to Professor Stoll:

    Last Friday, April 16,1943, I was forced to interrupt my work in the laboratory in the middle of the afternoon and proceed home, being affected by a remarkable restlessness, combined with a slight dizziness. At home I lay down and sank into a not unpleasant intoxicated-like condition, characterized by an extremely stimulated imagination. In a dreamlike state, with eyes closed (I found the daylight to be unpleasantly glaring), I perceived an uninterrupted stream of fantastic pictures, extraordinary shapes with intense, kaleidoscopic play of colors. After some two hours this condition faded away.



    This was, altogether, a remarkable experience—both in its sudden onset and its extraordinary course. It seemed to have resulted from some external toxic influence; I surmised a connection with the substance I had been working with at the time, lysergic acid diethylamide tartrate. But this led to another question: how had I managed to absorb this material? Because of the known toxicity of ergot substances, I always maintained meticulously neat work habits. Possibly a bit of the LSD solution had contacted my fingertips during crystallization, and a trace of the substance was absorbed through the skin. If LSD-25 had indeed been the cause of this bizarre experience, then it must be a substance of extraordinary potency. There seemed to be only one way of getting to the bottom of this. I decided on a self-experiment.
    Exercising extreme caution, I began the planned series of experiments with the smallest quantity that could be expected to produce some effect, considering the activity of the ergot alkaloids known at the time: namely, 0.25 mg (mg = milligram = one thousandth of a gram) of lysergic acid diethylamide tartrate. Quoted below is the entry for this experiment in my laboratory journal of April 19, 1943.


Self-Experiments

 4/19/43 16:20: 0.5 cc of 1/2 promil aqueous solution of diethylamide tartrate orally = 0.25 mg tartrate. Taken diluted with about 10 cc water. Tasteless.
    17:00: Beginning dizziness, feeling of anxiety, visual distortions, symptoms of paralysis, desire to laugh.
    Supplement of 4/21: Home by bicycle. From 18:00- ca.20:00 most severe crisis. (See special report.)


  
  Here the notes in my laboratory journal cease. I was able to write the last words only with great effort. By now it was already clear to me that LSD had been the cause of the remarkable experience of the previous Friday, for the altered perceptions were of the same type as before, only much more intense. I had to struggle to speak intelligibly. I asked my laboratory assistant, who was informed of the self-experiment, to escort me home. We went by bicycle, no automobile being available because of wartime restrictions on their use. On the way home, my condition began to assume threatening forms. Everything in my field of vision wavered and was distorted as if seen in a curved mirror. I also had the sensation of being unable to move from the spot. Nevertheless, my assistant later told me that we had traveled very rapidly. Finally, we arrived at home safe and sound, and I was just barely capable of asking my companion to summon our family doctor and request milk from the neighbors.
  
  In spite of my delirious, bewildered condition, I had brief periods of clear and effective thinking—and chose milk as a nonspecific antidote for poisoning.
    The dizziness and sensation of fainting became so strong at times that I could no longer hold myself erect, and had to lie down on a sofa. My surroundings had now transformed themselves in more terrifying ways. Everything in the room spun around, and the familiar
objects and pieces of furniture assumed grotesque, threatening forms. They were in continuous motion, animated, as if driven by an inner restlessness. The lady next door, whom I scarcely recognized, brought me milk—in the course of the evening I drank more than two liters. She was no longer Mrs. R., but rather a malevolent, insidious witch with a colored mask.
   
Even worse than these demonic transformations of the outer world, were the alterations that I perceived in myself, in my inner being. Every exertion of my will, every attempt to put an end to the disintegration of the outer world and the dissolution of my ego, seemed to be wasted effort. A demon had invaded me, had taken possession of my body, mind, and soul. I jumped up and screamed, trying to free myself from him, but then sank down again and lay helpless on the sofa. The substance, with which I had wanted to experiment, had vanquished me. It was the demon that scornfully triumphed over my will. I was seized by the dreadful fear of going insane. I was taken to another world, another place, another time. My body seemed to be without sensation, lifeless, strange. Was I dying? Was this the transition? At times I believed myself to be outside my body, and then perceived clearly, as an outside observer, the complete tragedy of my situation. I had not even taken leave of my family (my wife, with our three children had traveled that day to visit her parents, in Lucerne). Would they ever understand that I had not experimented thoughtlessly, irresponsibly, but rather with the utmost caution, an-d that such a result was in no way foreseeable? My fear and despair intensified, not only because a young family should lose its father, but also because I dreaded leaving my chemical research work, which meant so much to me, unfinished in the midst of fruitful, promising development. Another reflection took shape, an idea full of bitter irony: if I was now forced to leave this world prematurely, it was because of this Iysergic acid diethylamide that I myself had brought forth into the world.
 
  By the time the doctor arrived, the climax of my despondent condition had already passed. My laboratory assistant informed him about my self-experiment, as I myself was not yet able to formulate a coherent sentence. He shook his head in perplexity, after my attempts to describe the mortal danger that threatened my body. He could detect no abnormal symptoms other than extremely dilated pupils. Pulse, blood pressure, breathing were all normal. He saw no reason to prescribe any medication. Instead he conveyed me to my bed and stood watch over me. Slowly I came back from a weird, unfamiliar world to reassuring everyday reality. The horror softened and gave way to a feeling of good fortune and gratitude, the more normal perceptions and thoughts returned, and I became more confident that the danger of insanity was conclusively past.
    Now, little by little I could begin to enjoy the unprecedented colors and plays of shapes that persisted behind my closed eyes. Kaleidoscopic, fantastic images surged in on me, alternating, variegated, opening and then closing themselves in circles and spirals, exploding in colored fountains, rearranging and hybridizing themselves in constant flux. It was particularly remarkable how every acoustic perception, such as the sound of a door handle or a passing automobile, became transformed into optical perceptions. Every sound generated a vividly changing image, with its own consistent form and color.
   
Late in the evening my wife returned from Lucerne. Someone had informed her by telephone that I was suffering a mysterious breakdown. She had returned home at once, leaving the children behind with her parents. By now, I had recovered myself sufficiently to tell her what had happened.
    Exhausted, I then slept, to awake next morning refreshed, with a clear head, though still somewhat tired physically. A sensation of well-being and renewed life flowed through me. Breakfast tasted delicious and gave me extraordinary pleasure. When I later walked out into the garden, in which the sun shone now after a spring rain, everything glistened and sparkled in a fresh light. The world was as if newly created. All my senses vibrated in a condition of highest sensitivity, which persisted for the entire day.


    This self-experiment showed that LSD-25 behaved as a psychoactive substance with extraordinary properties and potency. There was to my knowledge no other known substance that evoked such profound psychic effects in such extremely low doses, that caused such dramatic changes in human consciousness and our experience of the inner and outer world.
    What seemed even more significant was that I could remember the experience of LSD inebriation in every detail. This could only mean that the conscious recording function was not interrupted, even in the climax of the LSD experience, despite the profound breakdown of the normal world view. For the entire duration of the experiment, I had even been aware of participating in an experiment, but despite this recognition of my condition, I could not, with every exertion of my will, shake off the LSD world. Everything was experienced as completely real, as alarming reality; alarming, because the picture of the other, familiar everyday reality was still fully preserved in the memory for comparison.
    Another surprising aspect of LSD was its ability to produce such a far-reaching, powerful state of inebriation without leaving a hangover. Quite the contrary, on the day after the LSD experiment I felt myself to be, as already described, in excellent physical and mental condition.


    I was aware that LSD, a new active compound with such properties, would have to be of use in pharmacology, in neurology, and especially in psychiatry, and that it would attract the interest of concerned specialists. But at that time I had no inkling that the new substance would also come to be used beyond medical science, as an inebriant in the drug scene. Since my self-experiment had revealed LSD in its terrifying, demonic aspect, the last thing I could have expected was that this substance could ever find application as anything approaching a pleasure drug. I failed, moreover, to recognize the meaningful connection between LSD inebriation and spontaneous visionary experience until much later, after further experiments, which were carried out with far lower doses and under different conditions.
    The next day I wrote to Professor Stoll the above-mentioned report about my extraordinary experience with LSD-25 and sent a copy to the director of the pharmacological department, Professor Rothlin.
    As expected, the first reaction was incredulous astonishment. Instantly a telephone call came from the management; Professor Stoll asked: "Are you certain you made no mistake in the weighing? Is the stated dose really correct?" Professor Rothlin also called, asking the same question. I was certain of this point, for I had executed the weighing and dosage with my own hands. Yet their doubts were justified to some extent, for until then no known substance had displayed even the slightest psychic effect in fraction-of-a-milligram doses. An active compound of such potency seemed almost unbelievable.
    Professor Rothlin himself and two of his colleagues were the first to repeat my experiment, with only one-third of the dose I had utilized. But even at that level, the effects were still extremely impressive, and quite fantastic. All doubts about the statements in my report were eliminated.

 

 

The Psychedelic in Society: A Brief Cultural History of Tripping

The term  psychedelic  is derived from the  Ancient Greek  words  psuchē  (ψυχή - psyche, "soul") and  dēlōsē  (δήλωση - "manifest"), translating to "soul-manifesting".

A  psychedelic experience  is characterized by the striking perception of aspects of one's mind previously unknown, or by the creative exuberance of the mind liberated from its ostensibly ordinary fetters. Psychedelic states are an array of experiences including changes of  perception  such as  hallucinations,  synesthesia, altered states of awareness or focused consciousness, variation in thought patterns,  trance  or  hypnotic  states,  mystical  states, and other mind alterations.
 
These processes can lead some people to experience changes in mental operation defining their self identity (whether in momentary acuity or chronic development) different enough from their previous normal state that it can excite feelings of newly formed understanding ranging from  revelation  &  enlightenment  to the opposing polarity of  confusion  &  psychosis. Psychedelic states may be elicited by various techniques, such as meditation, sensory stimulation[1]  or  deprivation, and most commonly by the use of  psychedelic substances. When these psychoactive  substances are used for  religious,  shamanic, or  spiritual  purposes, they are termed  entheogens.
The term was first coined as a noun in 1957 by  psychiatrist  Humphry Osmond  as an alternative descriptor for  hallucinogenic drugs  in the context of  psychedelic psychotherapy
Psychedelics are notorious today because of the rude splash they made in the Sixties and Seventies, when the tidal wave of altered consciousness they unleashed billowed across the social landscape, upsetting many an apple cart, Newtonian and otherwise, along the way. During the course of this insurrectional drive to expand the human mind, millions of students, artists, and other seekers were ushered by chemical agents toward – and, hopefully, through -- the Doors of Perception, a term borrowed from William Blake by Aldous Huxley to describe, in his 1954 book of the same title, the expansive universe to which drugs such as LSD can open up the mortal brain -- a realm in which everything appears, in Blake's words, "as it is, infinite."
 
Timothy Leary’s calls to “tune in” psychedelically and Ken Kesey’s Electric Kool-Aid Acid Tests, the multimedia LSD extravaganzas immortalized by Tom Wolfe, steered untold legions through these portals into a molten state of being which is all but smothered today beneath the buttoned-down collars of straight-laced yuppie composure. Because most psychedelic drugs have been illegal since 1966, there are no accurate polls to determine the numbers of people who experimented. But many at least temporarily heeded Leary's clarion call to abandon middle-class security and catch the wave of revelation by gulping down psychotropic chemicals. Leary's death in 1996 has sparked a burst of introspection on the impact of the drugs he proselytized, and the high numbers of Baby Boomers who stormed heaven with them now have the stature to contemplate the fruits of their rebellions.
 
The demographics of tripping are actually much broader than one might suspect. You needn't be a hippie to have a psychedelic background. The corporate and civic leaders who are running the country today are likely to have once been experimental long-hairs in their school days.
 
We know that President Bill Clinton and both major-paty candidates vying to succeed him, Texas governor George W. Bush and Vice-President Al Gore, have admitted or intimated they've used illegal drugs. Indeed, many in high places today have been in even higher ones in their youth, touring the outer galaxies of their own minds on acid and other psychedelics. Millions have a unique lens embedded in their minds composed of the rarefied fibers of their hallucinogenic experiences. Meanwhile, many who didn't "turn on" are wondering, "What did I miss?" Still others, psychedelic veterans among them, find “recreational” drugs and the culture of their “indulgence” disquieting, and for good reason from their perspective. Trips, after all, were known to go awry.

As the new millennium begins, the use of psychedelics is again on the rise after tapering off in the 1980s. How could this be happening? Wasn’t the first time around, the convulsive Sixties and Seventies, too unsettling for anybody to want to go back? Well, the fact is that human beings will always want to suspend everyday reality, be it by legal means or otherwise, and they will always be at least curious about alternate states of consciousness, especially those that are consecrated in many of the world’s ancient traditions.

 

 

Veneration for the induced visionary experience has roots in virtually every culture on earth, however sublimated or repressed it is today. In fact, one could argue that the use of visionary plants and hallowed drafts has been seminal to the development of civilization. Two of the most pervasive and influential cultures the planet has ever seen, that of Hellenistic Greece and Aryan India, contained at their very core inspirations derived from the ingestion of psychedelic concoctions.

For two thousand years before its eradication by Christians in the fourth century A.D., the celebration of the Eleusinian Mysteries was the peak-experience of the ancient Greeks, a “holy institution,” according to religion historian Huston Smith, for regularly opening ”a space in the human psyche for God to enter.” After a half year of rites, the pilgrimage to Eleusis just west of Athens climaxed with the re-enactment of a sacred drama that was enhanced by the drinking of  kykeon,  a grainy beverage believed to contain barley ergot. Among notable initiates were Socrates, Plato, Sophocles, Aristotle, Aeschylus, Cicero, Pindar, and possibly Homer. A communion between gods and men, between the living and the dead, the ceremony at Eleusis was a symbolic journey to the underworld to claim back from death Persephone, the daughter of the grain goddess Demeter. The setting for this ur-psychedelic experience was a  telesterion  (initiation hall) at the very site where Persephone is said to have emerged from Hades
with the newborn son she’d conceived in death there. A series of breathtaking, masterfully orchestrated special effects enthralled the senses and conjured the specter of deliverance from the forces of darkness through a ritualized resurrection. The whirlpool of stimuli that washed over initiates involved an Oz-like chimera of voices, music, perfumes, mists, light and shadows. At the peak of the crescendo, the “bellowing roar of a gong-like instrument that outdid…the mightiest thunderclap, coming from the bowels of the earth” announced the arrival of the queen of the netherworld.
                       All were forbidden by penalty of death to tell what they’d seen. According to Carl A.P. Ruck, co-author with R. Gordon Wasson of  The Road to Eleusis  (1978), “Even a poet could only say that he had seen the beginning and the end of life and known that they were one, something given by God. The division between earth and sky melted into a pillar of light.” Of course, some couldn’t hold their tongues about such a marvel. A scandal ensued when some aristocratic Athenians began celebrating the Mysteries at dinner parties in their homes with groups of    “drunken” revelers. Socrates himself was tried and condemned for using the sacred brew recreationally. (Such a profanation of the holy potion might have a modern-day parallel in the spilling of LSD into the well water of the mass media and youth culture during the early Sixties).

                        Notably, the Mysteries were not freely conjured by anyone who could get their hands on the kykeon. They were the exclusive charge of two families who served as hierophants for two thousand years. Clearly, the indoctrination and rites leading up to the swigging of the mash were at least as influential as the concoction itself in weaving the phantasm that stole over the pilgrims’ senses. Such congregational participation and extensive preparation for a psychedelic experience is almost unheard of in the modern West. If anything like the Eleusinian Mysteries had survived the hi-tech world of today, it would almost certainly be diluted and profaned, taking the form of a commercialized adventure-tourism attraction involving a multimedia circus of light and sound somewhat akin to the group-mind experience of a Trance  Festival or a rave. Re-creation of the kykeon brew has proved elusive, however, even to such consummate ergot specialists as Albert Hofmann, who used the fungus in his 1938 invention of LSD.

 

Saturday, 21 December 2013 18:37

Page 2: Interview Raja Ram 2 & 3

Here you can watch, listen and remember the friendly talking between our reporters and the very special people from Goa Freaks World about art, music, culture, space, lifestyle and different bullshit

The legends, myths, mysteries from Hippies till nowadays will be published here to introduce you the history of establishment of World's Psychedelic Culture
 
A Brief History of the Hippie Trail
 
Overland from Europe to Asia in search of Hashish - Origins of the Hippie Trail
 
The roots of the Hippie Trail probably lie with the overland expeditions of the mid-1950s, when small groups of wealthy individuals or sponsored students would travel east from England by Land Rover or Bedford Dormobile to climb mountains or carry out scientific studies and surveys, often publishing accounts of their travels afterwards.
Many who read of such pioneering trips were less interested in science or mountaineering than with the descriptions of the exotic places and cultures on the way. Air travel was in its infancy and prohibitively expensive, but for those seeking adventure the prospect of an epic overland journey was both attractive and increasingly affordable.
The first established British bus company to ply the overland route was The Indiaman in 1957, closely followed by Swagman Tours (later renamed Asian Greyhound). These began as one-man operations catering for a handful of adventurous travellers, and as the economy boomed and the market grew, other bus companies started to spring up in the 1960s.
 
Advent of the Hippies
The first overland travellers who might be described as hippies appeared in about 1967, when the term became shorthand for just about anyone with long hair. The concept of the "mystic east" was gaining interest, and after The Beatles visited India in a blaze of publicity in 1968 the number of young people hitting the road from western Europe began to increase dramatically.
And they weren't all Europeans. Americans and Canadians crossed the Atlantic to take part, Australians and New Zealanders had a strong backpacking tradition and found the route convenient. Westerners of all nationalities were represented.
They had many reasons for going: some sought spiritual enlightenment, some were escaping from a rigid conventional lifestyle, some saw opportunities for profit, and some just wanted to see the world. They all had a sense of adventure, but not all of them could be described as hippies - many were simply keen to explore the overland route to the east, first blazed by Marco Polo.
But from the late 1960s onwards the largest contingent, united by a common interest, were the young people with long hair who gave the hippie trail its name - and what defined the hippie trail was that it led to the major hashish-producing centres of the world.
Afghanistan, Chitral, Kashmir, Nepal - familiar names to the pot-smokers of the sixties and seventies, most of whom knew very little else about the countries where their herb of choice was cultivated. But for the next ten years or so they set off in their thousands to look for it.
Overland bus companies sprang up to cater for them, advertising cheap tickets in the "underground press". They shared the road with a motley procession of private cars, vans, minibuses, even motorbikes. Many vehicles never made it all the way, and many more never made it back. It was, after all, a journey of over 6,000 miles in each direction, and it took in high mountain passes, scorching deserts, and some very rough roads.
Popular legend tells of the Magic Bus that left from Amsterdam - except that it never did. The company was merely a booking agency and didn't actually own any buses. Passengers were found places aboard the scores of independent coaches that plied the route. Other companies such as Budget Bus did actually run their own small fleet of vehicles.
Public transport was another option. Although the railway in those days ended in eastern Turkey, from Istanbul onwards there were cheap local buses, and western drivers also picked up passengers from the city's famous Pudding Shop, where rides in independent vehicles could often be arranged. Access to cheap rail travel resumed in Pakistan and India.
People also hitch-hiked, particularly on the way home, though this was usually only possible in Europe, and the cost of public transport was extremely low in Asia. Westerners who could drive were sometimes paid to take vehicles from Germany to Lebanon or Iran, another way of affording the trip.
 
The Hippie Trail Route
The route of the hippie trail essentially started at Istanbul, the point at which all roads from Europe converged. From here the direct route led straight across Turkey, though some headed south for Lebanon, for centuries the main hashish producer of the Middle East.
From Turkey the route continued across Iran, then a secular country run by the Shah, and on to Afghanistan, the first major destination of the hippie trail, a land where foreigners were made very welcome and where a large proportion of the population used hashish themselves.
After Afghanistan the trail offered many diversions. On entering Pakistan some would head north towards Chitral, but the majority crossed the country and entered India, where a trip up to Kashmir was an immediate option for enthusiastic potheads. Northern India also offered Manali, another popular destination for hippies and another centre of marijuana cultivation.
In winter months most hippies would head south for the beaches of Goa, where hashish was always freely available (though it was not actually produced there). But in the summer the hippie trail ended in the mountains of Nepal, where until 1973 there were many hashish shops operating legally, and where there was no real difficulty obtaining the world's finest charas afterwards.
Visas, where required, could be obtained easily at the borders or towns en route. British passport holders did not require a visa to stay in India long-term.
 
Always A Freak - Never A Hippie
Those who went on the hippie trail often referred to it as "going to India", a shorthand way of describing the trip. They did not call themselves "hippies" anyway, preferring the term "freaks", and in Kathmandu everyone knew where "Freak Street" was (though the official name was Jochen Tole).
While other travellers - those who were not "freaks" - quite reasonably refer to the route as "the overland", there really was a distinct hippie trail. In every major stop along the way there were hotels, restaurants and cafes that catered almost exclusively to the pot-smoking westerners, who networked with each other as they wandered east and west - there were no Lonely Planet guides in those days, and (of course) there was no internet.
This influx of long-haired western youth must have been a curiosity to the locals, who were largely unaccustomed to tourists of any sort back then. But they were generally hospitable, and many found welcome ways to derive extra income. Their experience was caricatured in the 1971 Bollywood movie Hare Rama Hare Krishna, which featured a scene involving chillum-smoking hippies, accompanied by the enormously popular Asha Bosle song Dum Maro Dum.
The hippies tended to spend more time interacting with the local population than traditional sightseeing tourists - they had no interest in luxury accommodation, even if they could afford it (which few could), and some would "go native" after a fashion, particularly in India. Of course, they were still tourists really, albeit of a different sort, and hedonism was the primary aim.
There were casualties, undoubtedly. Staying healthy could be difficult, particularly in Afghanistan, and even hippies can suffer from culture shock. Some would get severely ill, or run out of money, and have to be flown home. Others would wind up in jail, not a pleasant experience anywhere and particularly tough in a third world country.
Most survived, however, and lived to tell the tale on their return, often inspiring others to follow in their footsteps. And a few stayed on, found ways to support themselves, and still live in India.
 
The End of The Road
The classic hippie trail came to an end in 1979, when Islamic revolution in Iran and the Russian invasion of Afghanistan closed the overland route to western travellers. Lebanon had already lapsed into civil war, Chitral and Kashmir became less inviting due to tensions in the area, and even Nepal eventually lost its peace and tranquility.
Air travel had by now become affordable and Goa became the main centre of the hippie scene, based around the village of Anjuna, where hippies had been renting houses for many years before any hotels were built to accommodate the massive influx of tourists in the 1980s.
Those who flew to Goa in later years to partake of the hippie lifestyle doubtless enjoyed themselves, and the more adventurous will have travelled around India and learned from the experience. But the overland hippie trail, which lasted little more than ten years, was gone forever.

 

Saturday, 14 December 2013 16:10

FreakStories - The True Story of Goa Trance

The True Story of Goa Trance. Goa Trance is a sub-genre of electronic dance music – EDM which had started to take its form back in 80’s. However, the very first instigators, ideologists and style formers can be found even further in the past, more accurately – during the period of psychedelic rock in the 60’s and 70’s. Considering the name of this style, it’s easy to relate it with the Indian province called Goa, which is located on the western bank of India.
 
The historical and cultural heritage of Goa is known world-wide, for it was a colony that was fought over during many periods in the past. The first conflicts in that region were between Hindu and Muslim population. These conflicts can be tracked to as far as 10th century, and they had continued all the way to the 16th century. In the year of 1510, Portuguese colonists arrived to Goa. They made a great influence in this Indian province, which can be seen in numerous catholic churches and monasteries that were built during that time. But, the Portuguese were not the only European nation that controlled Goa in the history.
 
The British colonists occupied the region two times. The first period was from 1797. to 1798. and again from 1802. – 1813. During 1961. Indian army seized control over Goa, and integrated it into the sovereign country of India. Multi-cultural history of Goa has its place in history of Goa Trance genre, especially when we point out the very first parties that were organized on the beaches of Goa during the 60’s. According to Ray Castle (one of the first DJs in Goa) the first colonists were hippies which were coming to India seeking spirituality. The second important factor which mostly attracted Europeans (and Americans) to this region was that there was no legal limitation to the consuming of hashish. This was a fact until the mid-70’s when the US government pressed the issue on Indian authorities to ban this practice.
 
Early history of the pioneers of Goa and their first parties was never documented, but according to some witnesses (who were hippies at that time), the first Goa parties were organized in 1968. thanks to eight-finger Eddie who was probably the first modern settler on the beaches of Goa. Together with his friends, he discovered beautiful beaches and got friendly with the local villagers, which gave them a feeling of absolute freedom and happiness, which they had expressed through consuming psychedelic drugs and dancing on the beach. The music at that time did not have any relations to the style of Goa trance, or even with electronic music in general, but the philosophy which they were following is almost the same as the one that Goa trance followers are sharing today.
 
The music that had to do with Goa parties back then was more related to bands like Grateful Dead, The Doors, The Eagles, and Pink Floyd.
 
Fred Disko was one of the first DJs in Goa who started to promote electronic music as well. After all, that decision gave him his “Disko” pseudonym. Besides Fred Disko, there was earlier mentioned Ray Castle, and Goa Gil, who promoted rock/fusion during the 70’s.
 
Later, in the 80’s, Goa Gil started to promote Goa influenced electronic music too, and he gave it a rather “simple” name: the first post-punk experimental electronic dance music coming from Europe, the neue deutsche welle, electronic body music.
 
Ray Castle explained that the very first form of Goa Trance sound could be recognized with bands/projects like Nitzer Ebb, Front 242, Frontline Assembly. Fred Disko also mentioned the influence of classical-traditional Indian music which was easily recognized in Goa trance sound. The symbiosis of these rather different influences was inevitable. The reasons of that symbiosis become very clear, especially when you imagine 10 tablas, 6 sitars and an Indian female vocalist performing a song in the repetitive way, so that you can actually feel like flying. Fred Disko and Ray Cole said that the contemporary “scene” in Goa was formed from a handful of DJs who were mostly people from France, Italy, Germany, Netherlands and Switzerland. The main goal was to exchange and collect the music which was brought from Europe. They were all trying to obtain hard-to-get rare music as much as they could. They also wanted to have rarities which sounded more psychedelic. These quests were labelled as “The quest for weird psychedelic music”. The great part of their inspiration was hidden within the consummation of LSD, the drug which became a symbol of Goa parties, especially because it was easy to get, and mostly free of charge. It was known as “free acid punch”.
 
DJs of the late 80’s had often used DATs for their DJ sets, but the preparations for the show were hard and time-consuming. According to Steve Psyko (he was also one of the first Goa DJs), the DJs would often cut-out the parts of the songs mixing them with other tracks, in order to create a mega-mix which would be played at the parties later on. The use of vinyl records was not practiced because of the risk that the vinyl could actually melt due to high temperatures.
 
Ray Castle recalls one time when DJ Sven Vath came to Goa with all his records, in order to become “Techno pope of India”. However, that didn't work out well, because you just have to be used to DATs on such high temperatures. Paul Chambers (British Goa trance DJ) recalls his trips to Goa and the very first electronic music parties that were held there. There were no more than 200 people on those events. The decorations were really colourful but not numerous and there were a few black-light lamps around. The first police raids occurred during the 1990. but the situation became better in 1991. and 1992. It was during these years, that the first hype and rush to Goa had started.
 
The number of people on parties noticeably increased, and the numbers were from 500 to 1500 visitors. More and more people were coming to Goa, especially from Israel and Japan. With the increasing number of tourists that arrived to Goa to dance, consume drugs and live a free life, the whole underground feeling started to fade, and the music itself started to become more and more popular. This was even more supported by numerous English and other European DJs and publishers, which resulted in first releases in the 1993. The release which was probably the most influential for Goa trance uprising was the Project II Trance, released by Dragonfly Records.
 
This release featured artists like Gumbo, Genetic, The Infinity Project, Total Eclipse, Mandra Gora and others. Except for Goa trance in India, parties started to occur in other parts of the world, and the most known ones were in Byron Bay (Australia), where many hippies found their new place for Goa trance, since more and more tourists were visiting Goa and the scene was booming. In England, the first Goa trance parties were organized in London and Manchester. It was interesting that almost the very same DJs performed in Goa and in England, and the visitors were mostly the same in the both areas. It was just a matter of season where the caravan will be settled. after Goa trance found its place in electronic music scene, many new artists, publishers and DJs had emerged. It would take a lot of time to mention all of the names which took part in the scene during the six golden years of Goa trance (1993-1999).
 
We want to mention only some of the most notorius  RECORD LABELS : Dragonfly / Perfecto Fluoro / Flying Rhino / Blue Room Released / Matsuri Productions / TIP Records / Symbiosis / Krembo / BooM / Platipus / RETURN TO THE SOURCE / PSYCHIC DELI / Phantasm / Transient / PHONOKOL.
 
Also we will remind you a true heroes of the past, the messengers of Space, those DJs, who started from the very beginning of Goa Trance scene and spread the music around the Globe: PAUL OAKENFOLD, GOA GIL, RAY CASTLE, STEVE PSYKO, FRED DISKO, RICKARD AHLBERG, DOMINIC LAMB, SVEN VATH, TSUYOSHI SUZUKI, PLANET B.E.N., MARK ALLEN, LORAN, OFIR DIKOVSKI SHIVA JORG,OLLIE WISDOM MIKO
 
Sad fact- almost all of these artists are the history now, and real Goa trance era finished in early 2000. We will regret about that times always as the best times of our life.
 

Friday, 15 November 2013 08:50

Interview - Raja Ram 1 & 2

In this section we will present to you the exclusive interviews with the very special people in Goa Psychedelic Culture.
Today we finally present you first two parts of the exclusive video interview of double trouble trance gang. Two of the oldest and eldest Goa Freaks opening their hearts and refreshing the memories of good old days. Raja Ram and Chicago, live from Goa... Amazing video. Must Watch and listen.

Monday, 22 July 2013 06:11

Hallucinogens - the Bicycle Day

The "Bicycle Day": the day of LSD Discovery

April 19, 1943, Hofmann performed a self-experiment to determine the true effects of LSD, intentionally ingesting 0.25 milligrams (250 micrograms) of the substance, an amount he predicted to be a threshold dose (an actual threshold dose is 20 micrograms). Less than an hour later, Hofmann experienced sudden and intense changes in perception. He asked his laboratory assistant to escort him home and, as use of motor vehicles was prohibited because of wartime restrictions, they had to make the journey on a bicycle. On the way, Hofmann’s condition rapidly deteriorated as he struggled with feelings of anxiety, alternating in his beliefs that the next-door neighbor was a malevolent witch, that he was going insane, and that the LSD had poisoned him. When the house doctor arrived, however, he could detect no physical abnormalities, save for a pair of incredibly dilated pupils. Hofmann was reassured, and soon his terror began to give way to a sense of good fortune and enjoyment, as he later wrote...

    "... little by little I could begin to enjoy the unprecedented colors and plays of shapes that persisted behind my closed eyes. Kaleidoscopic, fantastic images surged in on me, alternating, variegated, opening and then closing themselves in circles and spirals, exploding in colored fountains, rearranging and hybridizing themselves in constant flux ..."

The events of the first LSD trip, now known as “Bicycle Day”, after the bicycle ride home, proved to Hofmann that he had indeed made a significant discovery: a psychoactive substance with extraordinary potency, capable of causing significant shifts of consciousness in incredibly low doses. Hofmann foresaw the drug as a powerful psychiatric tool; because of its intense and introspective nature, he couldn’t imagine anyone using it recreationally. Bicycle day is increasingly observed in psychedelic communities as a day to celebrate the discovery of LSD.

The celebration of Bicycle Day originated in DeKalb, IL., in 1985, when Thomas B. Roberts, then a Professor at Northern Illinois University, invented the name "Bicycle Day" founded the first Bicycle Day celebration at his home. Several years later, he sent an announcement made by one of his students to friends and Internet lists, thus propagating the idea and the celebration. His original intent was to commemorate Hofmann's original, accidental exposure on April 16, but that date fell midweek and was not a good time for the party, so he chose the 19th to honor Hofmann's first intentional exposure.
 
Discovery of the Psychic Effects of LSD
The solution of the ergotoxine problem had led to fruitful results, described here only briefly, and had opened up further avenues of research. And yet I could not forget the relatively uninteresting LSD-25. A peculiar presentiment—the feeling that this substance could possess properties other than those established in the first investigations—induced me, five years after the first synthesis, to produce LSD-25 once again so that a sample could be given to the pharmacological department for further tests. This was quite unusual; experimental substances, as a rule, were definitely stricken from the research program if once found to be lacking in pharmacological interest.
    Nevertheless, in the spring of 1943, I repeated the synthesis of LSD-25. As in the first synthesis, this involved the production of only a few centigrams of the compound.
    In the final step of the synthesis, during the purification and crystallization of lysergic acid diethylamide in the form of a tartrate (tartaric acid salt), I was interrupted in my work by unusual sensations.

The following description of this incident comes from the report that I sent at the time to Professor Stoll:

    Last Friday, April 16,1943, I was forced to interrupt my work in the laboratory in the middle of the afternoon and proceed home, being affected by a remarkable restlessness, combined with a slight dizziness. At home I lay down and sank into a not unpleasant intoxicated-like condition, characterized by an extremely stimulated imagination. In a dreamlike state, with eyes closed (I found the daylight to be unpleasantly glaring), I perceived an uninterrupted stream of fantastic pictures, extraordinary shapes with intense, kaleidoscopic play of colors. After some two hours this condition faded away.

    This was, altogether, a remarkable experience—both in its sudden onset and its extraordinary course. It seemed to have resulted from some external toxic influence; I surmised a connection with the substance I had been working with at the time, lysergic acid diethylamide tartrate. But this led to another question: how had I managed to absorb this material? Because of the known toxicity of ergot substances, I always maintained meticulously neat work habits. Possibly a bit of the LSD solution had contacted my fingertips during crystallization, and a trace of the substance was absorbed through the skin. If LSD-25 had indeed been the cause of this bizarre experience, then it must be a substance of extraordinary potency. There seemed to be only one way of getting to the bottom of this. I decided on a self-experiment.
    Exercising extreme caution, I began the planned series of experiments with the smallest quantity that could be expected to produce some effect, considering the activity of the ergot alkaloids known at the time: namely, 0.25 mg (mg = milligram = one thousandth of a gram) of lysergic acid diethylamide tartrate. Quoted below is the entry for this experiment in my laboratory journal of April 19, 1943.


Self-Experiments


 4/19/43 16:20: 0.5 cc of 1/2 promil aqueous solution of diethylamide tartrate orally = 0.25 mg tartrate. Taken diluted with about 10 cc water. Tasteless.
    17:00: Beginning dizziness, feeling of anxiety, visual distortions, symptoms of paralysis, desire to laugh.
    Supplement of 4/21: Home by bicycle. From 18:00- ca.20:00 most severe crisis. (See special report.)


    Here the notes in my laboratory journal cease.
I was able to write the last words only with great effort. By now it was already clear to me that LSD had been the cause of the remarkable experience of the previous Friday, for the altered perceptions were of the same type as before, only much more intense. I had to struggle to speak intelligibly. I asked my laboratory assistant, who was informed of the self-experiment, to escort me home. We went by bicycle, no automobile being available because of wartime restrictions on their use. On the way home, my condition began to assume threatening forms. Everything in my field of vision wavered and was distorted as if seen in a curved mirror. I also had the sensation of being unable to move from the spot. Nevertheless, my assistant later told me that we had traveled very rapidly. Finally, we arrived at home safe and sound, and I was just barely capable of asking my companion to summon our family doctor and request milk from the neighbors.

    In spite of my delirious, bewildered condition, I had brief periods of clear and effective thinking—and chose milk as a nonspecific antidote for poisoning.

    The dizziness and sensation of fainting became so strong at times that I could no longer hold myself erect, and had to lie down on a sofa. My surroundings had now transformed themselves in more terrifying ways. Everything in the room spun around, and the familiar objects and pieces of furniture assumed grotesque, threatening forms. They were in continuous motion, animated, as if driven by an inner restlessness. The lady next door, whom I scarcely recognized, brought me milk—in the course of the evening I drank more than two liters. She was no longer Mrs. R., but rather a malevolent, insidious witch with a colored mask.
    Even worse than these demonic transformations of the outer world, were the alterations that I perceived in myself, in my inner being. Every exertion of my will, every attempt to put an end to the disintegration of the outer world and the dissolution of my ego, seemed to be wasted effort. A demon had invaded me, had taken possession of my body, mind, and soul. I jumped up and screamed, trying to free myself from him, but then sank down again and lay helpless on the sofa. The substance, with which I had wanted to experiment, had vanquished me. It was the demon that scornfully triumphed over my will. I was seized by the dreadful fear of going insane. I was taken to another world, another place, another time. My body seemed to be without sensation, lifeless, strange. Was I dying? Was this the transition? At times I believed myself to be outside my body, and then perceived clearly, as an outside observer, the complete tragedy of my situation. I had not even taken leave of my family (my wife, with our three children had traveled that day to visit her parents, in Lucerne). Would they ever understand that I had not experimented thoughtlessly, irresponsibly, but rather with the utmost caution, an-d that such a result was in no way foreseeable? My fear and despair intensified, not only because a young family should lose its father, but also because I dreaded leaving my chemical research work, which meant so much to me, unfinished in the midst of fruitful, promising development. Another reflection took shape, an idea full of bitter irony: if I was now forced to leave this world prematurely, it was because of this Iysergic acid diethylamide that I myself had brought forth into the world.
   
By the time the doctor arrived, the climax of my despondent condition had already passed. My laboratory assistant informed him about my self-experiment, as I myself was not yet able to formulate a coherent sentence. He shook his head in perplexity, after my attempts to describe the mortal danger that threatened my body. He could detect no abnormal symptoms other than extremely dilated pupils. Pulse, blood pressure, breathing were all normal. He saw no reason to prescribe any medication. Instead he conveyed me to my bed and stood watch over me. Slowly I came back from a weird, unfamiliar world to reassuring everyday reality. The horror softened and gave way to a feeling of good fortune and gratitude, the more normal perceptions and thoughts returned, and I became more confident that the danger of insanity was conclusively past.
    Now, little by little I could begin to enjoy the unprecedented colors and plays of shapes that persisted behind my closed eyes. Kaleidoscopic, fantastic images surged in on me, alternating, variegated, opening and then closing themselves in circles and spirals, exploding in colored fountains, rearranging and hybridizing themselves in constant flux. It was particularly remarkable how every acoustic perception, such as the sound of a door handle or a passing automobile, became transformed into optical perceptions. Every sound generated a vividly changing image, with its own consistent form and color.
    Late in the evening my wife returned from Lucerne. Someone had informed her by telephone that I was suffering a mysterious breakdown. She had returned home at once, leaving the children behind with her parents. By now, I had recovered myself sufficiently to tell her what had happened.
    Exhausted, I then slept, to awake next morning refreshed, with a clear head, though still somewhat tired physically. A sensation of well-being and renewed life flowed through me. Breakfast tasted delicious and gave me extraordinary pleasure. When I later walked out into the garden, in which the sun shone now after a spring rain, everything glistened and sparkled in a fresh light. The world was as if newly created. All my senses vibrated in a condition of highest sensitivity, which persisted for the entire day.

   
This self-experiment showed that LSD-25 behaved as a psychoactive substance with extraordinary properties and potency. There was to my knowledge no other known substance that evoked such profound psychic effects in such extremely low doses, that caused such dramatic changes in human consciousness and our experience of the inner and outer world.
    What seemed even more significant was that I could remember the experience of LSD inebriation in every detail. This could only mean that the conscious recording function was not interrupted, even in the climax of the LSD experience, despite the profound breakdown of the normal world view. For the entire duration of the experiment, I had even been aware of participating in an experiment, but despite this recognition of my condition, I could not, with every exertion of my will, shake off the LSD world. Everything was experienced as completely real, as alarming reality; alarming, because the picture of the other, familiar everyday reality was still fully preserved in the memory for comparison.
    Another surprising aspect of LSD was its ability to produce such a far-reaching, powerful state of inebriation without leaving a hangover. Quite the contrary, on the day after the LSD experiment I felt myself to be, as already described, in excellent physical and mental condition.

    I was aware that LSD, a new active compound with such properties, would have to be of use in pharmacology, in neurology, and especially in psychiatry, and that it would attract the interest of concerned specialists. But at that time I had no inkling that the new substance would also come to be used beyond medical science, as an inebriant in the drug scene. Since my self-experiment had revealed LSD in its terrifying, demonic aspect, the last thing I could have expected was that this substance could ever find application as anything approaching a pleasure drug. I failed, moreover, to recognize the meaningful connection between LSD inebriation and spontaneous visionary experience until much later, after further experiments, which were carried out with far lower doses and under different conditions.
    The next day I wrote to Professor Stoll the above-mentioned report about my extraordinary experience with LSD-25 and sent a copy to the director of the pharmacological department, Professor Rothlin.
    As expected, the first reaction was incredulous astonishment. Instantly a telephone call came from the management; Professor Stoll asked: "Are you certain you made no mistake in the weighing? Is the stated dose really correct?" Professor Rothlin also called, asking the same question. I was certain of this point, for I had executed the weighing and dosage with my own hands. Yet their doubts were justified to some extent, for until then no known substance had displayed even the slightest psychic effect in fraction-of-a-milligram doses. An active compound of such potency seemed almost unbelievable.
    Professor Rothlin himself and two of his colleagues were the first to repeat my experiment, with only one-third of the dose I had utilized. But even at that level, the effects were still extremely impressive, and quite fantastic. All doubts about the statements in my report were eliminated.
 
Published in NEWS Archives
Sunday, 03 March 2013 06:50

Cultural History of Tripping part4

 The Psychedelic in Society:
A Brief Cultural History of Tripping part 4

…Since the cataclysms of the Sixties and Seventies, a more tenacious if less overtly messianic subculture has grown up around the psychedelic. Nowhere in the industrial world is psychedelic consciousness more above-board and appreciated than in the computer software business, where it is regarded as the inspiration for cybernetics -- the very definition of twenty-first century communications efficiency -- by many of its most illustrious practitioners.
 
 
According to Jaron Lanier, a pioneer in the virtual reality industry, “…almost to a person, the founders of the [personal] computer industry were psychedelic style hippies…..
Within the computer science community there’s a very strong connection with the ‘60s psychedelic tradition, absolutely no question about it.

In the TNT docudrama Pirates of Silicon Valley (1999), Apple founder Steve Jobs is depicted on an acid trip in which he conceives himself the conductor of his own cosmic symphony.
 
Bob Wallace, one of the early developers of Microsoft, who now runs Mind Books, the online purveyor of tomes devoted to psychedelic and alternative consciousness, has said that his conception of shareware as a formal business application was psychedelically inspired. Lotus spreadsheet designer Mitchell Kapor, co-founder with Grateful Dead lyricist John Perry Barlow of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an Internet advocacy organization, has attributed certain “recreational chemicals” with sharpening his business acumen. Bob Jesse left his position as vice president of business development at Oracle, the world’s second largest software company after Microsoft, to head the Council on Spiritual Practices, a non-profit organization that advocates (among other things) the responsible use of entheogens (divine-manifesting drugs) for religious purposes.

 
Such a marriage of technology and psychedelic consciousness – and a resoundingly profitable and influential one at that -- might have been foretold by Marshall McLuhan’s 1968 observation that “the computer is the LSD of the business world.”
            The possibility that industrial success might in any way be attributed to the psychedelic is not overtly bantered about in Wall Street boardrooms, where psychedelic acuity is not yet measured out in lucre as an asset or variable in a company’s fortunes. But according to author and media theorist Douglas Rushkoff, firms “such as Sun Microsystems that lead the Valley of the Nerds [Silicon Valley] recognize the popularity of psychedelics among their employees.” You need only one look at the covers of the cyber-age magazines Wired and Mondo 2000 to conclude that the computer cognizant have had at least some contact with the whirring currents of the psychedelic Mainframe.

            The phrase “We’re all connected!,” often exclaimed during a psychedelic experience, might just as well be uttered by a PC user tapping into the mycelium-like World Wide Web for the first time. Cyberspace is, in many respects, an electronic mirror of the hyper spatial web of synaptic nerves running through the Universal Mind, the Indra’s Net of impulses and receptor sites that some say they’ve accessed by psychedelics.
 
(According to ancient myth, Indra, the king of the Hindu pantheon, created a vast web comprised of strings of jewels. Each jewel both reflected and was reflected by all the others, thus revealing both its uniqueness and its universality.) A sort of invisible yet real medium of contact between any and all points, cyberspace is a habitat for the mitosis-like proliferation of the idea germs called memes, and an endless mind field on which to explode the fractal equations that portray the parallel orders of controlled chaos in the universe.

There is no doubt that with the advent of the new millennium, the psychedelic culture will continue to rise, both responsibly and otherwise, as psychedelics are increasingly seen as tools for penetrating the veils of quotidian maya and mass-media illusion spun by corporate greed. According to the best hopes of the new psychedelic vanguard, the expanded intelligent use of these plants and chemicals will usher in an eon of shamanic vistas and stronger definitions true to primordial forms: a pagan, aboriginal order in which the spirit will reign pre-eminent.

THE END

 

Published in NEWS Archives
Page 1 of 2

Related articles SF

Sunday Freak Magazines

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6