Others Articles ' Psychedelic Readings ' Sunday Freaks 12

Tuesday, 07 April 2015 06:27

A View of Goa - Aerial video of north Goa

Aerial video of north Goa,
India, (Terakol, Kerim and Arambol.)

Shot using a GoPro3+ on DJI Phantom 2 with a Zenmuse H3-3D Gimble.

Motorbikes by HighRide Customs
Music by Eddie Vedder
Video by by DUARTE MARTORELL
Published in NEWS Archives
Sunday, 07 December 2014 19:08

Alternative Goa Lifestyle Guide

This is a new media product of www.goa-freaks.com
First ever interactive guide dedicated to Goa Alternative Lifestyle. The guide will be updated every two weeks to give you the widest and verified information about all aspects you might be interested in while visiting 
 Last Paradise on Earth.
 
Compared to other tourist almanacs we will provide you only with tested, absolutely trusted  and recommended choices of companies, products, places, parties, news and etc.  
 
Main purpose of this project is a creation of Goa Virtual Space to support those travellers, visitors and inhabitants, who chose Goa as their preferred seasonal destination and getaway from the System and society. 
 
Once published, this Guide will be online forever with optimal possibility to add new articles, reports, interviews and your promotions and advertising.
 
 We offer you to join a project and to present inside the Guide your own products and goods, your music or clubs, events or places of interests, etc, etc.
 
 

 

Sunday, 28 September 2014 06:40

Goa 90 s Gallery

Sunday, 28 September 2014 06:23

Unveiling The Secret - The Roots of Trance

Unveiling The Secret - The Roots of Trance
by Dave Mothersole
 
So there we were, three fresh faced, south London former soul-boys in bashed up Armani jeans and Converse, huddled together on the back of a motorbike taxi, heading off to our first party.  “We’ll show these hippies what it’s all about” I thought as the driver, perched up on the bike’s tank, deftly negotiated the pot holes and a million insects buzzed away in the warm night air.  It was late August 1986 and still monsoon time.  As we grew closer I could see dozens of Royal Enfields haphazardly abandoned on the pathway that lead to the carcass of the old Catholic church where the party was being held.  Groups of people were sat around outside smoking chillums.  Some looked up and stared as we passed by and it began to dawn on me that this might not turn out quite as I’d expected.  Nothing though, could prepare me for the shock I got as we walked inside. 
 
It was like stepping into another world.  UV pictures of blacksploitation babes and leather clad joy boys hung from the walls as the speakers pumped out these dark, synthetic beats.  Wild eyed loons in flip flops and rags leapt about next to girls who looked like they had just walked in off some Milanese cat walk.  An American kid in his late teens dressed in a Mickey Mouse tracksuit and sporting the best Billy Idol haircut I’d ever seen, walked up and offered us some liquid acid. “Full trip or half trip” he leered, pulling out a whacking great needle-less syringe and gesturing at us to hold out our hands for a dose.  “Could change your life” he said with a sly chemical grin and an air of overbearing superiority.  I went for half, holding out my nervously clenched fist in a mixture of curiosity and fear. 
 
Outside Indian chi ladies from the local villages had set up little stalls selling tea and cakes and all around people were dancing like it was their last night on earth.  Clouds of pungent Manali smoke filled the air as the incessant, narcotic groove chugged away like a runaway train.  It was like Lord Of The Flies and H.G. Wells’ Time Machine in a blender with an acid fried version of Miami Vice.  A post apocalyptic Monte Carlo, reclaimed by nature and inhabited by a tribe of wild, decadent, jet set gypsies partying their way into some new collective consciousness. 
 
 Far from showing them what it was all about, we looked on in a mixture of horror, fascination and wide eyed disbelief.   Passive observes who’d stumbled across this weird bacchanalian scene.  In a church, at the end of a dirt track.  A few thousand miles from where we from, but a million miles from anything we knew.  As defining year zero moments go, this was a major one for me.  I’d expected to find a few burnt out pot heads singing Bob Marley songs around a campfire.  Not this.  That American kid was right - life was never quite the same again.
 
 
 
To understand how a bunch of western misfits, searchers, junkies and fugitives ended up dancing to a mutant strain of proto-techno on a beach on the Arabian sea, you have to go back to the late 60’s.  The story of how Goa became a magnet for freaks the world over, can be seen in the excellent Facebook documentary, Goa Hippy Tribe.  Suffice to say though, by the mid 70’s, the full moon parties were in full swing with bands playing all night on big four way speaker stacks.  Come the early 80’s, the original crowd of hedonistic settlers had been joined by a new generation, many of them European, who brought their own music with them. 
 
It’s unclear exactly who set up the first electronic music parties in Goa - some credit a character called Dr Bobby (father of Tiga) - but it is known that many of the new arrivals would frequent clubs in Ibiza, London, Berlin, Rimini and Riccione when they returned to Europe for the summer.  It’s also clear that they had little or no attachment to the 70’s rock favoured by the original crowd.  Initially they were met with some fierce resistance, but by 1983 electronic music had pretty much taken over.  And so it was that at the same time that Chicago was creating House and Detroit was forging ahead with what would become Techno, the roots of Trance were being sawn on the beaches of Anjuna and Vagator.  And just as Chicago had Ron Hardy and Detroit had The Electrifying Mojo, Goa had a DJ called Laurent.  If it wasn’t for him, it’s quite possible that the music played at parties in Goa would have been little more than a carbon copy of what was going on back in Europe and America.  But like all true pioneers, Laurent made it much more than the sum of it’s parts and in doing so created a whole new style of music. 
 
 
 
Legend has it that when he left France for Goa he told his family he’d be back in a couple of months, never to return. Whether this is real or not is anyone’s guess. * Goa has always has been a place that lives on rumours and half truths and separating fact from fiction has never been easy.  For his part, Laurent credits fellow Frenchman Fred Disko with being the first person to play electronic music in Goa.  And there were of course others like Swiss Rudi, Stefano and the now ubiquitous Gil.  But it was Laurent who defined the style and set the parameters for what would become Trance. 
He took all the new electronic music coming out of Europe and America, cut out most of the vocals and parts he didn’t like, extended the parts he did and stitched it all together into one long, constantly morphing psychedelic groove.  New Wave, Italo-disco, EBM, New Beat, Goth, Electro, Hi-NRG, Synth-pop, House – anything was up for grabs.  As long as it had the right vibe, it could be made to fit.  But unlike his DJ counter parts in the West, Laurent didn’t use records - the heat and dust in Goa made that imposible - he used cassettes. 
 
Tapes had been played at parties in Goa ever since the introduction of amplified music and by the early 80’s the Sony profesional walkman was the deck of choice.  It was hard wearing, sounded good and it had a pitch control.  It also had a mechanical pause button with a very precise action.  This was imperative, not just for playing live, but also as a way to re-edit and re-arrange tracks.  Many of the biggest hits in Goa during the 80’s were substantially re-edited, often to take out any unwanted vocals, but also to extend some of the rhythmic passages.  Laurent’s re-edits of  Blancmange’s “Living On The Ceiling”, Boytronic’s “Hurts” and Soft Cell’s “Sex Dwarf” are legendary examples, but many other songs had the same treatment. 
 
Removing the vocals was considered important as they would often distract from the dancer’s trip.  However, it did depended on what type of vocal it was.  Anything that sounded pop-y was out, but more abstract subject matter, especially if delivered in a “New Wave” style voice, was allowed. So acts like Depeche Mode, Psyche and Front 242 were often played with the vocals intact, whilst Den Harrow, for example, wasn’t. 
 
But whilst singing was often removed, newsreel and documentary style voices were used a lot.  And as LSD and Manali charas were the most prevalent drugs at parties, the audiences were very susceptible to the content of these soundbites.  Religion, re-birth, the cold war, drugs, time travel, mysticism, nuclear disaster and sci-fi were all popular themes and at times it felt like these messages were being beamed down directly from space. That we were God’s chosen ones; his disco dancing, cosmic flower children; ecstatically gyrating our way, shiva-like into new realms and  understanding.
 
 
 
That’s probably why Laurent’s style caught on.  By taking the psychedelic aspects of experimental rock and applying them to electronic dance music, he had created a sound that was both accessible and otherworldly.  It was functional too, which was important because like any other DJ, his success depended on his ability to make people dance.  The demographic in Goa at that time was quite wide, with the age range going from 18-50 and the male to female ratio being fairly even.  His skill was to get all these people on board whilst simultaneously pioneering a new style of music.  And like all truly great DJs he was able to do this because he had the ability to make records translate.  Tracks like Orient Affair’s “Classic Dance” or Hypnosis’ “Droid” may have sounded a bit camp or even pompous back in Europe, but they were given a strange poignancy as 500 people kicked up dust clouds under the coconut palms. 
 
Messing with song tempos was another Laurent trademark and you would often hear him slowing Hi-NRG tracks down to around 100bpm.  He really understood the importance of context.  How, because of the drugs, the mind blowing locations and the tribalistic nature of Goan beach parties, he could make tracks feel and sound different.  
 
Playing for anything up to 10 hours at a time he would move from dark, hard hypnotic beats during the night, to sweet, uplifting, sun kissed grooves in the morning.  From Skinny Puppy and Nitzer Ebb to Koto and Laser Dance; from 100 to 150bpm; from nightmare-ish and scary to blissed out and glorious.  It was a heady combination and one that had a tremendous impact on the lives of many.
 
After that first party I stayed in Anjuna for a few months as the season picked up, before travelling around India. I went back to Goa the following year and fully immersed myself in the freak lifestyle. It was a wonderful time and I was lucky enough to be a part of some truly amazing parties. When I got back, Acid House had started to happen in England, so I got involved in that and gradually lost touch with the Goa scene.
 
I’m not fan of what Trance became.  As soon as people started calling it Psy-Trance and making music with Goa in mind, it lost its way for me.  That’s fine though.  I’m not a fan of what Punk became either -  but that doesn’t stop The Clash being my favourite band.  Just because Trance became a narrow, soulless succession of drug triggers, that doesn’t take anything away from what  Laurent did back in the 80’s and early 90’s.  His legacy goes beyond way beyond such limitations.
 
Apparently he’s stil living in Goa, doing his thing, shunning the limelight and occasionally turning down interviews with visiting journalists.  The real father of Trance.  A true legend.
 

 

Sunday, 28 September 2014 06:07

The Golden Days of Goa Trance

The early to mid 90’s were a very special time to be in Goa.

I used to think Goa Trance was little more than a bunch of repetitive beats and irritating samples of people saying hey, this must be heaven, man! It was only when I came of age and spent a few seasons in Goa taking acid that it began to make sense.

Perceptions of the music were as subjective as the psychedelic experience. No one could seem to agree much on what made good trance. After every party, no matter how great a time everyone had, there were always but always people bitching about the music. The tracks were too old, they were badly mixed or the DJ wasn’t stoned enough. Perhaps one of the worse things about the whole phenomenon of the trance movement is that it spawned a whole new generation of music critics who considered themselves expert in the field.

But this was precisely because the music was so personal, melding as it did with your particular trip. Either way the music gave you the waves but it was up to you to surf them. At it’s best dancing to trance could be better than sex. At it’s worst, however, it became a cruel, mental torture that messed your head up all night.


In Goa I usually went to bed early and the woke up at around 3:30 am to go to the party. That gave me time to shit, shower and get my party gear ready. I’d need my torch to find my way through the jungle to the beat that was already calling me, money to buy my drop of acid and fluids and I learnt to take a packet of dehydration salts with me.

By the time I found my way to the party it was hoped that most of the darker characters had already gone home and soon the cooler crowd would be arriving. Old Goan mamas held reign on their chai mats, serving tea and cakes to stoned freaks who had no idea which pocket their money was in. The DJ occupied a discreet post somewhere to the side and there was minimal lighting on the dance floor itself.
Goa Gil

The night could be hellish. Many people actually liked it that way, dancing through the dark in a painful anonymity, exorcising their demons before the dawn. Then with dawn you’d hear a wave of motorbike engines and feel a new energy taking hold of the party. The light began to grow and you’d suddenly realize what a beautiful place you were in. The dance floor swelled and hundreds of people would suddenly go wild as the DJ unleashed a new mood.

It was also the time when you saw who you’d been dancing with all night. You’d drift through the dance floor, testing the waters, looking for the space that suited you the best. Ideally no one stood about or talked and you’d feel the personalities of hundreds of people as expressed through dance. There were the hoof and elbow stampers of the Israeli chieftains, the springs and twirls of Greek nymphs and the martial aerobics of Japanese travellers exploring the meaning of freedom for the first time. The parties attracted characters and personalities from all over the world, people with dance that more resembled theatre and they generated energy wherever they went.

Most people were too high to care what anyone thought of them and were free to explore themselves and their personal journeys as far as their dance could take them. It was a medium that conducted the flow of thoughts and feelings in a way that word could never do. You found movements to express your anger, sadness or love. There were rarely any strong sexual vibes and most people were too high to even entertain the concept. Instead you were free to play roles as you moved and feel how everyone reacted to your personal dance. At its best it was a kind of group therapy.

At the end of a party you had gotten to know around a hundred people without ever talking to them. You knew who your friends on the dance floor were although you probably never exchanged a word. Often you might not even see them again until the next party and then you’d continue from where you left off. Soul mates recognized each other for the first time and no one could hide who they were. As dawn hit at one party I felt a tap on my shoulder from a young Portuguese DJ – he squeezed a drop of liquid acid onto my palm and twisted away into the dance floor before I could even smile.

As with any congregation you felt part of something greater than yourself. It was something more conductive than water where any wave of energy could spread through the dance floor in a moment. A fight, an embrace or a new arrival were all things you felt without using any of the five senses. It was like melding into some electrical field or making love to 300 hundred people at once.

The dust rose with the day and soon everyone’s nostrils and lips would be lined with red sand. You could feel a bottle of water being opened a 50 meters behind you and you’d all dance on even when you had no more strength to do so. Then it would suddenly all be over. After 7 hours of psychedelic experience you’d suddenly understand how the music had formed part of you, how it had flowed down your veins and poured out again as sweat. Lost and bewildered, you’d amble about in the sudden silence like soldiers after a battle, unsure of where your destiny lay next.

Other times it was pure hell. You’d turn up, drop acid and then be unable to find anywhere on the dance floor where you weren’t being hassled by some idiot. I remember one night where I danced for an hour next to a huge Scandinavian who stood about with a large rucksack on, sighing and glaring at everyone. Finally he grabbed me with one hand and with the other held a small Indian boy who was trying to sell something. I spun away before he could hit me.

When it wasn’t going well you could read the uncertainty and suffering on people’s faces. You’d join forces with a few other dancers and try to create some energy together but then a water salesman would set down his boxes between you and start counting his money. ´Get out of my fucking temple!´ I’d want to shout but these were the local mafia and the last thing you needed on acid was an enemy.

The New Year Goa Parties

The New Year’s parties were always the most chaotic. Thousands of tourists and Indians turned up for 48 hours of unmitigated anarchy. The Indians from the interior were the most irritating nerds imaginable. They walked down the beach fully dressed, socks and shoes and all to take photos of girls in bikinis. This was my girlfriend in Goa, they tell their friends back home. At night they’d become hopelessly drunk and every year a couple of them would drown as they tried to swim for the first time in their lives.

Frequently at the parties you found yourself playing policeman on the dance floor as you prevented hordes of Indians from surrounding unsuspecting Western girls. When one friend of mine tried to intervene at a New Year’s party the Indian in question withdrew a full length sword. He waved it around a bit until everyone kept their distance and then walked around with it the whole night. Oh-oh, there’s the lunatic with the sword again,´ people murmured and moved away.

New Year was also when the Goans got their own back on the arrogant Indian tourists who had been treating them like shit for weeks. Gangs of Goan lads looked for drunken tour groups from Bombay and then beat the shit out of them in the forest.

 

In the end it was always better to look for the smaller parties where you had a chance of finding friends. You never really knew what might happen to you or when you might need help. On my 21st birthday I was at a party and someone gave me a shot of acid punch. Someone must have made a mistake with the maths though as instead of a 100 micrograms I ended up taking closer to a 1000.

I spent a good deal of the night in a state of emergency, reminding myself every couple of seconds that it was time to breathe again. I could barely see or stand up in the storm of perception and found myself in the morning sitting next to a fire somewhere at the back of the party. I had precious little idea of where I was or what I was going to do. A friendly face arrived at my side and I managed to recognize it as belonging to my friend, Isaac.

“Isaac, I’m, uh, the night was, like, difficult, ah,. I don’t know how, I mean, difficult, is your motorbike with you?”

“Sure, where do you need to go? “

“Ah, I’m not sure-”

“Oh, did you have a bad trip?”

“Yeah.”

Once I managed to communicate that the word got around that my night had been rougher than most, there was a crowd of people looking to help. As I had no home at the time I was taken back to the house of some friends to be babysat. They fed me papaya and yogurt until the afternoon when I got my head together enough to head back to the beach.

Parties in the Himalayas

In general the family feeling was stronger in the mountains where the parties were smaller and more personal. Everything was a lot more work in the mountains and ensured that only dedicated freaks got to the parties. They were generally staged about 3 hours walk up the slopes and the hike in the darkness almost killed us. Once there was a party held at the house of a friend just one hour above our village. That evening however a heavy mist rolled in and by midnight no one had shown up.

“There were just five of us and a huge sound system,” my friend told me. “We thought no one was going to turn up. But then around 1am the wind picked up and swept the mist away. Suddenly we could see torchlight up and down the mountainside, hanging onto every rock and cliff imaginable. Everyone had got lost in the mist.”

In the full moon the snow-capped mountains gleamed blue and everyone in the party looked like an angel. Here we danced from midnight through till noon and in the morning the villagers came out to laugh at all the strange foreigners bouncing around in circus clothing. No matter how bad your night had been you couldn’t help but be blown away by the view in the morning and that was alchemy enough for most people. You could feel the whole mountain waking up and then just as suddenly as the dawn had turned the snow peaks pink, low-level clouds would roll in and you’d find yourself breathing water. If it rained on a cold night you ran the risk of breaking your ankle in the mud or catching pneumonia. Somehow it all seemed worth taking the risk.

All good things come to an end, they say. Maybe they just move on. I turned up at some of the same parties in the mountains a few years later and it was like taking a picnic at high altitude. Everyone sat around smoking and had no idea of what a party should be.
 
"IF IN THE CHURCH OF PSYTRANCE CROWD IS A FLOCK, MUSICIANS ARE GODS AND DJS ARE PRIESTS. THEN RECORDS LABELS SIMPLY PUBLISHING THE BIBLES...” Acid Eric, Goa, 1997
 
Twenty five years ago, in early 90-s, when Goa Trance was the music for chosen and DAT tapes were the audio weapons, DJs popularity and level was depending on his own collection of unreleased tracks and connections with musicians. Each track was traced, hunted down and kept really well, because at that time it was impossible to get music otherwise but only in daily long recording sessions. Why it was so hard race? The answer is easy- at that time no one could just go in the shop or online web store and buy or download the music.
 
No record labels were releasing Psychedelic Goa Trance till 1993. The first pure Psychedelic trance label was Dragonfly Records, formed by the artist and trance producer Martin "Youth" Glover in Brixton, London. Raja Ram and Graham Wood first produced here as The Infinity Project. Simon Posfor later released his legendary album, Twisted as Hallucinogen on Dragonfly. First top artists of those times were released on that label-Total Eclipse, Mandra Gora, Man With No Name, Prana, Ayahuasca, Slinky Wizard and Doof.
 
At this point the scene was growing rapidly and many new labels were created. Return To The Source, a party collective first appeared. Raja Ram and Graham Wood went on to found their own label, called TIP Records (now TIP World). Tsuyoshi Suzuki worked with John Perloff to create the Matsuri Productions label. Flying Rhino Records was established by James Monro, Dominic Lamb and George Barker (Slinky Wizard). Simon Berry founded Platipus Records, John Ford opened his Phantasm Records and Paul Oakenfold’s Perfecto Fluoro Records releases were on the top of UK charts. Blue Room Released also used to be one of the most important and unusual labels in the Psychedelic trance genre. Some of the most well-known artists today were signed and had their work distributed on that label. Transient records had peak sales in the middle of 90-s.
 
Israeli first labels Trust in Trance and Phonokol made a massive breakthrough with their local artists and particular music direction, spreading their names around the World- Astral Projection , MFG, Xerox , California Sunshine.
 
The German label Spirit Zone Records opened up in 1994 signing on many foreign artists such as K.U.R.O, Etnica and Har-El Prussky. It was also the home label of many German artists such as Electric Universe, Star Sounds Orchestra and S.U.N. Project.
 
Anyway, looking back in history we can say that it was much easier to feel confident in Trance Sea. Every of this very few label was very known between Trance heads on the planet, had its own reputation, every release was a wanted Hit, and the standards of Psychedelic vibes and quality of music were very high and demanding. Only really good and professional musicians had their own albums, and we can say – That were the times!
 
Coming back in reality of 2014 we can admit that everything has been completely changed. At least 50 labels appeared and disappeared after few releases since 1993. And around hundred and even more present their production on different quality levels. In the end of 90-s when for some reason Psychedelic Goa Trance started its division into subgenres such as Full on, Dark, Progressive, Suomi, Hi Tech, Forest, etc. many labels took their own directions, also internet gave wide possibilities for promotion and establishment in media and we can say figural, the cake is divided now.
 
The only thing is, that inside each piece of cake there is massive presence of different partials- tasty and not. Each subgenre as per our research has at least 20 labels with regular releases, and not all of them deserve your attention. How to identify your Cherry on the top of the Cake?
 
Just read this Sunday Freak edition, where we will present you six best labels of 2014 that you can absolutely trust. We consider them as the leading force of each genre of trance that we call PSYCHEDELIC.
 
Chief Editors.
Friday, 27 June 2014 13:46

News of Goa-Freaks.Com website

Dear readers. As we knew always, Summer is Summer. Lazy times, parties around the World, and as Goa-Freaks.Com administation office is on travelling mode, internet is not always so good. So, as promised, we inform you about the happenings and giving you trippy info Almost Daily.
Today we would like to tell you few things dedicated to our website.

NEW SUNDAY FREAK INTERFACE
First of all, our main media project - Sunday Freak online e-Magazine will be released now in new, advanced electronic mode. It will be published twice a month on Sundays and will have wider content and interactive options to satisfy the hi-tech needs of all hipsters and tripsters who have joined our net.
Free for reading and downloading, Sunday Freak as usually
will introduce you to Psychedelic World, and Psychedelic World to you.
Tomorrow edition will be very special for us. It is a long and responsable collaboration of Goa-freaks.Com with six leading psy trance labels of the planet to represent you the high quality music production you can absolutely trust.
 Choose you Cherry on the top of Psy Cake.

 
JOIN THE NET
As you can see time to time we are modifying the look of the main page, but the main and presentation sectors remain still. We remind you about wide list of the options that you can choose if you want to join our website community, that membership representative from more that 20 countries.
Please pay your special attention if your business concerns psychedelic culture - parties, workshops, labels, clothes production, festival shops, etc. we accept commercial proposals.
All information how to join the website or advertise your company or product - www.goa-freaks.com/joinus

PARTY CALENDAR 
We remind to all psy trance and chillout parties in the World that Goa-Freaks.Com happy to provide you with its free party info service. Our social networking now covers more that 10000 people daily that makes the website one of three top visited info  portals dedicated to psychedelic and trance culture.
To add your event into Party Calendar you will just need to fill ( in maximum ) the form in ADD YOUR EVENT and submit it. Please pay attention that once done, the article editable only through web-admin. After the approval it will be promoted by all our web resources. Just click here : www.parties.goa-freaks.com. 

TRANCE'n'RUSSIA 
Good news for our Russian followers- specially for those who do not read English. Russian trance scene celebrating this year 20-th anniversary of its massive existence. Founded and established in 1994 by one of Goa-Freaks co-founders - X.P.VooDoo it has been developed in its own, subcultural way and new info portal is dedicated to local Russki scene, presenting its Music, Fashion,Art and  Parties. Do not hesitate to check this page if you do not know Slavanic languages- we put for you the Translation button. Na zdorovie!
 
DOWNTEPMO WORLD
Our well planned secret idea to spread our tentacles into the world of slowerbeat psychedelic music. At the beginning it will be a special section in Sunday Freak e-Magazine with a lot of chilly and psybient music to listen, interviews and news from that World and around September after we will establish necassary connection with the main players on that scene
Downtempo World will have its own division on our website.

Check our pilot release : www.goa-freaks.com/magazine/25thedition/down-tempo-world

We will keep you updated with the latest news of Goa-Freaks.Com psychedelic social networking every Saturday. As usual, almost....
 
AND FRESH NEWS FROM SITE COMMUNITY MEMBERS :
Dear friends! Goatika on air!

We are proud to present our new track made this year in Goa!
It called Crazy Tuesday and dedicated to Shiva Valley. 
Sound mix and mastered by Alex Parasense at his magic studio!
Written & arranged by Kliment Dichev / Pavel Goatika. 

Performed by:
Kliment (Bulgaria) - keyboards, synth; 
Jovis (USA) - didge, jews harp; 
Elvis (Goa) - guitar; 
Pavel Goatika (Russia) - rhythm section.

To download this track in best quality:

http://www.goatikapsytrance.bandcamp.com/track/crazy-tuesday

MAKE MUSIC, NOT WAR!

Official page of Goatika Creative Lab on Goa-Freaks.com -

http://goa-freaks.com/djs/goatika-creative-lab
Published in NEWS Archives
Friday, 13 June 2014 05:07

True Story of Goa Trance

After almost 20 years of boring pause in the development of trippy music at the beginning of 70’s, new sounds mixed up with thousands of micrograms and blew up the minds of the people and expanded their consciousness to its maximum level with the digital messages from outer Space. Without leaving for any of us even a little chance to come back into the Matrix. The sound of that music making our hearts beat together and feel that we are all ONE.

THE TRUE STRORY OF GOA TRANCE

Goa Trance is a sub-genre of electronic dance music – EDM which had started to take its form back in 80’s. However, the very first instigators, ideologists and style formers can be found even further in the past, more accurately – during the period of psychedelic rock in the 60’s and 70’s. Considering the name of this style, it’s easy to relate it with the Indian province called Goa, which is located on the western bank of India. The historical and cultural heritage of Goa is known world-wide, for it was a colony that was fought over during many periods in the past. The first conflicts in that region were between Hindu and Muslim population. These conflicts can be tracked to as far as 10th century, and they had continued all the way to the 16th century.


In the year of 1510, Portuguese colonists arrived to Goa. They made a great influence in this Indian province, which can be seen in numerous catholic churches and monasteries that were built during that time.
But, the Portuguese were not the only European nation that controlled Goa in the history. The British colonists occupied the region two times. The first period was from 1797. to 1798. and again from 1802. – 1813. During 1961. Indian army seized control over Goa, and integrated it into the sovereign country of India. Multi-cultural history of Goa has its place in history of Goa Trance genre, especially when we point out the very first parties that were organized on the beaches of Goa during the 60’s.

According to Ray Castle (one of the first DJs in Goa) the first colonists were hippies which were coming to India seeking spirituality. The second important factor which mostly attracted Europeans (and Americans) to this region was that there was no legal limitation to the consuming of hashish.

This was a fact until the mid-70’s when the US government pressed the issue on Indian authorities to ban this practice. Early history of the pioneers of Goa and their first parties was never documented, but according to some witnesses (who were hippies at that time), the first Goa parties were organized in 1968. thanks to eight-finger Eddie who was probably the first modern settler on the beaches of Goa. Together with his friends, he discovered beautiful beaches and got friendly with the local villagers, which gave them a feeling of absolute freedom and happiness, which they had expressed through consuming psychedelic drugs and dancing on the beach

The music at that time did not have any relations to the style of Goa trance, or even with electronic music in general, but the philosophy which they were following is almost the same as the one that Goa trance followers are sharing today. The music that had to do with Goa parties back then was more related to bands like Grateful Dead, The Doors, The Eagles, and Pink Floyd. Fred Disko was one of the first DJs in Goa who started to promote electronic music as well. After all, that decision gave him his “Disko” pseudonym.
Besides Fred Disko, there was earlier mentioned Ray Castle, and Goa Gil, who promoted rock/fusion during the 70’s. Later, in the 80’s, Goa Gil started to promote Goa influenced electronic music too, and he gave it a rather “simple” name: the first post-punk experimental electronic dance music coming from Europe, the neue deutsche welle, electronic body music.

 
Ray Castle explained that the very first form of Goa Trance sound could be recognized with bands/projects like Nitzer Ebb, Front 242, Frontline Assembly. Fred Disko also mentioned the influence of classical-traditional Indian music which was easily recognized in Goa trance sound.
The symbiosis of these rather different influences was inevitable. The reasons of that symbiosis become very clear, especially when you imagine 10 tablas, 6 sitars and an Indian female vocalist performing a song in the repetitive way, so that you can actually feel like flying.
Fred Disko and Ray Cole said that the contemporary “scene” in Goa was formed from a handful of DJs who were mostly people from France, Italy, Germany, Netherlands and Switzerland.
 
The main goal was to exchange and collect the music which was brought from Europe. They were all trying to obtain hard-to-get rare music as much as they could. They also wanted to have rarities which sounded more psychedelic.
These quests were labelled as “The quest for weird psychedelic music”. The great part of their inspiration was hidden within the consummation of LSD, the drug which became a symbol of Goa parties, especially because it was easy to get, and mostly free of charge. It was known as “free acid punch”
 
DJs of the late 80’s had often used DATs for their DJ sets, but the preparations for the show were hard and time-consuming. According to Steve Psyko (he was also one of the first Goa DJs), the DJs would often cut-out the parts of the songs mixing them with other tracks, in order to create a mega-mix which would be played at the parties later on.
 
The use of vinyl records was not practiced because of the risk that the vinyl could actually melt due to high temperatures. Ray Castle recalls one time when DJ Sven Vath came to Goa with all his records, in order to become “Techno pope of India”. However, that didn’t work out well, because you just have to be used to DATs on such high temperatures.

Paul Chambers (British Goa trance DJ) recalls his trips to Goa and the very first electronic music parties that were held there. There were no more than 200 people on those events. The decorations were really colourful but not numerous and there were a few black-light lamps around. The first police raids occurred during the 1990. but the situation became better in 1991. and 1992.  It was during these years, that the first hype and rush to Goa had started.
 
The number of people on parties noticeably increased, and the numbers were from 500 to 1500 visitors. More and more people were coming to Goa, especially from Israel and Japan. With the increasing number of tourists that arrived to Goa to dance, consume drugs and live a free life, the whole underground feeling started to fade, and the music itself started to become more and more popular.
This was even more supported by numerous English and other European DJs and publishers, which resulted in first releases in the 1993. 
The release which was probably the most influential for Goa trance uprising was the Project II Trance, released by Dragonfly Records. This release featured artists like Gumbo, Genetic, The Infinity Project, Total Eclipse, Mandra Gora and others.

Except for Goa trance in India, parties started to occur in other parts of the world, and the most known ones were in Byron Bay (Australia), where many hippies found their new place for Goa trance, since more and more tourists were visiting Goa and the scene was booming. In England, the first Goa trance parties were organized in London and Manchester. It was interesting that almost the very same DJs performed in Goa and in England, and the visitors were mostly the same in the both areas. It was just a matter of season where the caravan will be settled.


 


 

The music in that period (1993-1999) was characterized as psychedelic trance-dance. That term was mentioned even earlier and it was often used as a title for parties. The tracks became longer than earlier, so the average track was around 8.30 minutes, and the tempo was around 145 BPM (beats per minute). Generally, the BPM range can vary from 120 to 160. The structure of tracks mostly had the same pattern, so almost every track had an atmospheric intro, 4/4 rhythm which was followed by oriental and eastern melodies, acid sounds (the legendary TB303) and vocal samples (mostly taken from SF movies

The climax of the track would usually emerge around 5th minute, although some tracks didn’t follow that pattern. Iconography on parties, CD covers and T-shirts was mostly related to Hindu and Buddhist motifs.
 
There were also science-fiction motives (mostly aliens, UFOs and other characters), colourful psychedelic fractals and drawings.
The end of Goa trance music occurred in the period between 1998./1999  with the newly formed psy trance sound which was rather minimalistic comparing to Goa trance, containing less melodies, shorter bass lines and sharper kicks with emphasis on psychedelic sound effects. Many Goa trance projects started to fade, while others formed within the psytrance genre.
 
Although, some other projects kept their former names while they adjusted their production to the present trend.
 
One of such examples is a legendary Goa trance project – Etnica. Many publishers also followed the change, and one of the biggest trance labels, TIP records was renamed to TIP World. TIP Records used to publish Goa trance (The Infinity Project, Doof, Psychopod...) while TIP World started to publish new projects like GMS, Logic Bomb, 1200 Mics, and others.
 


After Goa trance found its place in electronic music scene, many new artists, publishers and DJs had emerged. It would take a lot of time to mention all of the names which took part in the scene during the six golden years of Goa trance (1993-1999). Because of that, we will mention only some of them:

RECORD LABELS :

Dragonfly
Perfecto Fluoro
Flying Rhino
Blue Room Released
Matsuri Productions
TIP Records
Symbiosis
Krembo
BooM
Platipus
RETURN TO THE SOURCE
PSYCHIC DELI
Phantasm
Transient
PHONOKOL

Friday, 11 April 2014 09:28

the Yellow House School

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Published in NEWS Archives
Friday, 28 February 2014 10:44

Page 6: FreakHero - Cleo Odzer

Cleo Odzer (Sheila Lynne Odzer, 6 April 1950 – 26 March 2001) was an American writer, author of books on prostitution in Thailand, the hippie culture of Goa, and cybersex.
 
She grew up in a wealthy Jewish family in Manhattan, New York City and attended Franklin School (now Dwight School) and Quintano’s School for Young Professionals, graduating from the latter in 1968. At about that time, she began writing about the music scene for a small Greenwich Village newspaper. She met Keith Emerson, then member of the rock band The Nice and later of Emerson, Lake & Palmer, at The Scene nightclub and they were briefly engaged. According to Odzer, Emerson broke off the engagement when he saw a February 1969 Time Magazine article that published her photo and described her as a "Super Groupie." Shortly thereafter in 1969 she recorded an album called The Groupies, produced by Alan Lorber, which essentially consisted of interviews with Cleo and some friends describing their adventures meeting (and sleeping with) rock musicians.
 
Hippie years in Goa
In the early 1970s, Odzer traveled in Europe and the Middle East and worked as a model. She spent the late 1970s in the hippie culture of Anjuna, Goa in India. Her experiences there, including heavy use of cocaine and heroin, the international drug smuggling used to finance the stay, and her subsequent two-week incarceration, would later form the basis of her second book, Goa Freaks: My Hippie Years in India (1995). For a time she followed the teachings of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh in India.
 
Return to U.S.; research in Thailand
After her return to the United States in the late 1970s, Odzer underwent drug treatment at Daytop in New York. She entered college, then graduate school, and in 1990 obtained a Ph.D. in anthropology from The New School for Social Research in New York City with a thesis on prostitution in Thailand. Beginning in 1987, she had spent three years in Thailand to research this topic. In her dissertation, she describes case studies of 17 people connected to the sex industry in Patpong. She concludes that the economic opportunities provided by sex work do not translate into a higher status of women, because of persistent stigma and ideas about gender inequality in Thai society. Her experiences in Thailand were described in her first book, Patpong Sisters: An American Woman's View of the Bangkok Sex World . In this work she describes the Thai prostitutes she got to know as quick-witted entrepreneurs rather than exploited victims, sometimes revered in their poor home villages. She also relates her own problematic affair with a Thai pimp boyfriend.
Following publication of the book, Odzer worked at Daytop in New York, the drug rehabilitation organization she herself had attended earlier.
From 1995 to 1998, Odzer produced several dozen episodes of her show Cleo's Adventures for Manhattan Neighborhood Network Public-access television. Her third book, Virtual Spaces: sex and the cyber citizen (1997), deals with cybersex. She appeared in episode 1.21 of SexTV in 1999, with a segment on cybersex.
 
Return to Goa and death.
Disappointed with life in New York, in 1999 Odzer returned to Goa, where some of the remaining old-time hippies disliked her because of the publicity her book had brought to the scene.She died there in 2001. A good friend of hers who had been corresponding with Odzer during her final stay in India, "Cookie" (with whom she recorded The Groupies), reports that Odzer's doctor (who had been away when she died) said she probably died of a stroke related to very high cholesterol and serious circulatory problems that she was being treated for during her final year, and that her body had been cremated after a small service. But a researcher, Arun Saldanha, who interviewed members of the Goa community about Odzer, reports being told by a psychiatrist at the Goa Medical College some ten months after her death that her body had lain unclaimed in a morgue in Mapusa for more than a month until finally she had been buried in Mapusa without a funeral, and that she had had AIDS.
The 2002 documentary Last Hippie Standing by Marcus Robbin covered the Goa scene and featured some of Cleo Odzer's old super-8 footage from the 1970s. She was interviewed by Robbins for the film in Goa shortly before her death, and said:
“I don't know what the future brings, but I know what I don't want: New York is what I don't want, that culture is what I don't want; it's not right. I don't know what is right. I don't think our old life was right. I don't see a new culture that is right, but we have to continue trying, that's the best we can do, that's the best any of us can do, to keep trying. To make something that is peaceful for everybody, that makes people happy, that is fair to everybody. And that's all I want.”
The film was dedicated to her memory.
 
GOA FREAKS- MY HIPPY LIFE IN INDIA (1976):
In this lively and unique document of 1970s-style hedonism, we follow the futher adventures of Cleo Odzer, whose first book Patpong Sisters was a best seller. Goa Freaks begins in the mid 1970s and tells of Cleo's love affair with Goa, a resort in India where the Freaks (hippies) of the world converge to partake in a heady bohemian lifestyle. To finance their astounding appetites for cocaine, heroin, and hashish, the Freaks spend each monsoon season acting as drug couriers, and soon Cleo is running her own "scams" in Canada, Australis, and the United States. (She even gets her Aunt Sadie in on the action.) Wish her earnings she builds a veritable palace on the beach- the only Goa house with running water and a flushing toilet. Cleo becomes the hostess of Anjuna Beach, holding days-long poker games and movie nights and, as her money begins to run out, transforming the house into a for-profit drug den. Tracing Cleo's love affairs, her stint hiding out at the ashram of the infamous Bhagwan Rajneesh, and her sometimes-harrowing drug experiences, Goa Freaks: My Hippie Years in India is candid and compelling, bringing to life the spirit of a now-lost era.
Friday, 21 February 2014 08:09

Page 2: Interviews - Hampi Report

As you know, we have send a team of Goa-Freaks.Com in Karnataka to make a special report that will help freaks to find easy way to succeed a HAMPI TRIP and bring back in Goa fantastic memories and open mind.
 
After their return, we were trying to meet our spaced out reporters, Sterling and Ramaram to make a ideo interview with them about their trip, but as we understood this trip was not finished yet for both of them. So, we decided just to record and write down their story and that is a written and edited version of their mumbling:
 
"Ok, so after more than ten years of Hampi travelling experience this time we were especially attentive to that very little aspects that compose a situation that we are calling perfect psychedelic getaway and that also expand your consciousness in many different ways. I will try to give a few useful freaks advices, and I guarantee that if you follow our path - your expressions will be maximum positive and the journey absolute comfortable.
Let’s start.
 
1. WAY TO HAMPI.
Few options:
* Sleeper bus from Mapusa - 9 hours. Cheap way, but quite dodgy conditions.
* Your bike. Possible if it is good one, better Enfield- some parts of the roads are much damaged.
* Taxi. The best for the group of 4-6 people - just take a Jeep. The optimal price from Anjuna is 7000- 8000 Rupees one way, which makes 3000-4000 for one person to go and come back. Nothing actually, compared what you will get for that money
* Private car. If you do not have one- rent a good one, so your trip will be much more fast and comfortable. This is my recommended option for 2-4 people.
 
The road by bike/car will take around 7-9 hours depends on the traffic. If you will choose Saturday/Sunday - you will reach Hampi easier. Anyway,
 
better to take a Highway Panaji-Ponda, the asphalt is pretty good, the only part you will have to be attentive starts right after the border with Karnataka and bump you for 10 kilometres. After that - NR4A till Hubli, follow directions to Hospet and ask anyone* for Hampi
 
(* There are not many indications on all the roads. And you do not want to make a roundabout. So you can ask locals in easy English the correct way. But! Here is the trick. Never! Never ask one person and trust him. Always ask one more. And if their directions will be the same- go without doubt. Ah, I forgot.. Its 21st century now, so the easiest way - just to connect your 3G smartphone to Google maps or use the GPS)
 
2. WANT A BREAK?
This time our gang found a super option to divide our drive on two parts and to make a few hours break. We discovered a magic trippy backwater lake - Supa Dam Reservoir. It is just in the middle of the way - 3,5 hours from Goa. While you are in Karnataka already, after the serpentine, turn right in Ramnagar. Drive 30 kilometres, pass Ganeshgudi ( by the way there is fantastic rafting river and birds sanctuary around this village). Go bit further and turn right to the lake. Stop on the dumb, go down and enjoy the cleanest sweet water you can find in India. Deep, fresh and safe. Spectacular surroundings and very hallucinated situation. From that spot there is also a road to Hampi- not the best, but it exists.
 
3. HAMPI HAMPI.
Important is to be in the village before 6pm. After that the boat service that taking you on the other side of the river is closed and you have to stuck in old Hampi. Beautiful seven centuries back, but quite ugly as the place to stay.* your last destination is exactly the other side- which is completely different planet and the place you will have the TRIP OF YOUR LIFE. So, take a boat, after the crossing take a rickshaw and go straight to MOWGLI GUEST HOUSE**. Now, attention: If you visit Hampi with the group of the friends to go together in other dimensions - take the room No 35 (and 34 if you are more than two). Amazing view on river's spate and rice fields surrounded by palms with additional bonus - frogs night concerts.
If you have more romantic situations, I recommend you super sweet room No 31. Spectacular view as well, but you also get lovely quiet veranda with moon view and crickets crackling melodies. You will never regret***

 
( * For us the worse was the poor food options- only veg, spicy Indian food. Dosa and idly for breakfast, Rice and dal for lunch and Aloo Paratha for the dinner. Brrr. But on other side of the river choice is wider and better, so we survived in the end.
** There are few other OK places to stay -
Goa Corner - Good point- cheap. Bad- full of Israeli kids always making balagan and drumming all night long.
Shanti . Good point - nice rooms. Bad point- ugly surroundings- houses and walls.
Laughing Buddha. Good point- I don't know. Bad point- strange attitude of the stuff
*** Important notice. If you plan your trip before, you better make a call in Mowgli to book your room at least a week before. Tell that you saw the information on Goa-Freaks.Com and you will get the special discount.+919448003606. Shrinivas.)
 
 
SPIRITUAL HAMPI.
Hampi temples and ruins are simply amazing. You need to start your spiritual journey early - around 9am- later is getting really hot and the main temple is getting closed after 12am.
Visit it at first, and then take any rickshaw. For 600 Rupees he will take you all around, wait, show you the cultural heritage in the best way with explanations, stories and local jokes. All the round should not take you more than four hours. Please take a camera, bottle of water and smoke if you need- there are some very particular panoramic spots to seat and roll. If you check all the magazine, you will see the whole guide through the ruins. But we specially did not mention there one particular sunset spot- Hanuman temple. On the hill of 120 Meters high, after you will almost die on the 1000th step for the last 1000 years standing the most powerful temple of Monkey God in South India. Panoramic view from the top is simply breath taking. Try to be there one hour before the sunset, and you will never forget this moment in your entire life. I promise you.
 

 
TRIPPING HAMPI.
The side where you stay (Across the river) is full of natural surprising beauties in all the ways possible. Unique landscape making you feel yourself on the other planet. (For sure not in Goa:). Huge lake with super clean water for day tripping and swimming*. And spectacular rice fields surrounded by chaotic hills and stones, palm groves, weird plants and absolutely relaxed vibe**. What can be better for us to spend at least one day in some other dimensions. So, we opened our magic box full of different options....and ...listen...I have seen visuals in my life! But what we experienced after few hours of climbing on breathing stones, roaming around all this trippy paths, feeling real power of Shiva and watch the most monumental sunset of our lives with the sound of mantras from the temple..it is not possible to explain. Just think about this and maybe one of the next days you will find yourself between the moving stones that are glittering and talking to you in multidimensional magical world of great Hampi.
 
 
(* Do not believe "Dangerous, crocodiles" writing. Nothing inside the water. Super advice - take a round boat trip. Small round boats can take up to 3 people. Amazing, really, especially if you are high.
** We are talking about the hallucinate walk through the path behind Goa Corner resort in the rice fields area. Wow! Also you can take a pass over a hill near this resort and you will come to the other side- other view, other surprises-caves, strange trees, etc. )
Uff…can we smoke one now? And a glass of water, please..Thank you.”
 

All photos in this magazine were done by Goa-Freaks.Com. Please add a link if you repost them.
Full gallery you can watch HERE:
 
 
Friday, 21 February 2014 08:09

Page 3: Freakstories - Mythology of Hampi

The legends, myths, mysteries from Hippies till nowadays will be published here to introduce you the history of establishment of World's Psychedelic Culture:
 
 
A brief understanding of these aspects of Hampi goes a long way to help you make sense of what you are actually going to see and experience once you reach Hampi. Long nights near the fire that stories were passed from the fathers to sons, from the mothers to their daughters, generation after generation the legends kept their origin.
We also spend some time near the fire and listened in few of them, wrote them down and telling them to you:
 
MYTHOLOGY OF HAMPI
Hampi has a mythical aura surrounding its environments. You would notice something spooky the moment you set foot on Hampi. In any case this is believed to be the mythical monkey kingdom, Kishkinda. It is believed that many of the evens mentioned in various Hindu sacred texts of the Hindus had happened in and around Hampi. The Hindu mythology together with a plethora of local folklores makes the script of Hampi interesting.
 
HEMAKUTA HILL
The name Hampi is evolved from Pampa, the ancient name of the river Tungabhadra. Also Pampa is the daughter of Bhramha, the Creator God. She was a devoted worshiper of Shiva, the God of Destruction. Impressed by her dedication Shiva offered her a boon and she opted to marry him. The place thus came to be known as Pampakshetra (land of Pampa) and Shiva as Pampapathi (consort of Pampa). The Hemakuta Hill in Hampi is the place, according to the myth, Shiva did his penance before marrying Pampa. Kama , the God of Love, felt sympathy for Pampa for her love towards Shiva. He disturbed Shiva from his deep meditation. That attracted Shiva’s wrath. Known for his anger, Shiva burned Kama with his third (fiery) eye. Rathi, Goddess of Passion and also Kama’s consort pleaded for mercy with Shiva. Shiva grants Kama’s life back, but only as a character and not as a physical being.
On Shiva’s marriage with Pampa Gods from the heaven showered gold on the place. This hill in Hampi is called Hemakuta, literally means heap of gold.
All these places have immense religious significance for the Hindus in south India, especially the devotees of Lord Shiva. In the beginning Pampa was a local folk deity. Through the concept of a marriage with Shiva, goddess Pampa is associated into the pantheon of the Hindu gods.
The places mentioned here has a continuous religious history ever since known timeframe. It just happened that the Vijayanagara Empire came in-between and gone as an episode in Hampi’s long history. Even today the annual ceremonial marriage festival & the betrothal are important festivals in Hampi. With time, Shiva became more popular here as Virupaksha. Virupaksha, an incarnation of Shiva, literally means the one with oblique eye. This refers to the fact that Shiva has three eyes. The third fire eye on his forehead opens when he do the destruction.
 
 
RAMAYANA IN HAMPI
Ramayana , literally means the story of Rama , is one of the sacred texts of the Hindus. According to various estimates, the epic poem was first composed during 500 BCE and 100 BCE. Ramayana is told in 7 cantos (kandas) and tells to story of Rama, Sita and the demon king Ravana of Lanka who abducted Sita to Lanka. The central theme and moral of Ramaya is the victory of good 

over the evil. The main character, Rama is attributed as one of the ten incarnations of Lord Vishnu. Interesting in this incarnation, Rama is portrayed with humanly values and weakness rather than the godlike supernatural powers.
Rama and Lakshmana , reaches Hampi in search of his lost wife Sita. Hanuman, the general of the monkey king Sugreeva mistook them for spies from the rebel kin of Sugreeva. On hearing their story Hanuman brings them to Sugreeva. He eventually takes them to a cave and shown them a set of jewels. Rama recognizes them as that of his wife Sita. Sugreeva explains them that Sita dropped them at this site when the demon king Ravana (of Lanka) abducted her on his flying chariot. Later Rama kills Vali, the rebellious brother of Sugreeva, and installs Sugreeva as the undisputed king of the monkey kingdom. Hanuman offers for help to fly to Lanka. He returns with the news that Sita was indeed in the custody of Ravana. Hanuman offers Rama the help of his monkey army to make a bridge across and attack Lanka. Rain plays the spoil spot and the plan gets postponed till the rains are over. Rama and Lakshmana takes refuge during the rainy season at a nearby Malyavanta Hill. The epic goes on till saving Sita from Lanka and further.
What signify are the locations narrated in the epic. The place is treated sacred since it born the footprint of Rama, one of the ten incarnations of Lord Vishnu. Hanuman , who is a loyal follower of Rama is iconic of devotion and valor. Probably Hampi has much more icons of Hanuman than any other gods. Rishimukha Hills where Hanuman met Rama & Lakshmana is a hermitage. The cave where Sugreeva supposedly hide the fallen jewels is on the way to Vittala temple via the riverside ruins.
 
ORIGIN OF HAMPI BOULDERS:
Those finally end up in Hampi invariably wonder how on earth such a landscape got created! Well, you have two choices to find a solace: one in geology and the other in mythology.
The geologists’s version first: The Hampi’s boulder strewn landscape is one of the oldest exposed surfaces on earth. Unlike most of the mountain ranges, the boulder heaps of Hampi were not formed as a result of volcanisms or of any uplift in the earth’s crust. The boulders were once part of gigantic granite monoliths (massive mountain of rock). Tens of millions (some even put it as a few billions) of years of erosion thanks to the natural forces (sun, storm, wind etc) made the surface of the monoliths crack, split and eventually metamorphed in to its present forms. The pieces that lost balance in the process crumbled and formed the boulder heaps. The ones managed to balance somehow remained in some quasi-stable state, puzzling the spectators. Children (and also curious among grownups) who visit Hampi often ask, How did they manage to stack up such giant boulders one over the other!?  The answer is simple. Nature played the role of a sculpturer. It scooped out the unwanted portion out of those giant granite monoliths, making it look as if someone had stacked the boulders with precision.
 
 
Hampi is believed to be the erstwhile mythical monkey kingdom. And there was a bitter power struggle going on between the princely brothers, Sugreeva and Vali. In a pitched battle Vali defeats Sugreeva and chases him out of the kingdom. The frightened Sugreeva took refuge at the Matanga hill (the tallest hill in Hampi ) as Vali can’t climb it thanks to an earlier curse on him. Rama , the king of Ayodhiya , reaches Kishkinda in search for his abducted wife, Sita. Hanuman, the monkey general finds Sita in Lanka (Sri Lanka) in custody of the demon king Ravana. Vali offers help of his monkey army to attack Lanka and free Sita. In return Rama helps him to kill Vali and regain the throne of the monkey kingdom.  The battle between Vali and Sugreeva was so intense that the boulders threw at each other piled up all around Hampi. In another version of the story, the monkey army piled up the boulders here to build a bridge to Lanka. That helped the monkey army to march to Lanka.
Rishikukh Hill, a popular spot among the boulderers as ‘Hampi Island’ is believed to be the place where Hanuman first met Rama and his brother Lakshmana. According to the myths the place south of Rishimukh (across the river) is the place where Rama crowned Sugreeva, after killing Vali. A temple called Kodanda Rama Temple stands at this place. The Anjaneya Hill, with the characteristic whitewashed zigzag stairs to the hilltop is believed to be the birthplace of Hanuman.
Friday, 21 February 2014 08:09

Page 4: Freakscience - Vijayanagara Empire

History is a very important part of any, even freakscience. The difference between normal and ours is obvious. Freaks are lazy. So instead of spending our time to film a  movie, put the subtitles, edit it we simply upload a video lectorium for Indian primary school.
Check it out, know more, expand your consciousness!

 

This is a special area of top secret information from the Past, Present and Future of Goa Freaks World.
 
 
To fulfil this section with  section, we decided to ask our to make a deep search and  prepare an archaeological and historical report about the biggest and the most powerful empires of ancient India, that founded the Hampi and established there the highest level of culture, literature, architecture and spiritualism in early 14the Century.
 
VIJAYANAGARA  EMPIRE

 The Vijayanagara Empire (also called Karnata Empire), referred to as the Kingdom of Bisnagar by the Portuguese, was an empire based in South India, in the Deccan Plateau region. It was established in 1336 by Harihara I and his brother Bukka Raya I of Sangama Dynasty.  The empire rose to prominence as a culmination of attempts by the southern powers to ward off Islamic invasions by the end of the 13th century. It lasted until 1646 although its power declined after a major military defeat in 1565 by the Deccan sultanates. The empire is named after its capital city of Vijayanagara, whose ruins surround present day Hampi, now a World Heritage Site in Karnataka, India. The writings of medieval European travelers such as Domingo Paes, Fernão Nunes and Niccolò Da Conti, and the literature in local languages provide crucial information about its history. Archaeological excavations at Vijayanagara have revealed the empire's power and wealth.
The empire's legacy includes many monuments spread over South India, the best known of which is the group at Hampi. The previous temple building traditions in South India came together in the Vijayanagara Architecture style. The mingling of all faiths and vernaculars inspired architectural innovation of Hindu temple construction, first in the Deccan and later in the Dravidian idioms using the local granite. Efficient administration and vigorous overseas trade brought new technologies such as water management systems for irrigation. The empire's patronage enabled fine arts and literature to reach new heights in Kannada, Telugu, Tamil and Sanskrit, while Carnatic music evolved into its current form. The Vijayanagara Empire created an epoch in South Indian history that transcended regionalism by promoting Hinduism as a unifying factor.
Differing theories have been proposed regarding the Vijayanagara empire's origins. Many historians propose Harihara I and Bukka, the founders of the empire, were Kannadigas and commanders in the army of the Hoysala Empire stationed in the Tungabhadra region to ward off Muslim invasions from the Northern India. Others claim that they were Telugu people first associated with the Kakatiya Kingdom who took control of the northern parts of the Hoysala Empire during its decline. Irrespective of their origin, historians agree the founders were supported and inspired by Vidyaranya, a saint at the Sringeri monastery to fight the Muslim invasion of South India. Writings by foreign travellers during the late medieval era combined with recent excavations in the Vijayanagara principality have uncovered much-needed information about the empire's history, fortifications, scientific developments and architectural innovations.
Before the early 14th-century rise of the Vijayanagara Empire, the Hindu states of the Deccan, the Yadava Empire of Devagiri, the Kakatiya dynasty of Warangal, the Pandyan Empire of Madurai, and the tiny kingdom of Kampili had been repeatedly invaded by Muslims from the north, and by 1336 they had all been defeated by Alla-ud-din Khilji and Muhammad bin Tughluq, the Sultans of Delhi. The Hoysala Empire was the sole remaining Hindu state in the path of the Muslim invasion. After the death of Hoysala king Veera Ballala III during a battle against the Sultan of Madurai in 1343, the Hoysala Empire merged with the growing Vijayanagara empire.
In the first two decades after the founding of the empire, Harihara I gained control over most of the area south of the Tungabhadra river and earned the title of Purvapaschima Samudradhishavara ("master of the eastern and western seas"). By 1374 Bukka Raya I, successor to Harihara I, had defeated the chiefdom of Arcot, the Reddys of Kondavidu, the Sultan of Madurai and gained control over Goa in the west and the Tungabhadra-Krishna River doab in the north. The original capital was in the principality of Anegondi on the northern banks of the Tungabhadra River in today's Karnataka. It was later moved to nearby Vijayanagara on the river's southern banks during the reign of Bukka Raya I.
 
With the Vijayanagara Kingdom now imperial in stature, Harihara II, the second son of Bukka Raya I, further consolidated the kingdom beyond the Krishna River and brought the whole of South India under the Vijayanagara umbrella.  The next ruler, Deva Raya I, emerged successful against the Gajapatis of Odisha and undertook important works of fortification and irrigation. Deva Raya II (called Gajabetekara) succeeded to the throne in 1424 and was possibly the most capable of the Sangama dynasty rulers.  He quelled rebelling feudal lords as well as the Zamorin of Calicut and Quilon in the south. He invaded the island of Lanka and became overlord of the kings of Burma at Pegu and Tanasserim. The empire declined in the late 15th century until the serious attempts by commander Saluva Narasimha Deva Raya in 1485 and by general Tuluva Narasa Nayaka in 1491 to reconsolidate the empire.
After nearly two decades of conflict with rebellious chieftains, the empire eventually came under the rule of Krishna Deva Raya, the son of Tuluva Narasa Nayaka. In the following decades the Vijayanagara empire dominated all of Southern India and fought off invasions from the five established Deccan Sultanates. The empire reached its peak during the rule of Krishna Deva Raya when Vijayanagara armies were consistently victorious. The empire annexed areas formerly under the Sultanates in the northern Deccan and the territories in the eastern Deccan, including Kalinga, while simultaneously maintaining control over all its subordinates in the south.  Many important monuments were either completed or commissioned during the time of Krishna Deva Raya.           Krishna Deva Raya was followed by his younger half-brother Achyuta Deva Raya in 1529. When Achyuta Deva Raya died in 1542, Sadashiva Raya, the teenage nephew of Achyuta Raya was appointed king though real power was wielded by Rama Raya, Krishna Deva Raya's son-in-law. When Sadashiva was old enough to claim absolute power, Aliya Rama Raya had him imprisoned and became the de-facto ruler.  Eager to take advantage of the disunity among the Sultanates of Bijapur, Ahamednagar, Berar, Golkonda, and Bidar, Rama Raya involved himself in the political affairs of the powers across the Krishna river to the north. His ploy of supporting militarily one Sultanate against another, often changing alliances, brought rich rewards for a while. However, by 1563, exhausted with his intrigues, the bitter rivals from the north formed an alliance. They marched against Rama Raya and clashed with the Vijayanagara's forces in January 1565.
The capture and killing of Aliya Rama Raya in the famous Battle of Talikota, after a seemingly easy victory for the Vijayanagara armies, created havoc and confusion in the Vijayanagara ranks, which were then completely routed. The Sultanates' army later plundered Hampi and reduced it to the ruinous state in which it remains; it was never re-occupied. Tirumala Deva Raya, Rama Raya's younger brother who was the sole surviving commander, left Vijayanagara for Penukonda with vast amounts of treasure on the back of 1500 elephants.
The empire went into a slow decline regionally, although trade with the Portuguese continued, and the British were given a land grant for the establishment of Madras. Tirumala Deva Raya was succeeded by his son Sriranga I later followed by Venkata II who was the last king of Vijayanagara empire, made his capital Chandragiri and Vellore, repulsed the invasion of the Deccan Sultanates and saved Penukonda from being captured.
His successor Rama Deva Raya took power and ruled until 1632, after whose death Venkata III became king and ruled for about ten years. The empire was finally conquered by the Sultanates of Bijapur and Golkonda.  The largest feudatories of the Vijayanagar empire – the Mysore Kingdom, Keladi Nayaka, Nayaks of Madurai, Nayaks of Tanjore, Nayakas of Chitradurga and Nayak Kingdom of Gingee declared independence and went on to have a significant impact on the history of South India in the coming centuries. These Nayaka kingdoms lasted into the 18th century while the Mysore Kingdom remained a princely state until Indian Independence in 1947 although they came under the British Raj in 1799 after the death of Tipu Sultan. 
VIJAYANAGARA  ARCHITECTURE:
Vijayanagara architecture is a vibrant combination of the Chalukyan, Hoysalan, Pandyan and Cholan styles, idioms that prospered in previous centuries.  Its legacy of sculpture, architecture and painting influenced the development of the arts long after the empire came to an end. Its stylistic hallmark is the ornate pillared Kalyanamantapa (marriage hall), Vasanthamantapa (open pillared halls) and the Rayagopura (tower). Artisans used the locally available hard granite because of its durability since the kingdom was under constant threat of invasion. While the empire's monuments are spread over the whole of Southern India, nothing surpasses the vast open air theatre of monuments at its capital at Vijayanagara, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
In the 14th century the kings continued to build vesara or Deccan-style monuments but later incorporated Dravida-style gopurams to meet their ritualistic needs. The Prasanna Virupaksha temple (underground temple) of Bukka and the Hazare Rama temple of Deva Raya are examples of Deccan architecture. The varied and intricate ornamentation of the pillars is a mark of their work.   
At Hampi, though the Vitthala temple is the best example of their pillared Kalyanamantapa style, the Hazara Ramaswamy temple is a modest but perfectly finished example.  A visible aspect of their style is their return to the simplistic and serene art developed by the Chalukya dynasty.                                
A grand specimen of Vijayanagara art, the Vitthala temple, took several decades to complete during the reign of the Tuluva kings.
Another element of the Vijayanagara style is the carving and consecration of large monoliths such as the Sasivekalu (mustard) Ganesha and Kadalekalu (ground nut) Ganesha at Hampi, the Gommateshvara (Bahubali) monoliths in Karkala and Venur, and the Nandi bull in Lepakshi. The Vijayanagara temples of Kolar, Kanakagiri, Shringeri and other towns of Karnataka; the temples of Tadpatri, Lepakshi, Ahobilam, Tirumala Venkateswara Temple and Srikalahasti in Andhra Pradesh; and the temples of Vellore, Kumbakonam, Kanchi and Srirangam in Tamil Nadu are examples of this style. Vijayanagara art includes wall-paintings such as the Dashavatara and Girijakalyana (marriage of Parvati, Shiva's consort) in the Virupaksha Temple at Hampi, the Shivapurana murals (tales of Shiva) at the Virabhadra temple at Lepakshi, and those at the Kamaakshi and Varadaraja temples at Kanchi. This mingling of the South Indian styles resulted in a richness not seen in earlier centuries, a focus on reliefs in addition to sculpture that surpasses that previously in India.
An aspect of Vijayanagara architecture that shows the cosmopolitanism of the great city is the presence of many secular structures bearing Islamic features. While political history concentrates on the ongoing conflict between the Vijayanagara Empire and the Deccan Sultanates, the architectural record reflects a more creative interaction. There are many arches, domes and vaults that show these influences. The concentration of structures like pavilions, stables and towers suggests they were for use by royalty. The decorative details of these structures may have been absorbed into Vijayanagara architecture during the early 15th century, coinciding with the rule of Deva Raya I and Deva Raya II. These kings are known to have employed many Muslims in their army and court, some of whom may have been Muslim architects. This harmonious exchange of architectural ideas must have happened during rare periods of peace between the Hindu and Muslim kingdoms.                  
The "Great Platform" (Mahanavami dibba) has relief carvings in which the figures seem to have the facial features of central Asian Turks who were known to have been employed as royal attendants.

Friday, 21 February 2014 08:09

Page 6: FreakSpirit

Your first day in Hampi we would suggest to offer to the spiritual/religious/historical/photo tour. All in one – and it will take you 5-6 hours to complete the trip. We recommend you to hire rickshaw driver on the main parking and for 600 Rupees ( after barging) he will bring you around all the temples and archaeological sites, will explain you shortly the history of the places , and wait you as much as it will take.
 
THE MONUMENTS, TEMPLES AND RUINS OF HAMPI
The monuments of Vijayanagara city, also known as Vidyanagara in honour of the sage Vidyaranya were built between AD 1336-1570, from the times of Harihara-I to Sadasiva Raya. A large number of royal buildings were raised by Krishnadeva Raya (AD 1509-30), the greatest ruler of the dynasty. The period witnessed resurgence of Hindu religion, art, architecture in an unprecedented scale. The contemporary chroniclers who came from far off countries-such as Arabia, Italy, Portugal and Russia visited the empire, have left graphic and glowing accounts of the city. It covers an area of nearly 26 sq km and is stated to be enclosed by seven lines of fortifications.
 
Extensive remains of the palaces can be seen within innermost enclosure of the ancient Vijayanagara. The various religious and secular structures which include Hindu and Jaina temples, audience hall of the king, the magnificent throne platform to witness the festivals and other events, the king's balance (tulabhara) are awe-inspiring.
Temples of this city are noted for their large dimensions, florid ornamentation, bold and delicate carvings, stately pillars, magnificent pavilions and a great wealth of iconographic and traditional depictions which include subjects from the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. The largest extant temple is that of Pampapati (now in worship) was extensively renovated. Its magnificent entrance tower was caused by Krishnadeva Raya. The Vitthala temple is an excellent example of Vijayanagara style. The monolithic statues of Lakshmi, Narasimha and Ganesa are noted for their massiveness and grace.
 
The Krishna temple, Pattabhirama temple, Hazara Ramachandra and Chandrasekhara temple as also the Jaina temples, are other examples. Majority of these temples were provided with widespread bazaars flanked on either side by storeyed mandapas. Among secular edifices mention may be made of the Zenana enclosure wherein a massive stone basement of the Queen's palace and an ornate pavilion called 'Lotus-Mahal are only remnants of a luxurious antahpura. The corner towers of arresting elevation, the Dhananayaka's enclosure (treasury), the Mahanavami Dibba carrying beautifully sculptured panels, a variety of ponds and tanks, mandapas, the elephant's stables and the row of pillared mandapas are some of the important architectural remains of this city.
 
 
Recent excavations at the site have brought to light a large number of palatial complexes and basements of several platforms. Interesting finds include a large number of stone images, both in round and relief, beautiful terracotta objects and stucco figures that once embellished the palaces. In addition many gold and copper coins, household utensils, a square stepped-tank (sarovara) at the south-west of Mahanavami Dibba, and a large number of ceramics including the important variety of porcelain and inscribed Buddhist sculptures of 2nd -3rd century AD have also been unearthed.
 
This is a list of the places you must visit ( in alphabetic order):
Achyutaraya Temple/Tiruvengalanatha Temple:
Badava Linga
Chandramauleshwar Temple
Malyavanta Raghunathaswamy temple was constructed in the anicent style of architecture, the temple of Malyavanta Raghunathaswamy stands three km down the road. Its inner walls flaunt peculiar and interesting motifs of fish and marine creatures.
Hazara Rama Temple Complex: This ruined temple complex is well known for elaborate frescoes from the Hindu religion and a sprawling courtyard well-laid with gardens. It is well known for more than many thousand carvings & inscriptions on & in the temple depicting the mighty story of Ramayana. It has about 1000 carvings & inscriptions depicting the story of Ramayana.
 
 
 
Hemakuta group of temples
Krishna Temple Complex: This temple complex has been recently excavated through the last decade, and restoration work is still in progress. The temple has the Sacred Tank or the Pushkarani located on its eastern side.
 
 
 
Vittala Temple Complex:
This is perhaps the most famous and well-known among the ruins of Hampi. The iconic stone chariot in the vicinity of this temple complex is a symbol of Karnataka Tourism. Off late, floodlights have been installed in the temple complex, that provide illumination at dusk, thereby adding to the grandeur of the architecture.
The temple houses the famous musical pillars. The British wanted to check the reason behind this wonder and so they had cut two pillars to check anything was there inside the pillars that was producing the sound. They had found nothing but hollow pillars. Even today we can see those pillars cut by the British.
The road leading to the temple was once a market where the horses were traded. Even today we can see the ruins of the market on both the sides of the road. The temple contains the images of foreigners like Persians selling horses.
 
 
Muslim Sunni masjid
Preksha temple and groups
Sasivekalu Ganesha
Virupaksha Temple known as the Pampavathi temple, it is an ancient temple situated in the Hampi Bazaar. It predates the founding of the Vijayanagar empire. The temple has a 160-foot (49 m) high tower at its entrance. Apart from Shiva, the temple complex also contains shrines of the erotica statues Bhuvaneshwari and Pampa.
Underground Shiva Temple
Yantrodharaka Anjaneya temple.

 

The special person of this Issue is Laurent, legendary French DJ who introduced electronic music to the beaches of Goa, India and played there regularly during the years of 1983-1993.
 

Part of the hippie traveller wave that flocked to Goa beginning in the 60s and 70s, Laurent took the early sounds of electronic dance music and, through a combination of clever track selection and customized digital tape edits, turned it into a futuristic form of sixties psychedelia. The extended edit wasn't a new thing (it had been done back in the days of disco), but he realized that by cutting out vocals and extending passages with nothing but synthesizers and drum machines you could create a ritualistic atmosphere, one especially suited to the Goa environment. An environment that was awash with acid and chillums, shot through with mystical trappings, and set outdoors in beautiful nature. As well as his editing skills, his collection and knowledge of music was beyond extensive, tapping a global network of friends for music that came from everywhere and every style. He drew from rock, dub, electrofunk, disco, new wave, industrial, house, experimental art-pop, and American techno from Chicago and Detroit. He would also incorporate European forms of techno -- like trance, the genre he helped create -- and in doing so, he eventually became part of a feedback loop going from Goa DJs to studio musicians and back again.

By the beginning of the nineties, artists were travelling to Goa, hearing Laurent and DJs influenced by Laurent, coming home, and making music based on what they had heard. Trance, and what would become psytrance, owe much to his expansive attitude. He was a pioneer of the 'party as journey' concept... dark, inward-focused music at night would fuck with the dancers' heads, and at sunrise, dreamlike reveries would bring them gently back to Earth. For those who dropped acid, this seems especially appropriate.

By his own estimate, Laurent played around 10,000 different tracks during his years in Goa. It's not entirely clear why, by 1994, he had quit DJing. The changing nature of the music may have contributed to it: Goa had coalesced into its own musical style by then, one that had been streamlined into a fast techno/trance hybrid. Full moon parties, trance dances, or just Goa parties were the terms before then, but now artists were making "Goa Trance" with its own particular motifs and aesthetic. This was incredible music, IMHO... it brought much-needed color, nuance and experimentation to a techno that too often limited itself to dystopian gray or was content to pound its listeners into submission. Still, Goa Trance (later called psychedelic trance or just psytrance) was too uniform for some old-schoolers, who missed the days of even wilder experimentalism. LSD was still the drug of choice, but some complained that you just couldn't dance all night to 140 BPM.

Perhaps, though, Laurent had simply done everything he had wanted to do as a DJ and decided that it was time to move on. He remains an enigmatic figure, posting on the occasional forum when it strikes his fancy. In a massive infodump, posted on discogs.com, he revealed 1,000 of the tracks he had used; all commercial releases, ranging from the extremely obscure to the very well known. I learned so, so much from that tracklist: it gave me many happy weeks on Youtube, swelled my record collection, and led to a tribute mix.

Looking at the list, we are struck by how counterintuitive much of it seems. I picture juxtapositions of the most bizarre kinds... The B-52s and Front 242; Blancmange and Afrika Bambaataa; Thomas Dolby and Italo disco. Laurent's genius, we think, was to identify the shared transcendental impulse behind much contemporary music, and to put that under a sonic magnifying glass for all to hear.

The early Goa scene took the artificially imposed distinction between 'head' electronic music and 'body' electronic dance music and took a sledgehammer to it, flattening it out into an open experiential field. It showed that EDM could be as transformative, complex, and confrontational as a psychedelic trip; that it could provide, not just an escape from reality, but whole new ways of engaging with it.

Sadly, but now we do not have any idea where is Laurent and what happen to him. Probably he or some of his friend will read this article and ask him to contact to us. But it will be other story

VIDEO- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0FzuhqxWA0

Party in Maharashtra 1992. DJ Laurent in the mix.
Saturday, 18 January 2014 04:21

Page 2: Interviews - Eight Finger Eddie

In this special Real Goa Edition we present two interviews with the legendary people that played the key role in rising and establishment of Hippie Culture in Goa and literally founded Anjuna and Vagator as a future generation party destination.
 
 
 
Yertward Mazamanian (8 March 1924 ñ 18 October 2010), widely known as "Eight Finger Eddie", was an American hippie of Armenian descent, who was credited with popularizing Goa, India as a tourist destination from the mid-1960s onward. Mazamanian was born with only three fingers on his right hand, and was one of seven children of Armenian immigrants from Istanbul who apparently settled near Boston. In his memoirs, he claimed to have been a Boy Scout, a regular churchgoer and an "honors student" at school. During the Second World War he convinced an Army psychiatrist that he was unfit for military service, and worked for a while for the General Electric Company before being sacked.
He performed occasionally as a bass player in jazz bands, consumed large quantities of illegal drugs, married, and divorced, before moving to southern California around 1950. In the 1950s, he lived for a time in Mexico, and in the early 1960s was based in Copenhagen, traveling to Spain, Morocco and elsewhere with friends in a camper van. Around 1964 he made his first trip to Iran, India and Nepal, eventually settling for a period at Colva in Goa. Around 1966, he settled at Anjuna beach in Goa, at that time "a tiny hamlet with a few tea stalls and houses dotting a pristine sandy beach".
He started a soup kitchen at Anjuna, to assist the growing numbers of western travelers who came to the area as a final stopping place on the "hippie trail", and, in 1975, set up a flea market mainly for the foreign hippies wanting to barter their unwanted possessions and "hang out". The presence of Eddie and his companions was tolerated by locals, Goan writer Dominic Fernandes commented that "hey were in love with this place. And we fell in love with them, because of the way they lived."
Apart from regular visits to Kathmandu, and to Bombay to renew his American passport, Mazamanian aka "Eight Finger Eddie" remained in Goa for the remainder of his life. The area gradually became a top tourist destination with hotels and casinos catering for a commercial tourist market quite different from its origins in the 1960s and 1970s. The market at Anjuna itself turned into a thriving retail center. In 1991, he commented:
"Some people say it's not like it used to be, and it's not. But I like it here now. I like the parties. And I like the music. It's good to dance to."
When he became ill, a Danish journalist launched a campaign to raise money for his medical bills. After his death, he was cremated according to Hindu rites, and his ashes scattered at Anjuna.
 
 
The second person we felt we must talk to is the true legend of Goa Freaks. Professor Shripad, real psy guru, the pioner of the beach business on Goa costs and one of the best locals in the town. We went to Bom Shankar chaishop, Vagator to meet our old friend. And here is what he told us :

 

 

Saturday, 18 January 2014 04:21

Page 3: Freakstories - Goa Hippies

The legends, myths, mysteries from Hippies till nowadays will be published here to introduce you the history of establishment of World's Psychedelic Culture
 
 
Goa Hippies then and now...
Goa became famous as a hippie destination in the 1960s. Most hippies around the world went on to different things, like raising families or joining politics or playing the stock market. But in Goa, the hippie phenomenon is frozen in time ñ with many hippies still here living much the same lifestyle as they did 40 years ago.

One of Goaís most well-known hippies is a man known as Loka Devadas. Now 64, heís been coming to Goa since 1967. Born Bjorn Skalen, he worked as a teacher in his native Sweden for many years. His wanderlust began at the age of 19, when he hitchhiked to Kathmandu to meet Hindu sadhus and Buddhist monks. Devadas says his spiritual quest culminated in the 70s when he met Osho Rajneesh, the famous Indian guru whose criticism of organized religion and support of more open attitudes towards sexuality made him a controversial figure. Today, Devadas runs a website, http://friakademi.se/, to share talks, music, sound art, digital sculptures and videos through which he aims to inspire meditation, humour and awareness.

The Woodstock festival celebrated in New York in 1969 became an important symbol of hippie culture, of the free-thinking people who epitomised love, peace and music. These ëflower powerí people adorned themselves with blossoms, swam in the lake, danced with the wind, cooked and shared food in open fields,  often got high on marijuana, and made lots of music. It was around this time that writers like Allen Ginsberg, Ken Casey, Neal Cassady and Jack Kerouac gave birth to the ìBeatnikî genre of un-repressed written expression, while Bob Dylan and Bob Marley immortalised the philosophy of love and peace with their songs. Perhaps for the first time since Gandhi, peace again made headlines because of the Woodstock hippies.
Many hippies from all over the world were attracted to India around this time. Some drifted to newly found spiritual centres in Pondicherry or Pune; others immersed themselves in a spiritual movement called Iskcon (International Society for Krishna Consciousness) and some also refused to associate with any spiritual tag. Many returned to their countries and went on to raise families, settled in routine jobs, or even began making big money on the Wall Street.

In Goa, the first small group of these happy-go-lucky people found their haven in Anjuna, in the sixties, a sleepy village with few residents. People with names like Eight-finger Eddie, Junky Robert, Hollywood Peter and Trumpet Steve immortalised Goaís hippie identity. Slowly, the word spread and more and more foreigners came flocking. The Anjuna flea market began swarming with barter and business. The local economy blossomed.

Wolfram, who first came to Goa in 1967, remembers those days: ìAll the doors used to be open. No one locked their homes. When I returned to Goa in 1974, there were all these big, big locks! And it was so cheap, 80 paisa for a pig thali, one rupee if you eat at a big hotel.î

Wolfram is fondly called ìMuji,î short for Bangladeshís first president Mujibur Rahman, by his friends in Anjuna and Arambol. The 69-year-old Austrian comes to Goa for six months every year when the Austrian winters become too cold for comfort. The German Bakery in Anjuna is his favourite joint, as it is with many hippies who adopt Goa as their second home for several months every year. Pankaj Kohli, owner of the bakery, laughs when asked to point out some regulars: ìHow can I point out a hippie for you? Itís not about dressing or smoking. Itís all in the mind!î

Indeed, the ìhippieî tag immediately creates an image of a rebel, a bohemian outcast who refuses to look and behave as expected by society. In Goa, many live life on their own terms by following creative pursuits, all the while spreading the mantra of world peace and love.

True, times have changed. But John Paris, who stays in Goa half of each year, is happy with the new generation heís seeing today.

People always ask me if I am disappointed with the crowds of young people flocking to Arambol. I tell them this: ëWhen I came to Goa in 1965, there were just 50 of us doing yoga, singing and dancing by the lake. Now, there are 50,000 of us, most of them young blood.í That is nothing but good!í It proves that we are still a people that believe in love, in caring.î

Just as he refuses to buy flowers, John refuses to use the cell phone and shuns electronic devices. Most of his friends also live a frugal, yet full-throttle fun lifestyle. They may be frozen in time, but the hippies in Goa continue to make noise for peace.
This is a special area of top secret information from the Past, Present and Future of Goa Freaks World.
 
 
The rise of EDM music in Goa
During the Seventies, the musical repertoire of the first Goa DJs was mostly made of the mind-blowing rock music of the time : Led Zeppelin, the Who - both groups came to Goa - the Grateful Dead, the Doors, Neil Young, the Eagle, Pink Floyd, but also some Bob Marley, Parliament...

In 1979, one or two songs by Kraftwerk could already be heard during the parties. But it is in 1983 that two French DJs, Laurent and Fred Disko, soon followed by Goa Gil, organizer of the "Full Moon Parties" alternating live groups and DJs, grew tired of the "rock/fusion/reggae" tunes they used to spin and began to play the electrobeat music coming from Europe : Cabaret Voltaire, Nitzer Ebb, Front 242, Frontline Assembly, the Residents, New Order, Blanc MangeÖ
It is worth noticing that a similar phenomenon was taking place in the United States, particularly in Detroit, on WGPR radio thanks to Charles Johnson, also known as Electrifying Mojo, or in Chicago, in the Warehouse club with DJ Frankie Knuckles. The seeds of Goa Trance, Techno and House were planted at the same time.

Back to Goa.
These new sounds were first mildly appreciated by the Hippies. The tunes played by Fred Disko were too strange for them. Laurent took everything under control, and thanks to his less eccentric style, acidheads began to prefer these futuristic sounds to the wah-wah of Jimi Hendrix. On top of that, it was easier to dance with that kind of music.

The Goa mixes
From then on, the gathering and exchange of the weirdest and most mind-blowing music from all over the world, called "special music", became the official sport of the Goa Hippie community. The remix of the tracks was a necessary task, since most of them included pointless lyrics and were way too short. The DJs used walkmans to record the useful parts of the tunes, and then proceeded to all sorts of manipulations before delivering 100% Goa-style mixes to the dancing crowd.
And then, as early as 1985, all the music played in Goa had become electronic. Some well-known groups could be identified, like Frankie Goes to Hollywood, Dead or Alive, Portion ControlÖ Yet, most of the time, the tracks came from 12" B-sides or dub mixes, which were very hard to get. As an illustration, here is a short anecdote about Sven V‰th, the German Pope of Trance, when he first visited Goa : "One of the first Goa DJs, Laurent, came up and said how much they liked my early, 16-bit recordings. Hardly anybody knows those records !"
 


The Full Moon Parties : an initiation
Until the mid-90's, the Hippie vibe, which had remained strong on the Goa beaches for 30 years, had a huge influence on the travellers :


Tsuyoshi Suzuki [Prana] : " My life changed. I dropped out of the society completely. In Japan, you have to belong to the company. This is how our parents educated us. So, I graduated from University, then I worked. After Goa, I just quit. "

Mark Allen [Quirk] : " I realised working to earn lots of money was not what I wanted to do with my life. My optimistic vision is that it's not so much dropping out as realising that you don't have to do a nine-to-five. It's actually trough coming together and celebrating life together that it inspires other people to go off, travel, get creative. So many people are just in a job, frustrated, dreaming."

James Munro [Technossomy] : " It opened me up to religion. Seeing how you can be happy without materialism. The ambitions I had when I was little, of earning shit loads of money, just went."

As Goa Gil always says, the Goa spirit is more than "a disco under the coconut trees". Actually, the DJ is looked upon as a modern shaman, turning his desk into an altar (with Hindu symbols for instance), and leading his congregation to a spiritual journey through the night, rewriting the history of humankind : soft and slow tracks at the beginning, getting more and more repetitive and harder. The climax is reached at dawn, and then happier and more melodic tunes are played, so as to welcome the sunrise. Symbolically, this evolution of the musical set represents the destruction of the ego, before the created void is filled with light.

Contrary to other forms of EDM, the mix quality is not that important : on the one hand, the journey that is told through the set needs breaks, and on the other hand beatmatching would prove almost impossible with the historical use of cassettes and DAT during the parties (vinyls would melt or get dirty with dust).

A typical party
The party season is from November to April. Two renowned places are Bamboo Forest on Anjuna Beach and Disco Valley on Vagator. Legally speaking, playing amplified music after 10pm is forbidden : thus, every party is technically breaking the law. Until 1990, a little baksheesh - the money came from the bars receipts or directly from the pockets of the Trancers - or a few beers would keep the police away.

To find a party, you have to rely on the rumours you heard during the day, or ask the taxi drivers. At dusk, people go the their favourite bar on the beach (e.g. Shore Bar on South Anjuna or Nine Bar on Vagator Beach). There, you drink a beer and smoke your first joint. Around 9pm, it's dinner time. At midnight, the music begins to be played loud. You can follow the Vespa line, driving through the night, guided by the throbbing beats.
Here you are. All around the dance floor, in front of which stands the shaman-DJ under his tent, you have the chill-out zone, with its kerosene lamps and its mats placed by local women, selling tea, sandwiches, fruits, cigarettes. This is also the place where you will meet the dealers.
Between 3am and 5am, the party reaches its peak. The music generally stops around noon, but huge parties can go on for several days.
 
 
Saturday, 21 December 2013 18:37

Page 2: Interview Raja Ram 2 & 3

Here you can watch, listen and remember the friendly talking between our reporters and the very special people from Goa Freaks World about art, music, culture, space, lifestyle and different bullshit

The legends, myths, mysteries from Hippies till nowadays will be published here to introduce you the history of establishment of World's Psychedelic Culture
 
A Brief History of the Hippie Trail
 
Overland from Europe to Asia in search of Hashish - Origins of the Hippie Trail
 
The roots of the Hippie Trail probably lie with the overland expeditions of the mid-1950s, when small groups of wealthy individuals or sponsored students would travel east from England by Land Rover or Bedford Dormobile to climb mountains or carry out scientific studies and surveys, often publishing accounts of their travels afterwards.
Many who read of such pioneering trips were less interested in science or mountaineering than with the descriptions of the exotic places and cultures on the way. Air travel was in its infancy and prohibitively expensive, but for those seeking adventure the prospect of an epic overland journey was both attractive and increasingly affordable.
The first established British bus company to ply the overland route was The Indiaman in 1957, closely followed by Swagman Tours (later renamed Asian Greyhound). These began as one-man operations catering for a handful of adventurous travellers, and as the economy boomed and the market grew, other bus companies started to spring up in the 1960s.
 
Advent of the Hippies
The first overland travellers who might be described as hippies appeared in about 1967, when the term became shorthand for just about anyone with long hair. The concept of the "mystic east" was gaining interest, and after The Beatles visited India in a blaze of publicity in 1968 the number of young people hitting the road from western Europe began to increase dramatically.
And they weren't all Europeans. Americans and Canadians crossed the Atlantic to take part, Australians and New Zealanders had a strong backpacking tradition and found the route convenient. Westerners of all nationalities were represented.
They had many reasons for going: some sought spiritual enlightenment, some were escaping from a rigid conventional lifestyle, some saw opportunities for profit, and some just wanted to see the world. They all had a sense of adventure, but not all of them could be described as hippies - many were simply keen to explore the overland route to the east, first blazed by Marco Polo.
But from the late 1960s onwards the largest contingent, united by a common interest, were the young people with long hair who gave the hippie trail its name - and what defined the hippie trail was that it led to the major hashish-producing centres of the world.
Afghanistan, Chitral, Kashmir, Nepal - familiar names to the pot-smokers of the sixties and seventies, most of whom knew very little else about the countries where their herb of choice was cultivated. But for the next ten years or so they set off in their thousands to look for it.
Overland bus companies sprang up to cater for them, advertising cheap tickets in the "underground press". They shared the road with a motley procession of private cars, vans, minibuses, even motorbikes. Many vehicles never made it all the way, and many more never made it back. It was, after all, a journey of over 6,000 miles in each direction, and it took in high mountain passes, scorching deserts, and some very rough roads.
Popular legend tells of the Magic Bus that left from Amsterdam - except that it never did. The company was merely a booking agency and didn't actually own any buses. Passengers were found places aboard the scores of independent coaches that plied the route. Other companies such as Budget Bus did actually run their own small fleet of vehicles.
Public transport was another option. Although the railway in those days ended in eastern Turkey, from Istanbul onwards there were cheap local buses, and western drivers also picked up passengers from the city's famous Pudding Shop, where rides in independent vehicles could often be arranged. Access to cheap rail travel resumed in Pakistan and India.
People also hitch-hiked, particularly on the way home, though this was usually only possible in Europe, and the cost of public transport was extremely low in Asia. Westerners who could drive were sometimes paid to take vehicles from Germany to Lebanon or Iran, another way of affording the trip.
 
The Hippie Trail Route
The route of the hippie trail essentially started at Istanbul, the point at which all roads from Europe converged. From here the direct route led straight across Turkey, though some headed south for Lebanon, for centuries the main hashish producer of the Middle East.
From Turkey the route continued across Iran, then a secular country run by the Shah, and on to Afghanistan, the first major destination of the hippie trail, a land where foreigners were made very welcome and where a large proportion of the population used hashish themselves.
After Afghanistan the trail offered many diversions. On entering Pakistan some would head north towards Chitral, but the majority crossed the country and entered India, where a trip up to Kashmir was an immediate option for enthusiastic potheads. Northern India also offered Manali, another popular destination for hippies and another centre of marijuana cultivation.
In winter months most hippies would head south for the beaches of Goa, where hashish was always freely available (though it was not actually produced there). But in the summer the hippie trail ended in the mountains of Nepal, where until 1973 there were many hashish shops operating legally, and where there was no real difficulty obtaining the world's finest charas afterwards.
Visas, where required, could be obtained easily at the borders or towns en route. British passport holders did not require a visa to stay in India long-term.
 
Always A Freak - Never A Hippie
Those who went on the hippie trail often referred to it as "going to India", a shorthand way of describing the trip. They did not call themselves "hippies" anyway, preferring the term "freaks", and in Kathmandu everyone knew where "Freak Street" was (though the official name was Jochen Tole).
While other travellers - those who were not "freaks" - quite reasonably refer to the route as "the overland", there really was a distinct hippie trail. In every major stop along the way there were hotels, restaurants and cafes that catered almost exclusively to the pot-smoking westerners, who networked with each other as they wandered east and west - there were no Lonely Planet guides in those days, and (of course) there was no internet.
This influx of long-haired western youth must have been a curiosity to the locals, who were largely unaccustomed to tourists of any sort back then. But they were generally hospitable, and many found welcome ways to derive extra income. Their experience was caricatured in the 1971 Bollywood movie Hare Rama Hare Krishna, which featured a scene involving chillum-smoking hippies, accompanied by the enormously popular Asha Bosle song Dum Maro Dum.
The hippies tended to spend more time interacting with the local population than traditional sightseeing tourists - they had no interest in luxury accommodation, even if they could afford it (which few could), and some would "go native" after a fashion, particularly in India. Of course, they were still tourists really, albeit of a different sort, and hedonism was the primary aim.
There were casualties, undoubtedly. Staying healthy could be difficult, particularly in Afghanistan, and even hippies can suffer from culture shock. Some would get severely ill, or run out of money, and have to be flown home. Others would wind up in jail, not a pleasant experience anywhere and particularly tough in a third world country.
Most survived, however, and lived to tell the tale on their return, often inspiring others to follow in their footsteps. And a few stayed on, found ways to support themselves, and still live in India.
 
The End of The Road
The classic hippie trail came to an end in 1979, when Islamic revolution in Iran and the Russian invasion of Afghanistan closed the overland route to western travellers. Lebanon had already lapsed into civil war, Chitral and Kashmir became less inviting due to tensions in the area, and even Nepal eventually lost its peace and tranquility.
Air travel had by now become affordable and Goa became the main centre of the hippie scene, based around the village of Anjuna, where hippies had been renting houses for many years before any hotels were built to accommodate the massive influx of tourists in the 1980s.
Those who flew to Goa in later years to partake of the hippie lifestyle doubtless enjoyed themselves, and the more adventurous will have travelled around India and learned from the experience. But the overland hippie trail, which lasted little more than ten years, was gone forever.

 

Saturday, 14 December 2013 16:10

FreakStories - The True Story of Goa Trance

The True Story of Goa Trance. Goa Trance is a sub-genre of electronic dance music – EDM which had started to take its form back in 80’s. However, the very first instigators, ideologists and style formers can be found even further in the past, more accurately – during the period of psychedelic rock in the 60’s and 70’s. Considering the name of this style, it’s easy to relate it with the Indian province called Goa, which is located on the western bank of India.
 
The historical and cultural heritage of Goa is known world-wide, for it was a colony that was fought over during many periods in the past. The first conflicts in that region were between Hindu and Muslim population. These conflicts can be tracked to as far as 10th century, and they had continued all the way to the 16th century. In the year of 1510, Portuguese colonists arrived to Goa. They made a great influence in this Indian province, which can be seen in numerous catholic churches and monasteries that were built during that time. But, the Portuguese were not the only European nation that controlled Goa in the history.
 
The British colonists occupied the region two times. The first period was from 1797. to 1798. and again from 1802. – 1813. During 1961. Indian army seized control over Goa, and integrated it into the sovereign country of India. Multi-cultural history of Goa has its place in history of Goa Trance genre, especially when we point out the very first parties that were organized on the beaches of Goa during the 60’s. According to Ray Castle (one of the first DJs in Goa) the first colonists were hippies which were coming to India seeking spirituality. The second important factor which mostly attracted Europeans (and Americans) to this region was that there was no legal limitation to the consuming of hashish. This was a fact until the mid-70’s when the US government pressed the issue on Indian authorities to ban this practice.
 
Early history of the pioneers of Goa and their first parties was never documented, but according to some witnesses (who were hippies at that time), the first Goa parties were organized in 1968. thanks to eight-finger Eddie who was probably the first modern settler on the beaches of Goa. Together with his friends, he discovered beautiful beaches and got friendly with the local villagers, which gave them a feeling of absolute freedom and happiness, which they had expressed through consuming psychedelic drugs and dancing on the beach. The music at that time did not have any relations to the style of Goa trance, or even with electronic music in general, but the philosophy which they were following is almost the same as the one that Goa trance followers are sharing today.
 
The music that had to do with Goa parties back then was more related to bands like Grateful Dead, The Doors, The Eagles, and Pink Floyd.
 
Fred Disko was one of the first DJs in Goa who started to promote electronic music as well. After all, that decision gave him his “Disko” pseudonym. Besides Fred Disko, there was earlier mentioned Ray Castle, and Goa Gil, who promoted rock/fusion during the 70’s.
 
Later, in the 80’s, Goa Gil started to promote Goa influenced electronic music too, and he gave it a rather “simple” name: the first post-punk experimental electronic dance music coming from Europe, the neue deutsche welle, electronic body music.
 
Ray Castle explained that the very first form of Goa Trance sound could be recognized with bands/projects like Nitzer Ebb, Front 242, Frontline Assembly. Fred Disko also mentioned the influence of classical-traditional Indian music which was easily recognized in Goa trance sound. The symbiosis of these rather different influences was inevitable. The reasons of that symbiosis become very clear, especially when you imagine 10 tablas, 6 sitars and an Indian female vocalist performing a song in the repetitive way, so that you can actually feel like flying. Fred Disko and Ray Cole said that the contemporary “scene” in Goa was formed from a handful of DJs who were mostly people from France, Italy, Germany, Netherlands and Switzerland. The main goal was to exchange and collect the music which was brought from Europe. They were all trying to obtain hard-to-get rare music as much as they could. They also wanted to have rarities which sounded more psychedelic. These quests were labelled as “The quest for weird psychedelic music”. The great part of their inspiration was hidden within the consummation of LSD, the drug which became a symbol of Goa parties, especially because it was easy to get, and mostly free of charge. It was known as “free acid punch”.
 
DJs of the late 80’s had often used DATs for their DJ sets, but the preparations for the show were hard and time-consuming. According to Steve Psyko (he was also one of the first Goa DJs), the DJs would often cut-out the parts of the songs mixing them with other tracks, in order to create a mega-mix which would be played at the parties later on. The use of vinyl records was not practiced because of the risk that the vinyl could actually melt due to high temperatures.
 
Ray Castle recalls one time when DJ Sven Vath came to Goa with all his records, in order to become “Techno pope of India”. However, that didn't work out well, because you just have to be used to DATs on such high temperatures. Paul Chambers (British Goa trance DJ) recalls his trips to Goa and the very first electronic music parties that were held there. There were no more than 200 people on those events. The decorations were really colourful but not numerous and there were a few black-light lamps around. The first police raids occurred during the 1990. but the situation became better in 1991. and 1992. It was during these years, that the first hype and rush to Goa had started.
 
The number of people on parties noticeably increased, and the numbers were from 500 to 1500 visitors. More and more people were coming to Goa, especially from Israel and Japan. With the increasing number of tourists that arrived to Goa to dance, consume drugs and live a free life, the whole underground feeling started to fade, and the music itself started to become more and more popular. This was even more supported by numerous English and other European DJs and publishers, which resulted in first releases in the 1993. The release which was probably the most influential for Goa trance uprising was the Project II Trance, released by Dragonfly Records.
 
This release featured artists like Gumbo, Genetic, The Infinity Project, Total Eclipse, Mandra Gora and others. Except for Goa trance in India, parties started to occur in other parts of the world, and the most known ones were in Byron Bay (Australia), where many hippies found their new place for Goa trance, since more and more tourists were visiting Goa and the scene was booming. In England, the first Goa trance parties were organized in London and Manchester. It was interesting that almost the very same DJs performed in Goa and in England, and the visitors were mostly the same in the both areas. It was just a matter of season where the caravan will be settled. after Goa trance found its place in electronic music scene, many new artists, publishers and DJs had emerged. It would take a lot of time to mention all of the names which took part in the scene during the six golden years of Goa trance (1993-1999).
 
We want to mention only some of the most notorius  RECORD LABELS : Dragonfly / Perfecto Fluoro / Flying Rhino / Blue Room Released / Matsuri Productions / TIP Records / Symbiosis / Krembo / BooM / Platipus / RETURN TO THE SOURCE / PSYCHIC DELI / Phantasm / Transient / PHONOKOL.
 
Also we will remind you a true heroes of the past, the messengers of Space, those DJs, who started from the very beginning of Goa Trance scene and spread the music around the Globe: PAUL OAKENFOLD, GOA GIL, RAY CASTLE, STEVE PSYKO, FRED DISKO, RICKARD AHLBERG, DOMINIC LAMB, SVEN VATH, TSUYOSHI SUZUKI, PLANET B.E.N., MARK ALLEN, LORAN, OFIR DIKOVSKI SHIVA JORG,OLLIE WISDOM MIKO
 
Sad fact- almost all of these artists are the history now, and real Goa trance era finished in early 2000. We will regret about that times always as the best times of our life.
 

Friday, 15 November 2013 08:50

Interview - Raja Ram 1 & 2

In this section we will present to you the exclusive interviews with the very special people in Goa Psychedelic Culture.
Today we finally present you first two parts of the exclusive video interview of double trouble trance gang. Two of the oldest and eldest Goa Freaks opening their hearts and refreshing the memories of good old days. Raja Ram and Chicago, live from Goa... Amazing video. Must Watch and listen.

Thursday, 27 December 2012 20:29

The True Story of Goa Trance part6

The True Story of Goa Trance part6
The music in that period (1993-1999) was characterized as psychedelic trance-dance. That term was mentioned even earlier and it was often used as a title for parties. The tracks became longer than earlier, so the average track was around 8.30 minutes, and the tempo was around 145 BPM (beats per minute). Generally, the BPM range can vary from 120 to 160. The structure of tracks mostly had the same pattern, so almost every track had an atmospheric intro, 4/4 rhythm which was followed by oriental and eastern melodies, acid sounds (the legendary TB303) and vocal samples (mostly taken from SF movies

The climax of the track would usually emerge around 5th minute, although some tracks didn’t follow that pattern. Iconography on parties, CD covers and T-shirts was mostly related to Hindu and Buddhist motifs.
 
There were also science-fiction motives (mostly aliens, UFOs and other characters), colourful psychedelic fractals and drawings.
The end of Goa trance music occurred in the period between 1998./1999  with the newly formed psy trance sound which was rather minimalistic comparing to Goa trance, containing less melodies, shorter bass lines and sharper kicks with emphasis on psychedelic sound effects. Many Goa trance projects started to fade, while others formed within the psytrance genre.
 
Although, some other projects kept their former names while they adjusted their production to the present trend.
 
One of such examples is a legendary Goa trance project – Etnica. Many publishers also followed the change, and one of the biggest trance labels, TIP records was renamed to TIP World. TIP Records used to publish Goa trance (The Infinity Project, Doof, Psychopod...) while TIP World started to publish new projects like GMS, Logic Bomb, 1200 Mics, and others.
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